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Japanese beetle in British Columbia: an ongoing response 2018 to 2023

The Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA), the British Columbia Ministry of Agriculture and Food the cities of Burnaby, Coquitlam, Port Coquitlam, Richmond and Vancouver, along with other industry and non-governmental stakeholders are collaborating on an ongoing response to prevent the spread of Japanese beetle (Popillia japonica) in British Columbia (BC).

Japanese beetle has been found annually in BC since it was first detected in 2017, in the False Creek area of Vancouver. In 2023, it was detected in Burnaby, Port Coquitlam and Vancouver.

The potential consequences of Japanese beetle establishment in BC include severe damage to nurseries, farms, lawns, landscapes, golf courses, gardens and parks, and harm to the province's horticultural and agricultural sectors. The spread of this beetle will result in increased costs to municipalities, industry and the public due to losses and Japanese beetle control measures. Establishment may also result in the loss of BC's Japanese beetle category 1 pest-free status, and industry requirements to set-up and maintain Japanese beetle certification programs.

Report sightings in British Columbia

Notices to industry

Response activities

Movement controls

Apply for a movement certificate (PDF 134 kb)

In 2018, a regulated area was created in response to the 2017 beetle detections in the False Creek area of Vancouver, British Columbia. The regulated area was revised in 2019 and, again, in 2022 based on surveillance data collected by the CFIA.

On May 5, 2023, Japanese beetle regulated areas were created in the cities of Burnaby, Coquitlam, Port Coquitlam and Vancouver, in the province of BC.

Until further notice, the CFIA is restricting the movement of plants with soil and soil-related material attached that is infested or likely to be infested with Japanese beetle, in accordance with the Phytosanitary requirements to prevent the spread of Japanese beetle, Popillia japonica, in Canada and the United States (D-96-15).

A CFIA-issued movement certificate is required to move these items out of the regulated areas. This restriction is in effect year-round, and is intended to reduce the risk of unintentional human-assisted spread of the beetle.

Find out if you are in a Japanese beetle regulated area

Learn more about the CFIA's movement controls

Surveillance

Enhanced trapping plan for Japanese beetle

As a result of the initial 2017 detections of Japanese beetle in the False Creek area of Vancouver and subsequent detections, the CFIA is carrying out enhanced surveillance for Japanese beetle in the lower mainland of British Columbia.

Traps will be concentrated in the areas where Japanese beetle has been found. The surveillance program provides the CFIA and its key stakeholders with more information about the presence and distribution of Japanese beetle in BC.

The traps contain a Japanese beetle attractant which is a combination of a floral lure and a pheromone. The traps and lures do not pose a risk to animals or humans. Anyone who sees a trap is asked not to touch it.

Japanese beetle traps
Image 1: Example of traps used in the Japanese beetle surveillance program.
Table 1. Annual Japanese beetle trapping results in BC
Year Total number of Japanese beetle traps placed Surveillance result
(total number of Japanese beetle detections)
Location(s) of Japanese beetle detections (total number within the municipality)
2023 5191 detection and delimitation traps 644 in 72 traps Burnaby (29)
Port Coquitlam (611)
Vancouver (4)
2022 5928 detection and delimitation traps 201 in 68 traps Burnaby (35)
Port Coquitlam (126)
Richmond (1)
Vancouver (39)
2021 2790 detection and delimitation traps 79 in 45 traps Burnaby (5)
Port Coquitlam (1)
Vancouver (73)
2020 2507 detection and delimitation traps 214 in 39 traps Port Coquitlam (1)
Vancouver (213)
2019 2344 detection and delimitation traps 1157 in 51 traps Vancouver (1157)
2018 2088 detection and delimitation traps 8276 in 98 traps Delta (1)
Vancouver (8275)
2017 1425 detection and delimitation traps 958 in 42 traps Vancouver (958)
2016 505 detection traps No detections No detections
2015 442 detection traps No detections No detections
2014 367 detection traps No detections No detections
2013 278 detection traps No detections No detections
2012 331 detection traps No detections No detections
2011 282 detection traps No detections No detections
2010 545 detection traps No detections No detections

Read the full Japanese beetle survey report for British Columbia

Treatment

The British Columbia Plant Protection Advisory Council conducts an annual risk-analysis of Japanese beetle surveillance results collected by the CFIA to make science-based recommendations for the ongoing response in British Columbia. The council's current recommendations include the treatment of both public and private lands with turf grass and/or landscape beds in and around detection sites.

Province of British Columbia

Given the serious damage that Japanese beetle can do to parks, lawns, golf courses, landscapes and the agriculture industry, the British Columbia Ministry of Agriculture and Food is leading a coordinated effort to eradicate the pest.

The larvicide products (e.g. acelepryn) used to treat for this pest are approved for use in Canada by the Government of Canada's Pest Management Regulatory Agency. Adult Japanese beetles and larvae make contact with or ingest the products while they are feeding.

Learn more about the provincial eradication program: British Columbia Ministry of Agriculture and Food – Japanese Beetle Pest Alert.

Treatment of public lands

During the spring and summer of 2023, treatment of public lands with turf, grass and/or landscape beds in and around areas where Japanese beetle has been detected will be completed.

Information about public land treatment:

Treatment of private property

There is no requirement for the mandatory treatment of private property. The British Columbia Ministry of Agriculture and Food is working with the cities of Burnaby, Port Coquitlam, and Vancouver, along with the landscaping industry, to establish voluntary treatment of private properties located in the vicinity of where Japanese beetle has been detected.

Information about private land treatment:

Members of the Japanese beetle response in British Columbia

Along with the CFIA, these groups are participating in the planning and implementation of the ongoing response to Japanese beetle in British Columbia: