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D-10-01: General phytosanitary requirements for fresh pepper and tomato fruit imported from the world

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Effective date: October 19, 2022
(3rd Revision)

Subject

This directive outlines the phytosanitary requirements for fresh pepper and tomato fruit imported into Canada.

The following changes have been made as part of this revision:

This document supersedes all previous versions of directive D-10-01.

On this page

1.0 Legislative authority

2.0 Definitions, abbreviations and acronyms

Definitions of terms used in this document can be found in the International Standard for Phytosanitary Measures 5: Glossary of phytosanitary terms or the Canadian Food Inspection Agency's (CFIA) Plant Health Glossary of Terms.

3.0 Introduction

Imported fresh tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) and pepper (Capsicum spp.) fruit is regulated by the CFIA to prevent the introduction and spread of plant pests that can cause significant economic and environmental damage to the Canadian plant resource base including agriculture, forestry and the environment.

2 insect pests, Thaumatotibia leucotreta in association with fresh pepper fruit, and Tuta absoluta in association with fresh tomato fruit, are of particular concern. Specific phytosanitary requirements targeting those pests, as well as general phytosanitary requirements for fresh pepper and tomato fruit imported from the world are presented.

4.0 Scope

4.1 Regulated pests

Scientific name Common name
Thaumatotibia leucotreta False codling moth
Tuta absoluta Tomato leaf miner, South American tomato moth

The list of pests regulated by Canada does not include all organisms that represent a plant health risk to Canada. When a new pest is found on or in association with plants or plant products, it will be categorized and, when appropriate, added to the list. See the List of pests regulated by Canada for more information.

If an importer becomes aware of the presence of a thing that they suspect to be a pest, the person shall immediately notify the CFIA, as described in Section 5 of the Plant Protection Act.

4.2 Regulated articles

4.3 Articles exempt

Pepper and tomato fruit that have been processed in a manner that mitigates pest risk (for example, frozen, canned, dried, cooked, pureed, fermented).

4.4 Regulated areas

All countries except the United States and Mexico.

5.0 Import requirements

5.1 General import requirements

Country-specific import requirements may be obtained by consulting CFIA's Automated Import Reference System (AIRS).

See Appendix 1 for a list of countries approved to export fresh pepper or tomato fruit to Canada.

Consignments must be free of soil, regulated pests, leaves, branches, and plant debris.

Containers must be new or cleaned in a manner that mitigates risks from regulated plant pests, and removes organic matter, soil and/or soil-related matter.

Fresh pepper and tomato fruit from a foreign country entering Canada via a third country must meet the same phytosanitary requirements as consignments being imported directly into Canada from the country of origin. Consignments of plant products entering Canada are subject to inspection by the CFIA.

Note: importing tomato and pepper fruit for re-packing may constitute a high risk activity that could negatively impact Canadian-grown products. Packing facilities adjacent to a place of production or located in a tomato or pepper production area should implement best management practices to prevent potential cross-infestation of Canadian crops by pests associated with foreign product.

5.2 Fresh pepper and tomato fruit from new origins

Canada requires a pest risk analysis prior to approving the importation of fresh pepper and tomato fruit from a new country of origin.

For more information on the process used by the CFIA to evaluate the pest risk associated with a commodity, see Pest Risk Analysis: How we evaluate fruits, vegetables and plants from new countries of origin.

5.3 Countries where Thaumatotibia leucotreta or Tuta absoluta are absent

Countries approved to export to Canada (Appendix 1), and where T. leucotreta or T. absoluta are absent, must notify the CFIA should the pest status of the country change.

A phytosanitary certificate is required. An additional declaration is not required.

5.4 Countries where Thaumatotibia leucotreta or Tuta absoluta are present

Countries approved to export to Canada, and where T. leucotreta or T. absoluta are present, must meet one of the following import requirements:

A phytosanitary certificate with corresponding additional declaration is required.

Appendix 1 provides a list of countries approved to export fresh pepper and tomato fruit to Canada, the phytosanitary certification options they are approved to use and the corresponding additional declarations that must be included on the phytosanitary certificate.

5.4.1 CFIA-recognized pest-free area

Fresh tomato and pepper fruit originating from countries where T. leucotreta or T. absoluta are present may be certified for export to Canada if produced in a CFIA-recognized pest-free area.

The pest-free area must be established and administrated under the authority of the National Plant Protection Organization of the country of origin, in accordance with the criteria for establishing freedom from pests found in International Standard for Phytosanitary Measures (ISPM) 4: Requirements for the establishment of pest free areas. Additionally, consignments from a pest-free area transiting to a packinghouse or a port through an area not known to be free of regulated pests must be covered with an insect-proof mesh, screen or plastic tarpaulin or otherwise safeguarded from infestation by T. leucotreta or T. absoluta.

The CFIA will review the protocols to establish and maintain pest freedom submitted by the exporting country's NPPO as per International Standard for Phytosanitary Measures (ISPM) 29: Recognition of pest free areas and areas of low pest prevalence. The NPPO must demonstrate to the CFIA that the conditions of ISPM 4 are met.

5.4.2 CFIA-accepted systems approach

Fresh pepper and tomato fruit originating from countries where T. leucotreta or T. absoluta are present may be certified for export to Canada if produced in accordance with a CFIA-accepted systems approach. The systems approach must conform to international guidelines as per International Standard for Phytosanitary Measures (ISPM) 14: The use of integrated measures in a systems approach for pest risk management.

As the NPPO of the importing country, the CFIA is responsible for setting and communicating technically justified phytosanitary import requirements to be addressed by the systems approach.

Appendix 2 provides the minimum requirements of a systems approach for the export of fresh tomato fruit from countries where T. absoluta is present. Tomato fruit produced and prepared for export to Canada under a systems approach must be imported without vines, stems, or calyces.

If the NPPO of the exporting country wishes to employ a systems approach, they must submit a proposal to the CFIA. The NPPO must demonstrate the efficacy of the proposed provisions. They must approve and oversee the places of production or production sites that use the integrated measures.

The use of a systems approach offers a preventative risk management alternative to mandatory phytosanitary treatment. It is useful in situations where traditional phytosanitary inspection and certification may be considered ineffective or inefficient.

5.4.3 CFIA-approved treatment

Fresh pepper and tomato fruit may be treated for regulated pests using CFIA-approved products and methods. Refer to Treatment schedules for horticulture commodities for article and pest-specific treatments. Upon request, proposals for alternative treatments will be evaluated for effectiveness by the CFIA.

Note: as a signatory to the Montreal protocol on substances that deplete the ozone layer, Canada is phasing out the use of methyl bromide for quarantine purposes. Exporting countries are encouraged to submit data supporting the efficacy of alternatives to methyl bromide fumigation to the CFIA for review.

6.0 Non-compliance

Imported articles may be inspected by the CFIA and must meet requirements when they reach their first point of arrival in Canada. Articles infested with pests of quarantine concern or are otherwise non-compliant will be refused entry to Canada. Those articles will be ordered removed from the country or destroyed. Infested articles may be ordered treated prior to disposal or removal to prevent the spread of pests. The importer is responsible for costs relating to treatment, disposal or removal of the articles, including costs incurred by the CFIA to monitor the action taken. The CFIA will advise the NPPO of the country of origin or re-export of non-compliance as per directive D-01-06: Canadian phytosanitary policy for the notification of non-compliance and emergency action.

The discovery of quarantine pests or other non-compliance during inspection in Canada may result in suspension of the importation of the commodity from that country. Consultation with the CFIA and remedial action at origin before shipping can resume may be required.

7.0 References

7.1 Fees

The CFIA charges fees in accordance with the Canadian Food Inspection Agency Fees Notice. For information regarding fees, please contact your local CFIA office or visit the CFIA's Fees Notice website.

7.2 Supporting documents

Appendix 1: Summary of phytosanitary requirements for fresh pepper and tomato fruit imported from the world

See Appendix 1: Summary of phytosanitary requirements for fresh pepper and tomato fruit imported from the world

Appendix 2: Minimum requirements for a systems approach for the export to Canada of tomato fruit from countries where Tuta absoluta is present

Fresh tomato fruit from approved countries where Tuta absoluta is present may be imported into Canada provided that the foreign country's NPPO and the CFIA have agreed to a systems approach program intended to mitigate the risk of introducing this pest to Canada.

Foreign NPPOs are required to register production sites and packing facilities and verify that the requirements outlined in this Appendix are met. Only those facilities meeting these requirements may be registered. Only those consignments meeting these requirements may be certified for export to Canada under a systems approach. International Standard for Phytosanitary Measures (ISPM) 14: The use of integrated measures in a systems approach for pest risk management, should serve as guidance in implementing the systems approach for the export of tomato fruit.

Requirements

The systems approach must include all of the following:

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