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Labelling requirements for meat and poultry products
Use of soy protein isolate or hydrolyzed soy protein in meat products

Soy protein isolate and hydrolyzed soy protein are derived from vegetable material. They are subject to certain restrictions when they are added to meat products.

When used as a carrier of a seasoning

Soy protein isolate or hydrolyzed soy protein may be added to poultry meat as a carrier of a seasoning if the combination of the seasoning and the carrier contributes 1% or less of the protein content in the finished meat product. Under Canadian Standards of Identity, Volume 7 – Meat Products, "seasonings" and "spices" are the foods designated in Division 7 of Part B of the FDR. Soy protein isolate and hydrolyzed soy protein may not be used as the sole ingredient for this function since they are not included in this division.

If the addition of seasoning to a meat product, including poultry products, contributes more than 1% of the protein content in the finished meat product, the added seasoning is considered to be a filler (definition) [23(c), Canadian Standards of Identity - Volume 7]. Refer to When used as a filler section below for more information.

When soy protein isolate or hydrolyzed soy protein is used as a carrier of a seasoning, with the seasoning and carrier combination contributing no more than 1% of the protein content in the finished meat product, the term "seasoned" may be included within the common name of the meat product to reflect this addition.

When used as a carrier of a seasoning, soy protein isolate and hydrolyzed soy protein are not exempt from being declared in the list of ingredients, despite the exemption provided for ingredients and components of seasoning preparations. Since both these substances have a water retention function in the meat product, they must be shown in the list of ingredients by their respective common names as if they are an ingredient of the meat product. As well, hydrolyzed soy protein is a substance that must always be declared [B.01.009(3)(c) and (f), FDR]. For more information, refer to Components of preparations which must always be declared under List of ingredients and allergens - Manner of declaring.

When used as a filler

Certain standards of identity for meat products permit the use of a filler, while others do not. In situations where a filler is permitted to be added to a standardized meat product, the common name does not need to reflect this addition. For example, a chicken burger that has soy protein isolate added as a filler may bear the common name "chicken burger" [items 8 and 9, Part A, Table 2, Canadian Standards of identity - Volume 7].

In situations where a filler is not permitted in a standardized meat product, the standardized common name may not be used when a filler has been added. Rather, a common name that accurately describes the food, and how it deviates from the standard, must be used. For example, if soy protein isolate or hydrolyzed soy protein is added to the standardized meat product "cooked boneless chicken breast" [item 28, Part A, Table 2, Canadian Standards of identity - Volume 7], the common name must be modified to reflect the addition of the filler. For this product, "cooked boneless chicken breast with soy protein isolate" or "cooked boneless chicken breast with hydrolyzed soy protein", as applicable, would be an acceptable common name.

Meat products that contain a filler, except white pudding, haggis or one of the meat products listed in Table 2 of Volume 7, must contain:

Therefore, the meat product "cooked boneless chicken breast with soy protein isolate" or "cooked boneless chicken breast with hydrolyzed soy protein" referred to above would be required to contain 11.5% meat product protein and 13% total protein.

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