Language selection

Search

What we heard report – Consultation on maximum nutrient values in small ruminant (sheep and goat) feeds

On this page

Introduction

The Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) has embarked on a comprehensive change agenda to strengthen its foundation of legislation, regulatory programs, and inspection delivery. These directions set the context for the renewal of the Feeds Regulations, 1983 (the Regulations).

The goal of modernizing the regulations is to reduce compliance burden and support innovation, while ensuring feeds are safe and contribute to the production and maintenance of healthy livestock, safe foods of animal origin, and that they do not pose a significant risk to the environment. The modernization of the regulations is being designed to benefit the collective Canadian feed industry, which includes livestock producers, commercial feed manufacturers, retailers, importers, exporters, ingredient manufacturers, and food processors. As well as aligning with other international feed regulatory regimes, modernization also maintains the objective of enhancing animal health and food safety for the Canadian public.

The oversight of maximum nutrient values in feeds is just one aspect of the regulations that is being reviewed as part of the comprehensive modernization project. Table 4 of Schedule I was created and incorporated into the Feeds Regulations in the 1980s as a mechanism to exempt certain groups of feeds from registration. Currently, if a complete feed provides nutrients that fall within the ranges listed in Table 4, or a supplement has directions for use that would result in a complete feed that provides nutrients that fall within the Table 4 ranges, the feed can be exempted from registration. Feeds that provide nutrients that fall outside the ranges listed in Table 4 and that do not meet any additional exemption criteria require assessment and registration by the CFIA prior to manufacture and sale.

The values in Table 4 no longer have the same nutritional relevancy that they did when the table was first introduced. Stakeholders have also indicated that they feel Table 4 prevents innovation for new feed products; however, many of the maximum nutrient limits that are currently set in Table 4 have health and safety implications that must be considered.

The CFIA undertook a consultation from July 10, 2018 to August 17, 2018 on a proposal to identify maximum nutrient values in small ruminant (sheep and goat). It was also proposed that Table 4 be removed from the regulations and no longer serve as a trigger for registration of feeds based on specified ranges of nutrient content. Finally, the proposal indicated that these maximum nutrient values would be included in a document to be incorporated by reference in the regulations to allow the flexibility to amend the lists in a timely manner, as necessary.

This report consolidates and summarizes the comments received on the maximum nutrient values in small ruminant (sheep and goat) feeds proposal and the CFIA's response to those comments.

The CFIA would like to thank everyone who participated in the consultation for contributing their time to the consultation process and sharing their views.

About the consultation

The primary mode of consultation involved the preparation and posting of the Proposal – Maximum nutrient values for small ruminant (sheep and goat) feeds on the CFIA website, and outreach directly to industry stakeholders, government partners, and CFIA staff. 7 sets of written comments were received.

What we heard

Respondent profile

Table 1: Respondent profile
Category of respondent Distribution
Feed industry – individual 3
Feed industry – association 2
Livestock producer – individual 0
Livestock producer – association 1
Other feed inputs 0
Governments (Canadian federal/provincial) 1
Total 7

Comments were received from feed industry associations that represent Canadian commercial feed manufacturers and from individuals within the feed industry. The Canadian feed manufacturers associations represent 90% of commercial feeds manufactured in Canada. In addition, comments were received from a livestock producer association and a colleague at the CFIA.

Key respondent messages

While stakeholders provided suggestions for improvement regarding the proposed maximum nutrient values in small ruminant (sheep and goat) feeds, the CFIA did not receive any comments indicating an outright disagreement with the proposed regulatory approach.

Respondents indicated they agreed with the concept of discontinuing the use of Table 4 as a means of exempting feeds from registration; however, they also raised some concerns regarding the proposal, including:

A more detailed discussion on these concerns and the CFIA's responses follows.

Feedback on the proposed maximum nutrient values in small ruminant (sheep and goat) feeds

Scope of the proposal

The scope of the proposal included:

3 respondents commented specifically on the stated scope of this proposal. All respondents provided positive support for the replacement of, or at least changes to, Table 4 values with scientific-based nutrient values, and understood that changes to Table 4 would increase the number of feeds that would not require registration. 1 respondent provided a comment about how removing the minimum levels of nutrients in feeds could be problematic in determining feeds that are suitable for their intended purpose and meet the nutritional requirements if minimum nutrient values are no longer established.

Small ruminant classes and average intakes

The proposal included tables displaying the range of dry matter (DM) intake, and forage intake for various production classes of sheep and goats. 3 respondents provided comments regarding the percentage of forages in the total diet for small ruminants.

No comment was provided with regards to the classes of small ruminants identified in the proposal and the average intakes (range of DM intake) for each class of sheep and goats. However, modifications were made to the tables for small ruminant classes and average intakes to ensure the proposed classes match the proposed maximum nutrient values for each identified class for which a proposed maximum value was established.

Proposed maximum nutrient values in sheep feeds

Macrominerals

Calcium (Ca) and phosphorus (P)

4 respondents provided comments regarding the proposed maximum calcium value for sheep. In all instances, respondents felt the proposed maximum calcium value was too low and should be increased. 3 respondents provided comments regarding the proposed maximum phosphorus value for sheep. In all instances respondents felt the proposed maximum phosphorus value was too low and should be increased.

Nutrient Number of respondents with comments Number in agreement with proposed values Number not in agreement – Summary of feedback
Calcium (Ca) 4 0 4 respondents commented that the maximum nutrient value for calcium is too low and not high enough to account for forages that contain naturally high levels of calcium. Some respondents proposed a maximum nutrient value of 2% for calcium.
Phosphorus (P) 3 0

1 respondent proposed a maximum nutrient value of 0.7% for phosphorus.

2 respondents commented that the maximum nutrient value for phosphorus is low and not high enough to account for by-product feed ingredients that have high levels of phosphorus. These by-product feeds are commonly used in grower and finisher feeds and creep feeds for sheep, and at a high percentage of the total diet. The respondents also mentioned the importance of an appropriate calcium to phosphorus ratio for good nutritional practices. Restricting the amount of by-products may result in a higher amount of waste and an increase in the price of these feeds. The respondents proposed a maximum nutrient value of 1% for phosphorus.

Magnesium, sodium, potassium, and sulfur

4 respondents provided comments regarding the proposed maximum potassium value for sheep. In all instances, respondents felt the proposed maximum potassium value was too low and should be increased. No comment was provided regarding the proposed maximum magnesium, sodium, and sulfur values for sheep.

Nutrient Number of respondents with comments Number in agreement with proposed values Number not in agreement – Summary of feedback
Magnesium (Mg) 0 0 0
Sodium (Na) 0 0 0
Potassium (K) 4 0

1 respondent proposed a maximum nutrient value of 3% for potassium.

3 respondents commented that the maximum nutrient value for potassium is low and not high enough to account for legume forages that have high inherent levels of potassium. 1 respondent proposed a maximum nutrient value of 3% for potassium, while another respondent suggested a maximum nutrient value of 4% for potassium. Higher levels of potassium may result in the magnesium levels needing to be increased.

Sulfur (S) 0 0 0

Trace minerals

Cobalt, copper, iodine, and iron

3 respondents provided comments regarding the proposed maximum nutrient value for cobalt and that the maximum nutrient value for cobalt was too low. 5 respondents provided comments regarding the proposed maximum nutrient value for copper, and most respondents were concerned with the maximum nutrient value for copper being too low. 3 respondents provided comments regarding the proposed maximum nutrient value for iodine. No comment was provided regarding the proposed maximum iron value for sheep.

Nutrient Number of respondents with comments Number in agreement with proposed values Number not in agreement – Summary of feedback
Cobalt (Co) 3 0

2 respondents commented that the maximum nutrient value for cobalt is too low and should be kept at 10 mg/kg in complete feeds (added) until additional information is obtained on the levels of cobalt in feeds and forages before setting a value based on total diet. Worker safety issues for the use of cobalt and cobalt compounds in the workplace are addressed under the Workplace Hazardous Materials Information System (WHMIS) and associated regulations and should not restrict the maximum nutrient value set in feeds. The respondents suggested increasing the proposed maximum value as the U.S. does not have a maximum value for cobalt; therefore, Canadian producers would be at a competitive disadvantage.

1 respondent commented that the maximum nutrient value for cobalt is too low and proposed a maximum nutrient value of 5 mg/kg of total diet DM for cobalt.

Copper (Cu) 4

1 respondent commented that the maximum nutrient value for copper is too low and proposed a maximum nutrient value of 20 mg/kg of total diet DM for copper. Flexibility is needed to accommodate mineral interactions (including sulphur and molybdenum).

2 respondents commented that the maximum nutrient value for copper is too low and proposed a maximum nutrient value of 25 mg/kg of total diet DM for copper. Flexibility is needed to account for elevated sulphur and molybdenum levels that are outside the normal range and can influence copper toxicity and deficiency.

1 respondent expressed concerns in increasing the maximum copper value from the current value and the possibility of an increase in incidences of copper toxicity on farms.

Iodine (I) 3 0

1 respondent proposed a maximum nutrient value of 2.5 mg/kg of total diet DM for lactating sheep and 5 mg/kg of total diet DM for non-lactating sheep.

2 respondents proposed a maximum nutrient value of 2.5 mg/kg (as added) for lactating sheep and 10 mg/kg (as added) for non-lactating sheep to provide greater flexibility in diet formulation when there is limited data on the levels of iodine in feeds. The presence of goitrogenic substances in feeds and other factors (milking practices) influencing high iodine levels in milk should be considered.

Iron (Fe) 0 0 0
Manganese, selenium, and zinc

3 respondents provided comments regarding the proposed maximum nutrient values for manganese and zinc for sheep. In all instances, respondents felt the proposed maximum nutrient values were too low and should be increased. 4 respondents provided comments regarding the proposed maximum value for selenium. 1 respondent felt the proposed maximum selenium value was acceptable, while the other respondents felt the value was too low.

Nutrient Number of respondents with comments Number in agreement with proposed values Number not in agreement – Summary of feedback
Manganese (Mn) 3 0

1 respondent commented that the maximum manganese value is too low and proposed 300 mg/kg of total diet DM for all sheep classes.

2 respondents commented that the maximum manganese value is too low and proposed 300 mg/kg of total diet DM for all sheep classes. Worker safety issues for the use of manganese and manganese compounds in the workplace are addressed under WHMIS and associated regulations and should not restrict the maximum nutrient value set in feeds.

Selenium (Se) 4 1

1 respondent commented that the maximum selenium value is too low and proposed a total of 2 mg/kg of total diet DM for all sheep classes.

2 respondents commented that the maximum selenium value is too low due to the high and variable levels of selenium found in forages and geographical differences in selenium content. They expressed concerns on setting a maximum selenium value based on a "total" diet as opposed to "added" basis, and with the maximum selenium value of 1.0 mg/kg (total) resulting in food safety issues. The two (2) respondents proposed an added 1 mg/kg of total diet DM for all sheep classes.

Zinc (Zn) 3 0

2 respondents commented that the maximum zinc value is too low and proposed 300 mg/kg of total diet DM for all classes of sheep.

1 respondent commented that the maximum zinc value is too low and not high enough to account for forages that contain naturally high levels of zinc.

Vitamins

Vitamin A, vitamin D, and vitamin E

5 respondents provided comments regarding the proposed maximum nutrient values for vitamin A and most respondents expressed concerns that the proposed value was too low. 3 respondents provided comments regarding the proposed maximum nutrient values for vitamin D and expressed concerns that the proposed value was too low. 2 respondents provided general comments regarding the proposed maximum nutrient value for vitamin E in sheep diets.

Nutrient Number of respondents with comments Number in agreement with proposed values Number not in agreement – Summary of feedback
Vitamin A (Vit A) 5 1

2 respondents commented that the maximum nutrient value for vitamin A is too low. The respondents proposed a maximum nutrient value of 65,000 IU/kg of diet DM for lambs for rearing (≤ 2 months old) and 25,000 IU/kg of diet DM for sheep for fattening (≥ 2 months old). Flexibility is needed to account for the current levels of vitamin A in sheep feeds and to encompass current feeding practices (including the use of consultant and customer formula feeds).

1 respondent commented that the maximum nutrient value for vitamin A is too low.

1 respondent commented that the maximum nutrient value for vitamin A is too low to meet the requirements for general health and reproductive functions in sheep.

Vitamin D (Vit D) 3 0

2 respondents commented that the maximum nutrient value for vitamin D is too low. The respondents proposed a maximum nutrient value of 11,000 IU/kg of diet DM for lambs for rearing (≤ 2 months old) and 5,500 IU/kg of diet DM for all other classes of sheep or 4,400 IU/kg of diet for sheep (≥ 2 months old). The respondents proposed different levels for different sheep classes to address concerns of chronic exposure to higher levels of vitamin D. Flexibility is needed to account for the current levels of vitamin D in sheep feeds, encompass current feeding practices and changes in the sheep rearing industry, and different requirements during flushing periods before breeding.

1 respondent commented that the maximum nutrient value for vitamin D is too low.

Vitamin E (Vit E) 2 1 1 respondent commented that the maximum nutrient value for vitamin E is too low.

Proposed maximum nutrient values in goat feeds

Macrominerals

Calcium (Ca) and phosphorus (P)

3 respondents provided comments regarding the proposed maximum calcium value for goats. 2 respondents felt the proposed maximum calcium value was too low and should be increased. 3 respondents provided comments regarding the proposed maximum phosphorus value for goats. 2 respondents felt the proposed maximum phosphorus value was too low and should be increased.

Nutrient Number of respondents with comments Number in agreement with proposed values Number not in agreement – Summary of feedback
Calcium (Ca) 3 1 2 respondents commented that the maximum value for calcium is too low and not high enough to account for forages that contain naturally high levels of calcium. The respondents proposed a maximum value of 2% for calcium.
Phosphorus (P) 3 1 2 respondents commented that the maximum value for phosphorus is low and not high enough to account for by-product feed ingredients that have high levels of phosphorus. These by-product feeds are commonly used in grower and finisher feeds and creep feeds for goats and at a high percentage of the total diet. The respondents also mentioned the importance of an appropriate calcium to phosphorus ratio for good nutritional practices. Restricting the amount of by-products may result in an economic burden to producers. The respondents proposed a maximum value of 1% for phosphorus.
Magnesium, sodium, potassium, and sulfur

3 respondents provided comments regarding the proposed maximum potassium value for goats. In all instances respondents felt the proposed maximum potassium value was too low and should be increased. No comment was provided regarding the proposed maximum magnesium, sodium and sulfur values for goats.

Nutrient Number of respondents with comments Number in agreement with proposed values Number not in agreement – Summary of feedback
Magnesium (Mg) 0 0 0
Sodium (Na) 0 0 0
Potassium (K) 3 0

1 respondent proposed a maximum nutrient value of 2.5% for potassium. Higher levels of potassium may result in the magnesium levels to be increased.

2 respondents commented that the maximum nutrient value for potassium is low and not high enough to account for legume forages that have high inherent levels of potassium. 1 respondent proposed a maximum nutrient value of 3% for potassium, while another respondent suggested a maximum nutrient value of 4% for potassium.

Sulfur (S) 0 0 0

Trace minerals

Cobalt, copper, iodine, and iron

3 respondents provided comments regarding the proposed maximum nutrient value for cobalt and that the maximum nutrient value for cobalt was too low. 3 respondents provided comments regarding the proposed maximum nutrient value for iodine and that the maximum nutrient value for iodine was too low. No comment was provided regarding the proposed maximum nutrient values for copper and iron for goats.

Nutrient Number of respondents with comments Number in agreement with proposed values Number not in agreement – Summary of feedback
Cobalt (Co) 3 0

2 respondents commented that the maximum nutrient value for cobalt is too low and should be kept at 10 mg/kg in complete feeds (added) until additional information is obtained on the levels of cobalt in feeds and forages before setting a value based on total diet. Worker safety issues for the use of cobalt and cobalt compounds in the workplace are addressed under WHMIS and associated regulations and should not restrict the maximum nutrient value set in feeds. The respondents suggested increasing the proposed maximum value as the U.S. does not have a maximum value for cobalt; therefore, Canadian producers would be at a competitive disadvantage.

1 respondent commented that the maximum nutrient value for cobalt is too low and proposed a maximum nutrient value of 3 mg/kg of total diet DM for cobalt.

Copper (Cu) 0 0 0
Iodine (I) 3 0

1 respondent proposed a maximum nutrient value of 3 mg/kg of total diet DM for all goat classes.

2 respondents proposed a maximum nutrient value of 2 mg/kg (as added) for lactating goats and 10 mg/kg (as added) for non-lactating goats to provide greater flexibility in diet formulation when there is limited data on the levels of iodine in feeds and goats have higher iodine requirements. The presence of goitrogenic substances in feeds and other factors, including the inherent presence of iodine and anti-nutrients in different protein sources (animal vs. plant proteins), should be considered

Iron (Fe) 0 0 0
Manganese, selenium, and zinc

3 respondents provided comments regarding the proposed maximum nutrient values for manganese and selenium for goats. In all instances, respondents felt the proposed maximum nutrient values were too low and should be increased. 3 respondents provided comments regarding the proposed maximum zinc value for goats. 2 respondents felt the proposed maximum zinc value was too low and should be increased.

Nutrient Number of respondents with comments Number in agreement with proposed values Number not in agreement – Summary of feedback
Manganese (Mn) 3 0

1 respondent commented that the maximum manganese value is too low and proposed 500 mg/kg of total diet DM for all goat classes.

2 respondents commented that the maximum manganese value is too low and proposed 300 mg/kg of total diet DM for all goat classes. Manganese has a low oral toxicity and levels of manganese are variable in forages and water supplies. Worker safety issues for the use of manganese and manganese compounds in the workplace are addressed under WHMIS and associated regulations and should not restrict the maximum nutrient value set in feeds.

Selenium (Se) 3 0

1 respondent commented that the maximum selenium value is too low and proposed a total of 2 mg/kg of total diet DM for all goat classes.

2 respondents commented that the maximum selenium value is too low due to the high, inconsistent, and variable levels of selenium found in forages and geographical differences in selenium content. The respondents expressed concerns on setting a maximum selenium value based on "total" diet as opposed to "added" basis. They also had concerns with setting a maximum selenium value weighed heavily on food safety risks. They proposed an added 1 mg/kg of total diet DM for all goat classes.

Zinc (Zn) 3 1

1 respondent commented that the maximum zinc value is too low and proposed 300 mg/kg of total diet DM for all classes of goats.

1 respondent commented that the maximum zinc value is too low and proposed 250 mg/kg of total diet DM for all classes of goats, which aligns with the proposed maximum zinc value for other ruminants.

Vitamins

Vitamin A, vitamin D, and vitamin E

3 respondents provided comments regarding the proposed maximum nutrient values for vitamin A, and all respondents expressed concerns that the proposed value was too low. 3 respondents provided comments regarding the proposed maximum nutrient values for vitamin D, and 2 respondents expressed concerns that the proposed value was too low. No comment was provided regarding the proposed maximum vitamin E value for goats.

Nutrient Number of respondents with comments Number in agreement with proposed values Number not in agreement – Summary of feedback
Vitamin A (Vit A) 3 0

2 respondents commented that the maximum nutrient value for vitamin A is too low. They proposed a maximum nutrient value of 65,000 IU/kg of diet DM for kids for rearing (≤ 2 months old) and 25,000 IU/kg of diet DM for goats (≥2 months old). Flexibility is needed to account for the current levels of vitamin A in goat feeds and to encompass current feeding practices.

1 respondent commented that the maximum nutrient value for vitamin A is too low to meet the vitamin requirements of certain goat classes/production phases. The respondent proposed 20,000 IU/kg of diet DM for all goat classes.

Vitamin D (Vit D) 3 1 2 respondents commented that the maximum nutrient value for vitamin D is too low. They proposed a maximum nutrient value of 5,500 IU/kg of diet DM for all classes of goats or 4,400 IU/kg of diet for all classes of goats. The respondents suggested different levels for different classes to address concerns of chronic exposure to higher levels of vitamin D. Flexibility is needed to account for the current levels of vitamin D in goat feeds, encompass current feeding practices (including the use of consultant and customer formula feeds), and different requirements during flushing periods before breeding.
Vitamin E (Vit E) 0 0 0

Additional respondent feedback

3 respondents provided concerns on how CFIA inspection staff will determine compliance when maximum nutrient values are established for the total diet, and not solely established for complete feeds. 3 respondents also provided comments with regards to the maximum levels being flexible to encompass current feeding practices and animal production systems in the minor livestock species industry.

Next steps

The CFIA is preparing a formal regulatory proposal for publication in the Canada Gazette, Part I, which will incorporate the comments received on all the consultation proposals, public meetings, stakeholder workshops and submissions, and other outreach activities that have been used over the course of the project. A draft of the Maximum Nutrient Values in Small Ruminant (Sheep and Goat) Feeds will be available for public review and comment at the time of the Canada Gazette publication.

Appendix I – Proposed maximum nutrient values in sheep feeds

Sheep classes and range of dry matter (DM) intakes

Class Range of DM intake
(% body weight) Table Note 3
Rams 1.6 to 2
Ewes 1.6 to 5
Lambs for rearing (< 2 months old) 1.5 to 6
Market lambs and sheep 1.5 to 6

Table Notes

Table Note 3

Note: DM intake ranges and forage intakes on farms may be below or above these ranges.

Return to table note 3  referrer

Macrominerals

Calcium (Ca)
Class Proposed
(% of the total diet DM)
Revised
(% of the total diet DM)
Sheep (All) 1.5 2
Phosphorus (P)
Class Proposed
(% of the total diet DM)
Revised
(% of the total diet DM)
Sheep (All) 0.6 1
Magnesium (Mg)
Class Proposed
(% of the total diet DM)
Revised
(% of the total diet DM)
Sheep (All) 0.6 0.6
Sodium (Na)
Class Proposed
(% of the total diet DM)
Revised
(% of the total diet DM)
Sheep (All) 1.6 1.6
Potassium (K)
Class Proposed
(% of the total diet DM)
Revised
(% of the total diet DM)
Sheep (All) 2 3
Sulfur (S)
Class Proposed
(% of the total diet DM)
Revised
(% of the total diet DM)
Sheep (All) 0.4 0.4

Trace minerals

Cobalt (Co)
Class Proposed
(mg/kg of the total diet DM)
Revised
(mg/kg of the total diet DM)
Sheep (All) 1 5
Copper (Cu)
Class Proposed
(mg/kg of the total diet DM)
Revised
(mg/kg of the total diet DM)
Sheep (All) 15 15
Iodine (I)
Class Proposed
(mg/kg of the total diet DM)
Revised
(mg/kg of the total diet DM)
Lactating ewes 1.3 2.5
All other sheep classes 2 10
Iron (Fe)
Class Proposed
(mg/kg of the total diet DM)
Revised
(mg/kg of the total diet DM)
Sheep (All) 500 500
Manganese (Mn)
Class Proposed
(mg/kg of the total diet DM)
Revised
(mg/kg of the total diet DM)
Sheep (All) 150 300
Selenium (Se)
Class Proposed
(mg/kg of the total diet DM)
Revised
(mg/kg of the total diet DM)
Sheep (All) 1 (total) 1
Zinc (Zn)
Class Proposed
(mg/kg of the total diet DM)
Revised
(mg/kg of the total diet DM)
Sheep (All) 150 250

Vitamins

Vitamin A
Class Proposed
(IU/kg of the total diet DM)
Revised
(IU/kg of the total diet DM)
Lambs for rearing (< 2 months old) 16,000 65,000
All other sheep classes 10,000 25,000
Vitamin D
Class Proposed
(IU/kg of the total diet DM)
Revised
(IU/kg of the total diet DM)
Lambs for rearing (< 2 months old) 2,200 7,700
All other sheep classes 2,200 4,400
Vitamin E
Class Proposed
(IU/kg of the total diet DM)
Revised
(IU/kg of the total diet DM)
Sheep (All) 1,250 NMS Table Note 4

Table Notes

Table Note 4

NMS = no maximum specified.

Return to table note 4  referrer

Appendix II – Proposed maximum nutrient values for goat feeds

Goat classes and range of dry matter (DM) intakes

Class Range of DM intake (% body weight) Table Note 5
Mature bucks 1.9 to 2.7
Mature does (breeding and lactating) 1.7 to 7.7
Mature does (non-lactating) 1.7 to 5
Market goats 1.5 to 6
Growing kids 2.4 to 6

Table Notes

Table Note 5

Note: DM intake ranges and forage intakes on farms may be below or above these ranges.

Return to table note 5  referrer

Macrominerals

Calcium (Ca)
Class Proposed
(% of the total diet DM)
Revised
(% of the total diet DM)
Goat (All) 1.5 2
Phosphorus (P)
Class Proposed
(% of the total diet DM)
Revised
(% of the total diet DM)
Goat (All) 0.6 1
Magnesium (Mg)
Class Proposed
(% of the total diet DM)
Revised
(% of the total diet DM)
Goat (All) 0.6 0.6
Sodium (Na)
Class Proposed
(% of the total diet DM)
Revised
(% of the total diet DM)
Goat (All) 1.6 1.6
Potassium (K)
Class Proposed
(% of the total diet DM)
Revised
(% of the total diet DM)
Goat (All) 2 3
Sulfur (S)
Class Proposed
(% of the total diet DM)
Revised
(% of the total diet DM)
Goat (All) 0.4 0.4

Trace minerals

Cobalt (Co)
Class Proposed
(mg/kg of the total diet DM)
Revised
(mg/kg of the total diet DM)
Goat (All) 1 5
Copper (Cu)
Class Proposed
(mg/kg of the total diet DM)
Revised
(mg/kg of the total diet DM)
Goat (All) 40 40
Iodine (I)
Class Proposed
(mg/kg of the total diet DM)
Revised
(mg/kg of the total diet DM)
Lactating goats 1.3 2.5
All other goat classes 2 10
Iron (Fe)
Class Proposed
(mg/kg of the total diet DM)
Revised
(mg/kg of the total diet DM)
Goat (All) 500 500
Manganese (Mn)
Class Proposed
(mg/kg of the total diet DM)
Revised
(mg/kg of the total diet DM)
Goat (All) 150 300
Selenium (Se)
Class Proposed
(mg/kg of the total diet DM)
Revised
(mg/kg of the total diet DM)
Goat (All) 1 (total) 1
Zinc (Zn)
Class Proposed
(mg/kg of the total diet DM)
Revised
(mg/kg of the total diet DM)
Goat (All) 150 250

Vitamins

Vitamin A
Class Proposed
(IU/kg of the total diet DM)
Revised
(IU/kg of the total diet DM)
Kids for rearing (≤ 2 months old) 16,000 65,000
All other goat classes 10,000 25,000
Vitamin D
Class Proposed
(IU/kg of the total diet DM)
Revised
(IU/kg of the total diet DM)
Growing kids 2,200 7,700
All other sheep classes 2,200 4,400
Vitamin E
Class Proposed
(IU/kg of the total diet DM)
Revised
(IU/kg of the total diet DM)
Goat (All) 1,250 NMS Table Note 6

Table Notes

Table Note 6

NMS = no maximum specified.

Return to table note 6  referrer

Date modified: