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2022 to 2023 Departmental Plan

From the Minister

Minister of Health

As the Minister of Health, I am pleased to present the Canadian Food Inspection Agency's (CFIA) Departmental Plan for 2022 to 2023.

CFIA is a valued partner in the Health Portfolio. Throughout the COVID-19 pandemic, CFIA continued to fulfill its mandate - and continues to do so - to safeguard Canada's food supply, to protect the health of plants and animals, and to support market access. In fact, the CFIA's important work is spotlighted in the Message from the Interim Clerk on the 28th Annual Report to the Prime Minister on the Public Service of Canada.

Canadians can have confidence that the food on their shelves is safe thanks to the CFIA's ongoing efforts to improve measures to verify the safety of domestic and imported food. In terms of market access, the CFIA supports Government of Canada trade priorities, strengthening relationships with international partners and stakeholders and working to gain, maintain and expand market access, which enhances our economy.

Canadians care about what they eat and making healthy food choices. The CFIA is committed to supporting Health Canada in its work under the Healthy Eating Strategy to finalize front-of-package labelling and restrictions on the commercial marketing of food and beverages to children. The agency is championing food safety and consumer protection initiatives such as combatting food fraud - an issue that can impact consumer trust. Food fraud can introduce health risks when Canadians do not have accurate information about what is in their food.

With the ever-increasing impacts of climate change, managing the risks to plant and animal health will become even more challenging. The CFIA is proactively assessing these risks and will recommend a course of action under the National Adaptation Strategy that the federal government has prioritized.

To protect animal health, the CFIA continues to work to prevent foreign animal diseases from entering Canada. At the same time, the agency is prepared to help contain animal disease outbreaks should they occur. Notably, African swine fever (ASF) - which as of this writing has never been detected in Canada - continues to be on the CFIA's radar. The CFIA is working collaboratively with Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada to execute the Pan-Canadian Action Plan for ASF, a federal, provincial, territorial and industry effort to coordinate and prioritize ASF-related prevention and preparedness work across the country.

CFIA veterinarians are on the forefront of advocating for the prudent use of antimicrobial drugs in livestock animals to prevent antimicrobial resistance (AMR). AMR is complex and evolving, occurring in every country around the world. It is the reason why antibiotics are increasingly less effective in treating infections in both humans and animals. The CFIA is working with federal partners, including Health Canada and the Public Health Agency of Canada, to facilitate access to innovative alternatives to using antimicrobials in livestock production in an effort to keep animals healthy and reduce the need for antimicrobials in animal feed. The CFIA will also move forward with plans to increase information sharing with other countries as part of a global One Health effort to fight AMR.

Preventing and controlling the introduction of plant pests and invasive species in Canada continues to be a priority for the CFIA. The agency works to protect plants - essential to the health of Canadians, our environment, our climate and the global economy - through domestic plant protection measures to limit the introduction and spread of invasive insects and other plant pests.

New technologies and digital business solutions help the CFIA deliver new and better services to Canadians. The CFIA will advance its digital service offering, working to add services to My CFIA - CFIA's online platform - to help industry keep pace with the speed of commerce.

As the CFIA delivers on its important programs, the agency recognizes the importance of diversity and inclusion. In response to the Clerk's Call to Action on Anti-Racism, Equity and Inclusion in the Federal Public Service, the CFIA's leaders are demonstrating their commitment to fostering a diverse and inclusive environment by expanding their own knowledge, taking accountability and leveraging opportunities to expand awareness and healthy discussion among employees.

The CFIA will mark 2 important anniversaries this year. January 2022 is the third anniversary of the Safe Food for Canadians Regulations. These regulations make Canada's food system even safer by focusing on prevention of foodborne illnesses and allowing for faster removal of unsafe food from the marketplace.

Also in 2022, the CFIA will be celebrating its 25th anniversary. The CFIA is to be congratulated on its silver anniversary and the work the CFIA's dedicated employees carry out every day to safeguard the health of Canadians, the environment and the economy.

The Honourable Jean-Yves Duclos, PC, MP
Minister of Health

Plans at a glance

Science is the driving force behind CFIA's mandate to:

CFIA's work enhances the health of Canada's people, the environment, and Canada's economy. To keep pace with the many changes in the domestic and global environment, CFIA will continue consulting with partners at home and abroad regarding its modernization of regulatory frameworks and service delivery models.

CFIA 2025: Building for the Future

Being adaptable and responsive to changes and evolving risks is crucial to the future success of CFIA. The agency is laying out this groundwork by launching CFIA 2025: Building for the Future - a new framework that guides how CFIA will improve how it delivers its mandate. The 2 guiding principles - trusted partnerships and global leader - envision a future of open and transparent scientific information sharing, and pushing the frontier of food safety and plant and animal health in a way that encourages a science-based, globally competitive industry and removes roadblocks to market innovation. The 4 areas of focus are:

Key planning highlights for 2022 to 2023

In 2022 to 2023, CFIA will:

COVID-19 response and recovery

Since the onset of the COVID-10 pandemic, a risk-based approach was used to prioritize front-line services to enable the maximum delivery of CFIA front-line activities. All inspectors that were able to deliver on agency priorities were fully dedicated to these tasks. Additional capacity was secured to ensure that food, plants and animals entering the Canadian food chain or destined for exportation meet the regulatory standards and expectations of trade partners.

In 2022 to 2023, CFIA will continue to explore new ways to carry out regulatory activities including the use of innovative technology to enable virtual inspections. CFIA will also continue to adapt regulatory initiatives to reduce the administrative burden on industry and that further promote trade and commerce. As the pandemic continues to evolve it has reinforced the importance of prioritizing critical activities, such as meat inspection, food safety investigations and recalls, animal-disease investigations, laboratory testing and export certification.

As the world emerges from the pandemic, CFIA will continue to monitor impacts of disruptions and challenges for the agriculture and agri food value chain and continue to work closely with Agriculture and Agri-food Canada, industry stakeholders, and provincial/territorial governments to do its part to both promote an ongoing safe supply of food and to maintain and increase market access for Canadian producers.

Climate change

In 2022 to 2023, CFIA will complete a preliminary climate change risk and vulnerability assessment that will identify adaptation priorities, and support Canada's National Adaptation Strategy and strengthened climate plan - A Healthy Environment and a Healthy Economy.

CFIA will also support the implementation of Climate Science 2050 - a national synthesis undertaken to better understand the breadth of climate change science and knowledge needs that exist in Canada - which will address knowledge gaps on how climate change may impact CFIA's mandate.

At the same time, CFIA has a responsibility and many opportunities to contribute to the Government of Canada's Greening Government Strategy - a strategy where the objective is that the government will transition to net-0 carbon and climate-resilient operations - while also reducing environmental impacts beyond carbon, including on waste, water, and biodiversity. CFIA has committed to concrete targets that will impact future investment plans and operational decisions related to its fleet as well as the construction, maintenance, and operation of CFIA real property, including laboratories.

CFIA recognizes the impact climate change has on every aspect of its mandate and activities, and its significance to Canada's plant and animal resource base as well to changes in the presence of related diseases and pests. As the urgency to combat climate change continues to be at the forefront of Government of Canada's priorities, CFIA recognizes that it has a significant role to play in terms of meeting federal goals and initiatives to support Canada on its way to becoming a resilient, carbon-neutral society.

Gender-based analysis plus and CFIA

Gender-based analysis plus (GBA Plus) is an analytical tool used to assess how CFIA policies, legislation, regulations, programs, services and other initiatives can affect diverse groups. CFIA works with Health Canada and the Public Health Agency of Canada to support GBA Plus assessments when mitigating the health risks associated with specific foods for children, pregnant women, older adults and other populations. In 2022 to 2023, CFIA will continue to incorporate GBA Plus analysis into its decision-making, uphold the Procurement Strategy for Indigenous Business - the Government of Canada's policy to support underrepresented Indigenous businesses with procurement opportunities - and continue to increase awareness through training and education activities.

Open and transparent government

To support open government, CFIA is promoting transparency by creating a list of its information systems to make publically available within a dedicated Data Asset Inventory System. The open government process and system has been enhanced to identify and publish datasets to the public, Open.Canada.ca., more efficiently and effectively. In 2022 to 2023, CFIA will continue to align with Canada's 5th National Action Plan on Open Government and the Government of Canada's Digital Operations Strategic Plan: 2021–2024, enhance its Data Asset Inventory System, and meet requirements to have an established publishing target of its releasable high value datasets. CFIA will also be among the first departments and agencies to be assessed by Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat's (TBS) new Data Maturity Model Assessment. This assessment provides a standard methodology to evaluate the effectiveness of a department's open government program. CFIA will use these results to increase its alignment with TBS's standards. Transparency initiatives help Canadians to make more informed decisions about food, plant and animal products.

Core responsibility: planned results and resources, and key risks

This section contains detailed information on CFIA's planned results and resources for its core responsibility - Safe food and healthy plants and animals. This section also contains information on key risks related to CFIA achieving those results.

Safe food and healthy plants and animals

Description

CFIA is dedicated to safeguarding food, plants, and animals, which enhances the health and well-being of Canada's people, the environment, and Canada's economy.

Planning highlights

The health and safety of Canadians is the driving force behind the design and development of CFIA programs. Through the delivery of its programs, CFIA administers and enforces regulations that aim to mitigate risks to consumers as well as to the health of Canada's plant and animal resources.

With industry, academia, consumers, federal partners and provincial, territorial and municipal organizations, CFIA works to protect Canadians from preventable health risks related to food and zoonotic diseases that affect animals and humans. CFIA works with industry and global partners to improve international standards, fair trade practices and regulatory cooperation to increase market access for Canadian products.

CFIA achieves its objectives by assessing and managing risk; implementing and enforcing regulations; developing and applying new scientific tools and processes; embracing innovation and technology; adopting and promoting science-based international standards; and, collaborating with stakeholders, as appropriate.

Departmental result 1: food sold in Canada is safe and accurately represented to Canadians

Description

Canada is recognized as having 1 of the strongest food safety systems in the world. CFIA designs and delivers programs to ensure that the food Canadians eat is safe, and that industry understands and follows sound rules to produce or import food that is safe and accurately labelled. CFIA's food safety programs aim to mitigate public health risks, prevent hazards in the food supply system and manage any food safety emergencies and incidents by working with industry and federal, provincial, territorial and international food safety partners.

Results achieved

Amendments to the Food and Drug Regulations

CFIA is proposing to incorporate by reference the food compositional standards in the Food and Drug Regulations. Incorporation by reference will create an agile framework, allowing food compositional standards to be maintained and updated in a transparent, timely and efficient manner. The regulations will become more responsive to changes in technology and consumer demand. CFIA expects to pre-publish the proposed regulations in the Canada Gazette, Part I, in fall 2022.

Safe Food for Canadians Regulations

Recognizing the challenges facing some food businesses as result of the COVID-19 pandemic, CFIA has continued its efforts on compliance promotion related to the Safe Food for Canadians Regulations (SFCR) within the manufactured food sector. In 2022 to 2023, CFIA will shift its focus to engagement and education in order to support those manufactured food businesses that have already become licenced and to onboard additional sector stakeholders in complying with SFCR requirements.

Food product innovation

Food product innovation supports economic recovery by streamlining and removing duplicative or outdated requirements for industry. This includes repealing labelling requirements which were previously commodity-specific; updating the definition of a test market food; repealing some standard container sizes; and, incorporating remaining standard container sizes and class names.

CFIA and Health Canada will continue to work closely to align any future labelling changes by coordinating coming-into-force timelines of other proposed regulatory initiatives in an effort to reduce the cumulative burden these changes can pose to industry.

Establishment-based risk assessment (ERA) model for food

CFIA continues to integrate more information about fresh fruits and vegetables, manufactured foods, and imports into the ERA model for food. CFIA aims to further automate the use of the information from the ERA results to allocate inspection resources to higher-risk areas. In 2022 to 2023, CFIA will continue to develop this tool to digitally integrate ERA risk results into operational planning in near real time.

Modernized Slaughter Inspection Program

CFIA is committed to modernizing its slaughter inspection programs in a step-wise fashion. CFIA started modernizing poultry inspection several years ago and hog inspection more recently, and is now undertaking initial explorations into modernizing beef inspection programs. The Modernized Slaughter Inspection Program (MSIP) focuses on CFIA fulfilling its role as a regulatory oversight body with industry as the regulated party; CFIA aligns resources with areas of greatest risks and benefits while industry takes all the appropriate steps to verify food safety and quality.

CFIA aims to implement MSIP-hog in remaining establishments by the end of the 2022 to 2023 fiscal year. The successes and lessons learned from MSIP-hog will form the basis for modernizing CFIA's slaughter inspection program for beef.

Food fraud

Food fraud can expose Canadians to health and safety risks. In addition, food fraud deceives consumers, damages market fairness, and shrinks confidence in the marketplace. In 2022 to 2023, CFIA plans to leverage new technology and tools to further enhance its risk intelligence capacity. This enhancement will help CFIA continue to focus on high-risk commodities, verify industry compliance, and carry out enforcement actions as appropriate. CFIA will continue to work with Health Canada to develop new laboratory methods that detect food adulteration. CFIA will also collaborate with stakeholders ‒ including other government departments ‒ to tackle food fraud, strengthen international partnerships, and represent Canada at international forums for food fraud and food safety. CFIA will continue to raise awareness about food fraud and publish results of its surveillance work, including updates, on its webpage dedicated to food fraud.

Technology-enhanced remote inspection

The COVID-19 pandemic presented a set of circumstances for CFIA to be more innovative in delivering critical services using virtual techniques, such as remote audits and inspections. While travel restrictions are in place, CFIA will continue to use virtual techniques to support market access and safety of imported products where appropriate and needed. Exploratory testing of new technologies is ongoing. In 2022 to 2023, CFIA will develop a more formal policy and plan for recommending and adopting specific technologies for practical application. This plan will be informed by feedback from internal and external participants – CFIA employees as well as industry – about its effectiveness, security of information, health and safety, and trade.

Offshore program activities

CFIA collaborates with other countries' competent authorities and industry to help Canada's trading partners meet Canada's food safety standards and prevent unsafe food entering the marketplace. Through the offshore program, CFIA gathers information and data to better manage risks associated with imported foods.

In 2022 to 2023, to address food safety risks at the source, CFIA will continue to conduct the following offshore program activities virtually, as appropriate:

Departmental result 2: plant and animal resources are protected from diseases and pests and are safe for Canadians and the environment

Description

CFIA is mandated to protect Canada's plant and animal resources from pests and diseases. CFIA's plant and animal programs aim to prevent the incursion of foreign plant pests and animal diseases, and to contain plant pests and animal diseases should they enter Canada. In close collaboration with its North American and international partners, CFIA works within its mandate to mitigate risks to plant and animal resources. CFIA remains at the forefront of responding to a changing climate, rapid technological advancements, and scientific breakthroughs while ensuring its services remain reliable and relevant.

Results achieved

Regulatory amendments
Did you know

CFIA remains committed to shifting from traditional prescriptive regulations to more preventive and outcome-based regulations that can adapt, as appropriate, to a dynamic environment.

Canada's regulatory systems must adapt to keep pace with emerging threats, risks, and challenges and enable industry to make informed risk management choices. In 2022 to 2023, CFIA plans to advance the following important regulatory proposals:

Establishment-based risk assessment models – hatcheries, feed mills, renderers

In 2022 to 2023, CFIA will develop the Information Management and Information Technology (IMIT) Solution so that ERA model risk results for hatcheries are digitally integrated into planning efforts. The IMIT Solution will support near real-time application of the model results, contributing to CFIA's efficiency and responsiveness to food safety risks.

CFIA will plan and initiate the implementation of the ERA model for feed mills and complete the development and performance assessment of the ERA model for renderers. By assessing both animal health and food safety risks associated with feed establishments, these models will help CFIA design programs, prioritize inspection activities, and manage resources according to risk. This approach will contribute to feed safety and protect the animal industry and the food chain.

Antimicrobial resistance
Did you know

With Budget 2021, the Government of Canada invested $7.5 million over 5 years and $800,000 ongoing for CFIA activities supporting Antimicrobial Use Stewardship.

In 2022 to 2023, CFIA will continue working with domestic and international partners, other federal government departments, provincial and territorial governments, and industry stakeholders with a One Health lens to address the serious and growing public health threat of Antimicrobial resistance (AMR). Specifically, CFIA will continue to work with Health Canada and industry on Antimicrobial Use (AMU) Stewardship, a key pillar of the pan-Canadian Framework for Action to Tackle AMR, in order to:

African swine fever

African swine fever (ASF) is a disease that can affect both domestic pigs and invasive wild pigs. Detection of ASF in Canada could have significant consequences for domestic Canada's pork industry and the business sectors supporting it. Federal, provincial, territorial and industry stakeholders work together to maintain a robust pan-Canadian action plan. In 2022 to 2023, CFIA will:

Did you know

The Canadian pork industry comprises 7,650 farms and 26 federal processing facilities which creates about 100,000 jobs, and contributes $28 billion to the economy each year. Through preparation and mitigation where needed, CFIA works to keep potential disease outbreaks - such as African swine fever - out of Canada.

CFIA has led activities to prevent, prepare for, and manage the risk of introducing ASF into Canada by air travellers. Assessing potential pathways through which ASF could be introduced and identifying measures to mitigate these pathways is a key activity for CFIA. Several studies have shown that understanding the correlation between the movement of air passengers and contraband pork products would provide additional knowledge to improve biosecurity at Canada's borders. In 2022 to 2023, CFIA will work on a mathematical model to better understand, and therefore be able to better mitigate, the risks posed by inadvertently and illegally imported pork products by air travellers.

Community science

Community science, which encourages the public to join scientific professionals in addressing scientific issues, represents a new fundamental component of robust and integrated surveillance and disease response programs. In 2022 to 2023, CFIA will expand its community science efforts by collaborating with the Canadian Wildlife Health Cooperative to develop a process by which community members can report wild pig sightings. Wild pigs are potential carriers of ASF and can be challenging to locate – CFIA anticipates developing new diagnostic tools to support surveillance and response activities. Improved knowledge of their numbers and movements will allow CFIA to better assess and mitigate the potential role of wild pigs in ASF transmission within farmed and wild populations.

Potato Wart Long Term Management Plan

In 2022 to 2023, CFIA will continue revising the Potato Wart Long Term Management Plan and modernize its approach to potato wart detections outside of the province of Newfoundland and Labrador. This work will continue in cooperation with the province of Prince Edward Island and potato sector stakeholders.

CFIA will implement new approaches to potato wart management to maintain enhanced risk mitigation measures for pest movement within Canada and to support exports. These will not only support international obligations under the International Plant Protection Convention, but will help maintain national confidence in CFIA's management and control efforts.

Canadian Plant Health Information System

In 2022 to 2023, the CFIA-led Canadian Plant Health Information System (CPHIS) will launch online environments for collaboration, expertise mapping, and environmental horizon scanning. These new virtual environments will improve information sharing amongst plant health communities, advancing 1 of the key action areas identified in the Plant and Animal Health Strategy for Canada. As a result, CFIA and its CPHIS partners will be better able to identify and respond to plant health issues that pose economic or safety risks to Canadians.

The Plant and Animal Health Strategy for Canada

The Plant and Animal Health Strategy for Canada provides a national vision to proactively address risks to the health of the plant and animal resource base through collaborative partnerships. Planned priorities for the Canadian Plant Health Council in 2022 to 2023 include:

These priorities will be delivered in part via the CPHIS, which will provide a virtual space for collaboration, expertise mapping, and environmental horizon scanning for partners involved in plant health activities.

Did you know

Climate change will have a profound impact on plant health, potentially affecting important Canadian industries like forestry and agriculture. In 2022 to 2023, CFIA will join forces with over 10 different countries to help develop and implement the International Plant Protection Convention's action plan on climate change; raising international awareness of the impacts of climate change on plant health.

CFIA launched its plant health science mobilization plan in 2021. Through a collaborative approach, the plan advances scientific discoveries, innovations and applications as they relate to deliverables within the Plant and Animal Health Strategy for Canada. The plan's action-oriented approach will advance plant health science through collaboration and informed decision-making, strengthen Canada's position as a global leader in plant health protection.

In 2022 to 2023, CFIA will continue to collaborate with the National Farmed Animal Health and Welfare Council (now known as Animal Health Canada) to implement elements of the Plant and Animal Health Strategy for Canada. This future-oriented shift towards better coordinating animal health priorities between CFIA, industry, and provincial and territorial partners, will benefit Canadians as this model fosters collaboration and clear accountabilities of all partners involved based on their areas of authority and mandate.

Sidney Laboratory (Centre for Plant Health)

Laboratories Canada, announced in Budget 2018, is a 25-year strategy to renew the Government of Canada's science infrastructure. CFIA is a key partner in this initiative, which is led by Public Services and Procurement Canada. CFIA is the lead for the Regulatory and Security Science hub and the redevelopment of Sidney Laboratory in Sidney, British Columbia. Also known as the Sidney Centre for Plant Health, the Sidney Laboratory is a pathfinder project for Laboratories Canada that will inform future science infrastructure projects. Construction of a modernized research facility is set to commence in 2022 to 2023, with an anticipated completion date of 2025.

Digitalization Strategy for Plant and Animal

The Plant and Animal Digitalization Strategy establishes the vision for digital service delivery of plant and animal programs and services to Canadians, and the use of data to support CFIA risk oversight and resource allocation. Providing user-focused digital service to Canadians and connected, real-time data to CFIA managers is central to more effective and effective risk management and utilization of CFIA resources. Digital service delivery underpins Canada's competitive edge in agricultural production and the trade of plant and animal products at home and internationally.

Plant and animal health risk intelligence and early warning

Protecting the health of plants and animals in Canada is a shared responsibility between federal, provincial and territorial governments and the industries they regulate. Risk intelligence and the interpretation of early warning signals help prevent plant and animal health risks before they affect the health of Canadians and the economy. In 2022 to 2023, CFIA will:

Did you know

Spotted lanternfly (Lycorma delicatula), native to Asia, is a potential threat to Canadian industries such as the grape, fruit tree, and forestry industry. In 2022 to 2023, CFIA will work with partners to raise awareness about this pest of concern, support early detection and develop collaborative response plans should spotted lanternfly be detected in Canada.

Departmental result 3: Canadian food, plants and animals and their associated products can be traded internationally

Description

As a science-based regulator, CFIA advances Canadian trade and promotes and supports Canadian businesses' access to international markets interests, while protecting the Canadian public and the environment from environmentally harmful products and foreign and domestic pests, diseases, and food safety risks. CFIA is responsible for administering and enforcing legislation related to the import and export of food, plant and animal products. Canada's regulatory system for food safety and the protection of its plant and animal resource base is respected around world. CFIA's science-based approach earns the trust and confidence of other countries in Canada's systems and is the foundation for advancing market access for Canada's agricultural exports.

Results achieved

Market access support
Did you know

Canadians trading plants, plant products, and related items online, even for home use, are importers and exporters. To avoid bringing products harmful to our natural resources and economy into Canada, make sure you know the rules before ordering plants, plant products or living organisms.

Challenges in the global trade environment include trade uncertainty and protectionism, shifting consumer preferences, plant and animal diseases, and an increase in new and complex regulatory requirements. These challenges have affected the export of Canadian commodities to several markets. CFIA provides the technical expertise needed to facilitate the opening, re-opening, expansion and maintenance of markets, within its mandate, while advancing issues related to food safety, plant and animal health, and organic products.

In 2022 to 2023, CFIA will continue to:

International standard setting

CFIA actively participates in international forums to contribute to, and influence, the development of international standards for food safety, consumer protection and fair practices in food trade, plant and animal health, and international trade rules that are consistent with Canada's objectives. These activities promote harmonization and facilitate predictable trade based on transparent rules.

In 2022 to 2023, CFIA will continue to:

International regulatory cooperation and collaboration

CFIA collaborates with other countries to help advance international regulatory- and science-based initiatives. This collaboration means that Canada's regulatory systems are accepted internationally; regulatory and bilateral relationships are established and maintained; and any associated risks are mitigated.

In 2022 to 2023, CFIA will continue to provide leadership and work with:

Biosafety Level 4 Zoonotic Laboratory Network (BSL4Znet)

The Biosafety Level 4 Zoonotic Laboratory Network (BSL4ZNet) is a network of government organizations, led by CFIA, dedicated to strengthening international coordination for pandemic preparedness and response. In 2022 to 2023, BSL4ZNet will leverage lessons learned from the COVID-19 pandemic to identify and engage in opportunities to enhance Canada's capacity for rapid diagnostics, personnel training, and research into zoonotic pathogens. In fall 2022, CFIA will also host the third annual BSL4ZNet International Conference in bringing together multidisciplinary experts in research, academia, government, industry, and non-profit organizations to address priority issues. These efforts will enhance Canada's ability to protect Canadians during emergencies linked to zoonotic pathogens, such as COVID-19.

Gender-based analysis plus

CFIA will continue to incorporate GBA Plus analysis into its decision-making to better understand how its regulations, programs, and services could affect underrepresented and vulnerable populations.

In 2022 to 2023, CFIA will:

Reconciliation with Indigenous peoples in Canada

CFIA recognizes the relationship between its mandate to safeguard the food supply and plant and animal health and the importance of these resources to Indigenous peoples' spirituality, traditions and ways of life. This includes their right to use and conserve traditional resources, now and for future generations.

To advance reconciliation in 2022 to 2023, working in-step with departments and agencies across the Government of Canada including Crown-Indigenous Relations and Northern Affairs Canada, CFIA will:

United Nations (UN) 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development and the UN Sustainable Development Goals

In September 2015, Canada and 192 other UN Member States adopted the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development. The 2030 Agenda is a 15-year global framework centred on 17 sustainable development goals (SDGs), and envisions a secure world free of poverty and hunger, with full and productive employment, access to quality education and universal health coverage, gender equality, empowerment of all women and girls, and an end to environmental degradation. It is a universal call to action, implicating both developing and developed countries, to end poverty and other deprivations around the world.

CFIA's planned activities under its core responsibility "Safe food and healthy plants and animals" support Canada's efforts to address the sustainable development goals.

To support the Zero Hunger Goal (SDG 2), CFIA, in cooperation with provincial and territorial governments and industry associations, sets policies and verifies regulatory compliance aiming to: prevent food safety incidents; reduce the risks associated with diseases and toxic substances that may affect animals or that may be transmitted by animals to people; and protect plant resources from threats such as diseases, pests and invasive species.

Through the surveillance and control of terrestrial and aquatic animal diseases, CFIA protects public health and supports the Good Health and Well-Being Goal (SDG 3) as some of these diseases may be transmitted to humans (zoonotic).

By establishing and enforcing fertilizer and supplement registrations and safety standards, CFIA supports the Good Health and Well-being Goal (SDG 3) and Clean Water and Sanitation Goals (SDG 6).

CFIA reinforces the shared responsibility of managing invasive species in nature and supports the Responsible Consumption and Production Goal(SDG 12) through outreach and awareness activities and campaigns.

In support of Climate Action Goal (SDG 13), CFIA is assessing its institutional climate change risks and identifying ways to manage climate-driven risks to its mandated activities. Through this activity, the CFIA aims to better understand the wide range of climate change impacts that could potentially affect its assets, services and operations across the country. Thereafter, CFIA will prioritize integrating and 'mainstreaming' climate change measures into national policies, strategies and planning. The preliminary assessment will be completed in 2022 to 2023.

By promoting compliance and carrying out enforcement activities, CFIA is minimizing the spread and introduction of invasive species that affect Canada's plant and environmental resources, contributing to the Life on Land Goal (SDG 15).

CFIA has been a voluntary participant in the Federal Sustainable Development Strategy (PDF - 8,590 kb) (FSDS) since 2010. The FSDS is the Government of Canada's primary vehicle for sustainable development planning and reporting. It sets out sustainable development priorities and establishes goals and targets. The 2019 to 2022 FSDS (PDF - 8,590 kb) presents the Government of Canada's sustainable development activities, as required by the Federal Sustainable Development Act. In keeping with the objectives of the act to make environmental decision making more transparent and accountable to Parliament, CFIA supports the implementation of the 2019 to 202022 FSDS through the activities under its 2020 to 2023 Departmental Sustainable Development Strategy.

Experimentation

As a science-based regulator, CFIA recognizes the need to continually test assumptions and experiment with novel approaches to existing and new problems within its mandate. CFIA continues to apply this approach and culture into the program design and delivery areas, ultimately modernizing the way CFIA works.

Some examples of experiments at CFIA include the following:

Innovative Solutions Canada

The Innovative Solutions Canada (ISC) program is designed to stimulate the growth of Canadian small businesses, while providing federal departments and agencies with the latest and most innovative products and services to help deliver programs to Canadians. In 2022 to 2023, CFIA will award up to $1.3 million in funding to launch new, as well as continue ongoing, challenge and testing innovation opportunities. This includes a new challenge to develop a novel robotic surveillance tool to help identify cattle with increased risk of bovine tuberculosis; a chronic contagious bacterial disease of livestock that can be transmitted from affected animals to people.

CFIA will also explore ways to help Canadian small businesses have their prototypes tested by the federal government in real-life settings. These innovations will help equip CFIA, industry, and remote communities with tools to safeguard food, plants and animals, and to enhance the health and well-being of Canada's people, the environment, and Canada's economy.

Enabling competitiveness and innovation

As part of its 2019 Agri-food and Aquaculture Regulatory Review Roadmap commitment, CFIA sought input from the public in 2021 on how the agency could position itself to better support competitiveness and innovation for the agriculture and agri-food sector. Results from this consultation, Framing Competitiveness and Innovation for Success, are expected to be released in 2022 and will help inform CFIA's next steps, including potential areas of investment over the longer term.

Remotely piloted aircraft systems (drones)

In 2022 to 2023, CFIA will continue experimenting with the use of remotely piloted aircraft systems (RPAS, or drones) in conducting appropriate activities. The goal is to compare the RPAS' results with those of standard inspections, noting where RPAS use could increase the efficiency and effectiveness of the plant protection program. In particular, CFIA is assessing the value of using RPAS' for real-time aerial imagery, GPS coordinates, and mapping capabilities. Field testing is ongoing in northern Alberta and the Port of Vancouver.

As part of this initiative, CFIA continues to build on its strong relationships with other government departments and agencies, learning what partners have done, and sharing information on CFIA testing efforts.

Comparative Risk Model

The Comparative Risk Model (CRM) is an analytical tool used to compare the cost-effectiveness of control measures for risks within CFIA's mandate. The CRM simulates the overall performance of risk reduction options; assists in planning and reporting; and provides information and evidence for decisions. As a component of integrated risk management, CFIA is currently updating the data in the CRM, which is an agency-wide initiative, to ensure that the model results are timely and accurate.

In 2022 to 2023, CFIA will be expanding the CRM to include new commodities and risk factors, such as climate change, and will continue to refine the methodology of the model. CFIA will also improve the automation of the CRM data updates, thus providing more efficiencies throughout the agency when identifying, understanding, and addressing emerging risks. To better ensure consistency and risk-informed decision making within the agency, the CFIA will create a platform to facilitate the communication of, and access to, the results produced by the CRM.

Digital Enablement Experimentation Lab

The Digital Enablement Experimentation Lab (DEEL), a specialized unit within CFIA, will test the potential of new technologies as digital business solutions and prepare them for implementation, as appropriate. In 2022 to 2023, CFIA's ongoing digital business solutions include:

Artificial intelligence and machine learning

CFIA continues to experiment with artificial intelligence and statistical learning models to improve business solutions. CFIA's Imagery Seed Classification project is being tested as a way to help identify seed contaminants. Image recognition technologies are also being considered in other program areas where automation could complement existing inspection and testing techniques. CFIA is assessing new advances in virtual assistance and translation services in areas where these might enhance user experience.

Seeking field level innovations

CFIA looks to its workforce for ideas that may benefit from digital business solutions. Participating employees can experiment, test, and develop a solution. This encourages improvements in areas such as providing new or improved services to Canadians, enhancing ways of monitoring and reducing risk to the Canadian food supply chain and plant and animal health, or improving internal processes or availability of information. In 2022 to 2023, CFIA will support 3 field driven innovative ideas as a solution to a business process challenge. CFIA has an open forum where field staff can bring their proposed solutions directly to senior decision makers. The top 3 ideas will have the opportunity to experiment and demonstrate its proof of concept. Results from 2021 to 2022 have demonstrated benefits in efficiencies and effectiveness within the delivery of inspection services. CFIA is anticipating a similar outcome for 2022 to 2023.

Key risks for core responsibility: safe food and healthy plants animals

Key risk: climate change

Climate change continues to accelerate and affect Canada in many ways – from fires, floods, and drought in the west to storms with increasing intensity in the east and thawing permafrost in the north.

Climate change touches on every aspect of CFIA's mandate and can, for example, significantly impact Canada's plant and animal resource base as well as contribute to changes in the presence of related diseases and pests. Critical CFIA infrastructure, such as laboratories, can be both directly impacted by extreme weather events as well as indirectly impacted by, for example, construction labour availability and supply chain issues for certain materials and equipment. CFIA recognizes that it has a significant role to play in terms of meeting Greening government commitments, and that meeting these commitments will require planning and investments.

CFIA's planned risk mitigation strategies include:

Key risk: globalization

Global supply chains have changed the way products are produced, processed, packaged, distributed and sold. At the same time, global consumer preferences are changing the volume and variety of products entering and leaving Canada. Combined, these factors increase the complexity of delivering CFIA's mandate related to safe food and protection of the plant and animal resource base. In addition, the Government of Canada's economic priorities are expected to lead to a significant increase in agri-food exports. CFIA has a critical role in laying the ground work operationally and strategically so that these priorities can be realized and risks minimized.

CFIA's planned risk mitigation strategies include:

Key risk: asset management

CFIA's asset base, which includes laboratories, quarantine and inspection stations, scientific equipment, a fleet, and information management and information technology assets are critically important to support effective program delivery and ultimately to deliver CFIA's mandate. Consistent with the findings of Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat's recently released Horizontal Fixed Asset Review, the need for CFIA to transform and improve the management of its real property is apparent. Aging infrastructure and equipment, combined with many years of deferred maintenance, technological advancements, and new Government of Canada priorities, such as greening government operations, have highlighted the need for strategic management of CFIA's assets.

CFIA's planned risk mitigation strategies include:

Planned results for safe food and healthy plants and animals

The following table shows, for safe food and healthy plants and animals, the planned results, the result indicators, the targets and the target dates for 2022 to 2023, and the actual results for the 3 most recent fiscal years for which actual results are available.

Planned results for safe food and healthy plants and animals
Departmental results Performance indicators Target Date to achieve target 2018 to 2019 actual results 2019 to 2020 actual results 2020 to 2021 actual results
Departmental result 1:
food sold in Canada is safe and accurately represented to Canadians
Percentage of food establishments that have addressed compliance issues upon follow-up or were brought into compliance, by year 75% to 85% March 31, 2023 Not available Table note1 Not available Table note1 Not available
Percentage of higher risk food recalls that occurred prior to an adverse effect being reported to CFIA, by year 84% March 31, 2023 Not available Table note1 Not available Table note1 Not available Table note1
Percentage of Canadians who agree that CFIA helps ensure that food sold in Canada is safe, by year At least 70% March 31, 2023 Not available Table note1 Not available Table note1 Not available Table note1
Departmental result 2:
plant and animal resources are protected from diseases and pests and are safe for Canadians and the environment
Number of harmful foreign plant pests that have entered and established themselves in Canada, by year 0 March 31, 2023 0 3 2
Percentage of regulated, harmful foreign plant pests that had previously entered and established in Canada and whose spread was successfully limited by CFIA control programs, by year At least 95% March 31, 2023 Not available Table note1 Not available Table note1 Not available Table note1
Percentage of plant inputs, products and by-products that comply with Canadian regulations and relevant international agreements, by year At least 95% March 31, 2023 92.2% 92.3% 92.2%
Percentage of animal inputs, products and by-products that comply with Canadian regulations and relevant international agreements, by year At least 95% March 31, 2023 Not available Table note1 Not available Table note1 Not available Table note1
Percentage of Canadian producers that have maintained or improved their status in programs designed to protect the health of animals, by year At least 95% March 31, 2023 Not available Table note1 Not available Table note1 Not available Table note1
Rate of confirmed animal disease outbreaks per 100 investigations conducted by CFIA to limit the impact of animal health diseases within Canada, by year Less than 3 March 31, 2023 Not available Table note1 Not available Table note1 Not available Table note1
Departmental result 3:
Canadian food, plants and animals and their associated products can be traded internationally
Number of international markets that are opened or maintained based on CFIA activities, by year 75 March 31, 2023 Not available Table note1 Not available Table note1 Not available Table note1

Planned budgetary financial resources for safe food and healthy plants and animals

The following table shows, for safe food and healthy plants and animals, budgetary spending for 2022 to 2023, as well as planned spending for that year and for each of the next 2 fiscal years.

Planned budgetary financial resources for safe food and healthy plants and animals
2022 to 2023 budgetary spending (as indicated in Main Estimates) 2022 to 2023 planned spending 2023 to 2024 planned spending 2024 to 2025 planned spending
666,566,722 666,566,722 627,137,232 568,156,209

Planned human resources for safe food and healthy plants and animals

The following table shows, in full‑time equivalents, the human resources the CFIA will need to fulfill this core responsibility for 2022 to 2023 and for each of the next 2 fiscal years.

Planned human resources for safe food and healthy plants and animals
2022 to 2023 planned full-time equivalents 2023 to 2024 planned full-time equivalents 2024 to 2025 planned full-time equivalents
5,300 5,005 4,733

Financial, human resources and performance information for CFIA's program inventory is available in the GC InfoBase.

Internal Services: planned results

Description

Internal Services are groups of related activities and resources that the federal government considers to be services in support of programs and/or required to meet an organization's corporate obligations. Internal Services refers to the activities and resources of the 10 distinct services that support program delivery in the organization, regardless of how they are delivered in a department. These services are:

Planning highlights

Human resources

CFIA supports its workforce and is committed to fostering a work environment where everyone is treated with respect and dignity.

In support of initiatives within the broader public service and the Clerk of the Privy Council's call to action on anti-racism, equity and inclusion, CFIA will continue to work towards achieving a diverse workforce that is representative of the Canadians it serves and supporting a culture of inclusiveness. There will be a specific focus on increasing the representation, appointments and leadership development of diverse groups as well as initiatives to support the career advancement and development of racialized employees. CFIA will continue to explore opportunities to partner with other government departments and support public service programs and initiatives relating to diversity and inclusion.

In addition, in 2022 to 2023 CFIA will finalize a Diversity, Equity and Inclusion Strategy and Action Plan, and as required under the Accessible Canada Act, an Accessibility Strategy and Action Plan. CFIA's vision is to create a fully accessible, respectful, and inclusive workplace that values and enables persons with disabilities.

As the COVID-19 pandemic and subsequent easing of restrictions and public health measures continues to be a reality across the country and around the world, CFIA will continue to support its employees and key stakeholders as it transitions to a hybrid work model, including adapting human resources policies and procedures. The focus on the mental health and well-being of its workforce also remains a priority for CFIA and the public service. CFIA will continue its work with bargaining agents to focus on sustaining the wellness and well-being of employees through the delivery and promotion of mental health programs and services. Plans are also underway to update CFIA's mental health strategy, which forms part of the occupational health and safety program.

CFIA will continue to emphasize core human resources service delivery in staffing and recruitment to achieve a representative workforce that supports CFIA's mandate of safeguarding Canada's food, plants, and animals. Efforts in 2022 to 2023 will concentrate on recruiting veterinarians, scientists, and employment equity groups. CFIA will also focus on implementing initiatives to effective human resources planning that will support managers in their recruitment and retention activities.

Enhancing project and program management

CFIA continues to strengthen its investment and project management governance, competency and capacity in accordance to the Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat (TBS) Policy on the Planning and Management of Investments and the TBS Directive on the Management of Projects and Programs.

In order to leverage lessons learned since the onset of the pandemic and pivot to CFIA's new operating reality, the agency will need to develop a long term vision for investments as well as develop strategies in each of CFIA's asset portfolios (real property, IMIT, fleet and scientific equipment).

In 2022 to 2023, CFIA will create a Project Management Development Program (PMDP) to assess and improve the skills, knowledge and experience of project management professionals and ensure alignment between their level of qualifications and the risk and complexity of projects. The program will provide a structured career path, defined learning curriculum and professional experience opportunities with the goal of creating a pool of accredited project managers.

CFIA will also advance processes and tools that will strengthen its investment planning and Enterprise Project Management Frameworks, including: strengthened data analysis and reporting; adoption of agile methodologies; and, enhanced focus on performance measurement and benefits realization. Well-managed projects and programs will ultimately contribute to the CFIA's capacity to effectively deliver its day-to-day work on behalf of Canadians.

Digital enablement

CFIA continues to oversee the response to the COVID-19 pandemic alert, shifting its priorities in line with the Government of Canada to accelerate IT delivery to quickly support the federal workforce undertaking critical work. A large number of employees continue to be able to work remotely, and inspection staff continue their work while minimizing risk and physical contact.

CFIA continues to adopt new ways of using data to support management in making decisions on risk and collecting information to support a more effective system of tracking and deploying resources to support critical priorities. In 2022 to 2023, CFIA will continue to enhance digital enablement by:

Applications modernization

Delivery of CFIA's programs and services increasingly depends on IT applications and platforms. CFIA is working to digitize inspections and services. Through Budget 2019, the Government of Canada proposed funding and legislative revisions so that regulatory departments and agencies can create more user-friendly regulatory systems. This funding included $27.2 million over 5 years, starting in 2019 to 2020, for CFIA to continue digitizing its export certification activities. This is in line with the Government of Canada's commitment to provide Canadians with reliable, accessible, and secure services that are seamless and digitally enabled.

In 2022 to 2023 CFIA will build on efforts made to date, notably:

In addition, CFIA will prepare critical business applications for migration to Shared Services Canada enterprise data centres. This activity will modernize a number of critical databases and position them for a more seamless migration.

Interactive dashboard for chronic wasting disease in cervids

Interactive, easy-to-use online dashboards allow CFIA to share timely, comprehensive geospatial information on animal demographics and disease findings at regional and national levels. Building on the success of the Equine Disease Dashboard introduced in 2019 to 2020 for the integration, mapping and publishing of equine disease information, CFIA will focus efforts in 2022 to 2023 to develop a similar dashboard for chronic wasting disease in cervids. This new dashboard will help CFIA and other interested parties identify issues and discuss solutions to enhance the integration and effectiveness of animal disease surveillance and disease control programs for chronic wasting disease in Canada.

Alternative service delivery

CFIA is committed to continuously improving how it delivers its mandate, particularly in light of growing demand for programs and services driven by increased domestic and international trade, technological innovation, and foreign pests and diseases. In 2022 to 2023, CFIA will begin to examine its suite of program policies and tools with a goal to improve the design and management of alternative service delivery models, as it is a key enabler for success in delivering CFIA's mandate.

Integrated national real property portfolio strategy

TBS released the Horizontal Fixed Asset Review Final Report in the fall of 2020 and the new Directive on the Management of Real Property in May 2021. The Directive will come into effect in May 2022. The scope of the real property strategy has broadened to also include all elements required for sound real property management to integrate program requirements and developing implementation plans. This will ensure that the management of real property within CFIA reflects balanced risks, benefits and returns to CFIA and the Government of Canada. Development of the strategy will continue into the 2022 to 2023 fiscal year and implementation will be over the long term.

Agency security plan

To continue achieving its strategic objectives and priorities, CFIA is committed to sustaining and improving the security framework in an environment where threats are evolving. The CFIA Security Plan 2020 to 2023 has been updated to respond to changes in the risk environment brought about by the COVID-19 pandemic. CFIA will continue its security programming and activities in alignment with the Policy on Government Security and related policies and directives to ensure the safety and protection of its employees, agency information, and assets.

Planned budgetary financial resources for Internal Services

The following table shows, for Internal Services, budgetary spending for 2022 to 2023, as well as planned spending for that year and for each of the next 2 fiscal years.

Planned budgetary financial resources for Internal Services
2022 to 2023 budgetary spending (as indicated in Main Estimates) 2022 to 2023 planned spending 2023–24 planned spending 2024–25 planned spending
171,249,967 171,249,967 167,810,691 164,509,952

Planned human resources for Internal Service

The following table shows, in full‑time equivalents, the human resources the department will need to carry out its Internal Services for 2022 to 2023 and for each of the next 2 fiscal years.

Planned human resources for Internal Service
2022 to 2023 planned full-time equivalents 2023–24 planned full-time equivalents 2024–25 planned full-time equivalents
1,055 1,055 1,055

Spending and human resources

This section provides an overview of the department's planned spending and human resources for the next 3 consecutive fiscal years and compares planned spending for the upcoming year with the current and previous years' actual spending.

Planned spending

Departmental spending 2019-20 to 2024-25. The following graph presents planned (voted and statutory) spending over time.

Planned spending graph. Description follows.
Description for planned spending graph
- 2019 to 2020 2020 to 2021 2021 to 2022 2022 to 2023 2023 to 2024 2024 to 2025
Statutory 135 116 166 150 146 143
Voted 617 693 678 688 649 590
Total 752 810 847 838 795 733

Budgetary planning summary for core responsibilities and Internal Services (dollars)

The following table shows information on spending for each of CFIA's core responsibility and for its Internal Services for 2022 to 2023 and other relevant fiscal years.

Budgetary planning summary for core responsibilities and Internal Services (dollars)
Core responsibilities and Internal Services 2019 to 2020 expenditures 2020 to 2021 expenditures 2021 to 2022 forecast spending 2022 to 2023 budgetary spending (as indicated in main estimates) 2022 to 2023 planned spending 2023 to 2024 planned spending 2024 to 2025 planned spending
Safe food and healthy plants and animals 605,995,371 645,590,510 676,481,984 666,566,722 666,566,722 627,137,232 568,156,209
Subtotal 605,995,371 645,590,510 676,481,984 666,566,722 666,566,722 627,137,232 568,156,209
Internal Services 146,271,373 163,973,109 170,056,521 171,249,967 171,249,967 167,810,691 164,509,952
Total 752,266,744 809,563,619 846,538,505 837,816,689 837,816,689 794,947,923 732,666,161

CFIA is forecasting an increase in spending for 2021 to 2022, primarily due to investments in CFIA for its core services and the construction of the new Centre for Plant Health in Sidney, British Columbia.

The planned spending for fiscal year 2022 to 2023 is slightly less than the forecast spending for fiscal year 2021 to 2022. This reduction is primarily due to the temporary funding received to maintain inspection capacity during COVID-19 pandemic.

Planned human resources

The following table shows actual, forecast and planned full-time equivalents (FTEs) for each core responsibility in CFIA's departmental results framework and to Internal Services for the years relevant to the current planning year.

Human resources planning summary for core responsibilities and Internal Services

Core responsibilities and Internal Services 2018 to 2019 actual full‑time equivalents 2019 to2020 actual full‑time equivalents 2020 to 2021 forecast full‑time equivalents 2022 to 2023 planned full‑time equivalents 2023 to 2024 planned full‑time equivalents 2024 to 2025 planned full‑time equivalents
Safe food and healthy plants and animals 5,097 5,156 5,452 5,300 5,005 4,733
Subtotal 5,097 5,156 5,452 5,300 5,005 4,733
Internal Services 959 1,012 1,158 1,055 1,055 1,055
Total 6,056 6,168 6,610 6,355 6,060 5,788

CFIA is forecasting an increase in FTEs for 2021 to 2022, primarily due to investments in CFIA for its core services.

The planned FTEs for fiscal year 2022 to 2023 is less than the forecast FTEs for fiscal year 2021 to 2022. This reduction is primarily due to the temporary funding received to maintain inspection capacity during COVID-19 pandemic.

Estimates by vote

Information on CFIA's organizational appropriations is available in the 2021 to 2022 Main Estimates.

Future-oriented condensed statement of operations

The future‑oriented condensed statement of operations provides an overview of CFIA's operations for 2021-22 to 2022-23.

The amounts for forecast and planned results in this statement of operations were prepared on an accrual basis. The amounts for forecast and planned spending presented in other sections of the Departmental Plan were prepared on an expenditure basis. Amounts may therefore differ.

A more detailed future‑oriented statement of operations and associated notes, including a reconciliation of the net cost of operations to the requested authorities, are available on CFIA's website.

Future‑oriented Condensed statement of operations for the year ending March 31, 2023 (dollars)

Financial information 2021 to 2022 forecast results 2022 to 2023 planned results Difference (2022 to 2023 planned results minus 2021 to 2022 forecast results)
Total expenses 943,028,000 989,077,000 46,049,000
Total revenues 53,000,000 53,000,000 0
Net cost of operations before government funding and transfers 890,028,000 936,077,000 46,049,000

CFIA is anticipating a 5% increase in total expenses in fiscal year 2022 to 2023 compared to fiscal year 2021 to 2022. This change is mainly due to accrued salary increases as well as funding to maintain CFIA's core services such as increasing capital investment in the Sidney Centre for Plant Health.

Corporate information

Organizational profile

Appropriate minister: The Honourable Jean-Yves Duclos
Institutional head: Siddika Mithani, Ph.D.
Ministerial portfolio: Health
Enabling instrument(s):

Year of incorporation / commencement: 1997

Raison d'être, mandate and role: who we are and what we do

Raison d'être

CFIA is a large science-based regulatory agency with employees working across Canada in the National Capital Region and in 4 operational regions: Atlantic, Québec, Ontario and Western Canada.

CFIA is dedicated to safeguarding food , and animal and plant health, which enhances Canada's environment, economy, and the health and well-being of its people. Additionally, to support market access, CFIA works with Canada's trading partners to verify that Canadian products meet importing countries' technical requirements, thus expanding, gaining, restoring or maintaining access to markets.

Mandate and role

In fulfilling its role as a science-based regulatory agency, CFIA serves Canadians by developing policies and strategies, conducting specialized laboratory tests, and monitoring industry practice and compliance with legislation, in order to

CFIA works with a variety of departments across all 3 levels of government, collaborates with stakeholders, and remains receptive to the values of interests groups. Together, all parties play a unique role in managing food, plant and animal risks, incidents and emergencies as they occur, and the implementation of appropriate measures and interventions where necessary.

For more information on CFIA's organizational mandate letter commitments, see the Minister of Health's mandate letter.

Operating context

CFIA operates within a rapidly changing context as Canada is inextricably linked to a global economy and international influences. Risks to the food system and animal and plant resources have changed considerably in recent years and will continue to evolve rapidly. A growing population and diverse consumer preferences have led to an increasing volume and variety of products on the market. Global commerce has brought new business models and consolidation in the food and agricultural industry. Emerging and disruptive technology requires a regulatory system that promotes responsible adoption of such technology for public good without stifling innovation.

While these changes provide opportunities for Canadians, they bring operational challenges to CFIA. For instance, risks to food safety, animal and plant health have increased as a result of expanded international trade, accelerated technological innovation, and an increasingly complex and global supply chain of agricultural products. In addition, climate change is introducing potential risks, such as the possibility of pests and diseases becoming established in Canada where they would not have been able in the past.

Reporting framework

CFIA's approved departmental results framework and program inventory for 2022 to 2023 are as follows.

Departmental results framework and program inventory. Description follows.
Description for departmental results framework and program inventory

The first section of the image is the departmental results framework which shows the relationship between the service categories under core responsibility: safe food and healthy plants and animal and the activities and resources (Internal Services) related to each category.

The next section is a listing of the program inventory.

Departmental results framework

Service categories under core responsibility: safe food and healthy plants and animal are:

  • departmental result 1: food sold in Canada is safe and accurately represented to Canadians
  • departmental result 2: plant and animal resources are protected from diseases and pets and are safe for Canadians and the environment
  • departmental result 3: Canadian food, plants and animals and their associated products can be traded internationally

Internal Services related to the service categories are as follows:

Departmental result 1: food sold in Canada is safe and accurately represented to Canadians

Percentage of food establishments that have addressed compliance issues upon follow-up or were brought into compliance, by year

Percentage of higher risk food recalls that occurred prior to an adverse effect being reported to CFIA, by year

Percentage of Canadians who agree that CFIA helps ensure that food sold in Canada is safe, by year

Departmental result 2: plant and animal resources are protected from diseases and pets and are safe for Canadians and the environment

Number of harmful foreign plant pests that have entered and established themselves in Canada, by year

Percentage of regulated, harmful foreign plant pests that had previously entered and established in Canada and whose spread was successfully limited by CFIA control programs, by year

Percentage of plant inputs, products and by-products that comply with Canadian regulations and relevant international agreements, by year

Percentage of animal inputs, products and by-products that comply with Canadian regulations and relevant international agreements, by year

Percentage of Canadian producers that have maintained or improved their status in programs designed to protect the health of animals, by year

Rate of confirmed animal disease outbreaks per 100 investigations conducted by CFIA to limit the impact of animal health diseases within Canada, by year

Departmental result 3: Canadian food, plants and animals and their associated products can be traded internationally

Number of international markets that are opened or maintained based on CFIA activities, by year

Program inventory

  • Setting rules for food safety and consumer protection
  • Food safety and consumer protection compliance promotion
  • Monitoring and enforcement for food safety and consumer protection
  • Permissions for food products
  • Setting rules for plant health
  • Plant health compliance promotion
  • Monitoring and enforcement for plant health
  • Permissions for plant products
  • Setting rules for animal health
  • Animal health compliance promotion
  • Monitoring and enforcement for animal health
  • Permissions for animal products
  • International standard setting
  • International regulatory cooperation and science collaboration
  • International market access support

Supporting information on the program inventory

Supporting information on planned expenditures, human resources, and results related to CFIA's program inventory is available in the GC InfoBase.

Supplementary information tables

Departmental Sustainable Development Strategy

The Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) has been a voluntary participant in the Federal Sustainable Development Strategy (FSDS) since 2010. The FSDS is the Government of Canada's primary vehicle for sustainable development planning and reporting. It sets out sustainable development priorities, and establishes goals and targets. The 2019 to 2022 FSDS (PDF - 8,590 kb) presents the Government of Canada's sustainable development activities, as required by the Federal Sustainable Development Act (FSDA). In keeping with the objectives of the FSDA to make environmental decision making more transparent and accountable to Parliament, CFIA supports the implementation of the 2019 to 2022 FSDS through the activities under its 2020 to 2023 Departmental Sustainable Development Strategy (DSDS).

Details on transfer payment programs

Federal Assistance Program (FAP)

Start date 1997 to 1998
End date Ongoing
Type of transfer payment Contribution
Type of appropriation Voted appropriation – annually through estimates
Fiscal year for terms and conditions 2014 to 2015
Link to departmental result(s) Safe food and healthy plants and animals
Link to the department's program inventory The FAP is linked to all programs under CFIA's program inventory.
Purpose and objectives of transfer payment program The FAP supports projects and initiatives that advance CFIA's strategic outcome of a safe and accessible food supply and plant and animal resource base.
Expected results
  • The expected results include:
    • scientific and technical knowledge is advanced and/or enhanced
    • individual knowledge and skills are developed and/or improved
    • international collaborations are expanded and/or strengthened, and
    • organizations or initiatives are established or sustained
Fiscal year of last completed evaluation 2016 to 2017
Decision following the results of last evaluation Continuation
Fiscal year of next planned evaluation TBD
General targeted recipient groups Eligible recipients include those whose goals and objectives are complementary to and supportive of CFIA's mission and strategic outcome. This includes individuals, groups of individuals, agriculture and commodity organizations, and conservation districts.
Initiatives to engage applicants and recipients Program managers conduct informal outreach and consultation with potential recipients to seek new project proposals that may be considered for support with FAP contributions.

Financial information

Type of transfer payment 2021 to 2022 forecast spending 2022 to 2023 planned spending 2023 to 2024 planned spending 2024 to 2025 planned spending
Total grants Not applicable Not applicable Not applicable Not applicable
Total contributions 813,099 600,000 600,000 600,000
Total other types of transfer payments Not applicable Not applicable Not applicable Not applicable
Total program 813,099 600,000 600,000 600,000

Innovative Solutions Canada (ISC)

Start date 2018 to 2019
End date Ongoing
Type of transfer payment Grant
Type of appropriation Voted appropriation – annually through supplementary estimates
Fiscal year for terms and conditions 2018 to 2019
Link to departmental result(s) Safe food and healthy plants and animals
Link to the department's program inventory The ISC program is linked to all programs under CFIA's program inventory.
Purpose and objectives of transfer payment program The ISC program supports the generation of new and unique intellectual property (IP), stimulation of R and D collaborations, and growth of small businesses in the Canadian innovation ecosystem.
Expected results CFIA's Innovative Solutions Canada grants will promote the development of innovative approaches to stimulate growth in Canadian small businesses, while developing new capabilities to meet government needs.
Fiscal year of last completed evaluation Not applicable. The CFIA Evaluation Directorate has not yet conducted an evaluation of the CFIA ISC program.
Decision following the results of last evaluation Not applicable.
Fiscal year of next planned evaluation TBD
General targeted recipient groups Canadian small businesses (for profit organizations)
Initiatives to engage applicants and recipients Innovation, Science and Economic Development (ISED) Canada conducts engagement and consultation with applicants and recipients.

Financial information

Type of transfer payment 2021 to 2022 forecast spending 2022 to 2023 planned spending 2023 to 2024 planned spending 2024 to 2025 planned spending
Total grants 850,000 613,779 Not applicable Not applicable
Total contributions Not applicable Not applicable Not applicable Not applicable
Total other types of transfer payments Not applicable Not applicable Not applicable Not applicable
Total program 850,000 613,779 Not applicable Not applicable

Statutory Compensation Payments

3‑year plan for compensation payments in accordance with requirements established by regulations under the Health of Animals Act and the Plant Protection Act, and authorized pursuant to the Canadian Food Inspection Agency Act.

Statutory Compensation Payments
Start date 1997 to 1998
End date Ongoing
Type of transfer payment Compensation payments
Type of appropriation Statutory authority under the Health of Animals Act and the Plant Protection Act
Fiscal year for terms and conditions 1997 to 1998
Link to departmental result(s) Safe food and healthy plants and animals
Link to the department's program inventory
  • Monitoring and enforcement for plant health
  • Monitoring and enforcement for animal health
Purpose and objectives of transfer payment program Compensate Canadians, in accordance with the appropriate regulations, for plants or animals ordered destroyed for the purpose of disease control.
Expected results In accordance with the Health of Animals Act and the Plant Protection Act, owners and/or producers will be compensated for ordered destruction of animals or plants for the purpose of disease control. Compensation will be provided according to the market value of the animals or plants.
Fiscal year of last completed evaluation
  • 2019 to 2020
  • The evaluation of the Terrestrial Animal Health Program was completed in 2020. The evaluation included elements related to compensation.
Decision following the results of last evaluation Continuation
Fiscal year of next planned evaluation TBD
General targeted recipient groups Canadians who have had animals and/or plants ordered destroyed for the purpose of disease control.
Initiatives to engage applicants and recipients Information is provided to the eligible producers when animals and/or plants are ordered to be destroyed.

Financial Information

Type of transfer payment 2021 to 2022 forecast spending 2022 to 2023 planned spending 2020 to 2024 planned spending 2024 to 2025 planned spending
Total grants Not applicable Not applicable Not applicable Not applicable
Total contributions Not applicable Not applicable Not applicable Not applicable
Total other types of transfer payments 12,500,000 12,500,000 12,500,000 12,500,000
Total program 12,500,000 12,500,000 12,500,000 12,500,000

Gender-based analysis plus

Introduction

Each organization is responsible to conduct its own analysis, under the Gender-Based Analysis Plus (GBA Plus) framework, to support this government-wide reporting requirement.

In 2018, Parliament passed the Canadian Gender Budgeting Act. The Departmental Plans and Departmental Results Reports are being used to fulfil the President of the Treasury Board's obligations to make public analysis on the impacts of expenditure programs on gender and diversity.

General information

Institutional GBA Plus capacity
The Vice-President, Policy and Programs Branch is the Chief Diversity Officer and GBA Plus Champion for CFIA, and is responsible for promoting awareness of GBA Plus with senior management and governance. GBA Plus analysis is conducted by program officers as part of their ongoing activities based on best available information, and 1 full time equivalent is assigned to provide overall support in integrating GBA Plus considerations across business lines.

Highlights of GBA Plus results reporting capacity by program

All programs
  • For all programs, CFIA uses available census data from Statistics Canada for the agriculture and agri-food sector as well as socio-economic analysis by the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD), relevant policy think tanks, and Agriculture and Agri-food Canada. In addition, it consults scientific literature published by international competent regulatory authorities and relevant international standard-setting organizations including the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO), International Plant Protection Convention (IPPC), Codex Alimentarius Commission for food safety standards and the World Organization for Animal Health (WOAH) for animal health standards. This is in-line with a One Health approach to all health-related issues including zoonotic diseases, antimicrobial resistance, food safety and food security, vector-borne diseases, environmental contamination, and other health threats shared by people, animals, and the environment.
  • Ongoing digitization of CFIA services through tools such as the agency's Digital Service Delivery Platform (DSDP) and its public-facing counterpart, MyCFIA, will also provide a key opportunity to acquire further data. In addition to enabling businesses to trade their products more rapidly, and supporting market diversification and long-term economic growth in the food, plant and animal sectors, these tools will also equip CFIA with quicker, more reliable data and reporting tools. For GBA Plus, they will capture at regular intervals GBA Plus-related metrics for some indicators, primarily those related to income, geographic location and type of activities engaged in by regulated parties.

Horizontal initiatives

CFIA has no planned horizontal initiatives for 2022 to 2023.

Up-front multi-year funding

CFIA has no multi-year funding.

United Nations 2030 Agenda and the Sustainable Development Goals

Introduction

In 2015, all United Nations (UN) member states came together and adopted Transforming Our World: The 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development. At its heart are 17 Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) that encompass the social, economic, and environmental challenges of today.

Many Government of Canada priorities align with the United Nations 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development and the SDGs, including gender equality, diversity and inclusiveness, environmental sustainability, and economic prosperity.

All federal ministers, departments and agencies are accountable for implementing the 2030 Agenda and its SDGs within their areas of responsibility. This shared collaboration across the Government of Canada will help to ensure that Canada's commitment to the 2030 Agenda remains focused on effective implementation from now until 2030. Officials across federal departments and agencies are responsible for integrating the SDGs into their work, engaging with stakeholders and reporting on progress made on the SDGs within their purview.

To support a whole-of-Canada approach, the Government of Canada has established an SDG Unit to coordinate efforts, raise awareness, monitor and report on Canada's implementation of the 2030 Agenda.

CFIA's contributions

CFIA's planned activities under its core responsibility "Safe food and healthy plants and animals" support Canada's efforts to address the SDGs.

To support the Zero Hunger Goal (SDG 2), CFIA, in cooperation with provincial and territorial governments and industry associations, sets policies and verifies regulatory compliance aiming to: prevent food safety incidents; reduce the risks associated with diseases and toxic substances that may affect animals or that may be transmitted by animals to people; and protect plant resources from threats such as diseases, pests and invasive species.

Through the surveillance and control of terrestrial and aquatic animal diseases, CFIA protects public health and supports the Good Health and Well-Being Goal (SDG 3) as some of these diseases may be transmitted to humans (zoonotic).

By establishing and enforcing fertilizer and supplement registrations and safety standards, CFIA supports the Good Health and Well-being Goal (SDG 3) and, Clean Water and Sanitation Goal (SDG 6).

By promoting compliance and carrying out enforcement activities, CFIA is minimizing the spread and introduction of invasive species that affect Canada's plant and environmental resources, contributing to the Life on Land Goal (SDG 15).

Through outreach and awareness activities and campaigns, CFIA reinforces the shared responsibility of managing invasive species in nature and supports the Responsible Consumption and Production Goal (SDG 12).

Federal tax expenditures

CFIA's Departmental Plan does not include information on tax expenditures that relate to its planned results for 2022 to 2023.

Tax expenditures are the responsibility of the Minister of Finance, and the Department of Finance Canada publishes cost estimates and projections for government‑wide tax expenditures each year in the Report on Federal Tax Expenditures. This report provides detailed information on tax expenditures, including objectives, historical background and references to related federal spending programs, as well as evaluations, research papers and gender-based analysis. The tax measures presented in this report are solely the responsibility of the Minister of Finance.

Organizational contact information

Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA)
1400 Merivale Road
Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0Y9
Canada
Telephone: 1-800-442-2342 / 1-613-773-2342
Teletypewriter: 1-800-465-7735
Internet: Contact CFIA online

Appendix: definitions

Appropriation (crédit)
Any authority of Parliament to pay money out of the Consolidated Revenue Fund.
Budgetary expenditures (dépenses budgétaires)
Operating and capital expenditures; transfer payments to other levels of government, organizations or individuals; and payments to Crown corporations.
Core responsibility (responsabilité essentielle)
An enduring function or role performed by a department. The intentions of the department with respect to a core responsibility are reflected in 1 or more related departmental results that the department seeks to contribute to or influence.
Departmental Plan (plan ministériel)
A report on the plans and expected performance of a department over a 3‑year period. Departmental Plans are tabled in Parliament each spring.
Departmental priority (priorité ministérielle)
A plan or project that a department has chosen to focus and report on during the planning period. Departmental priorities represent the things that are most important or what must be done first to support the achievement of the desired departmental results.
Departmental result (résultat ministériel)
A consequence or outcome that a department seeks to achieve. A departmental result is often outside departments' immediate control, but it should be influenced by program-level outcomes.
Departmental result indicator (indicateur de résultat ministériel)
A factor or variable that provides a valid and reliable means to measure or describe progress on a departmental result.
Departmental results framework (cadre ministériel des résultats)
A framework that consists of the department's core responsibilities, departmental results and departmental result indicators.
Departmental Results Report (rapport sur les résultats ministériels)
A report on a department's actual accomplishments against the plans, priorities and expected results set out in the corresponding Departmental Plan.
Experimentation (expérimentation)
The conducting of activities that seek to first explore, then test and compare, the effects and impacts of policies and interventions in order to inform evidence-based decision-making, and improve outcomes for Canadians, by learning what works and what does not. Experimentation is related to, but distinct form innovation (the trying of new things), because it involves a rigorous comparison of results. For example, using a new website to communicate with Canadians can be an innovation; systematically testing the new website against existing outreach tools or an old website to see which one leads to more engagement, is experimentation.
Full‑time equivalent (équivalent temps plein)
A measure of the extent to which an employee represents a full person‑year charge against a departmental budget. Full‑time equivalents are calculated as a ratio of assigned hours of work to scheduled hours of work. Scheduled hours of work are set out in collective agreements.
Gender-based analysis plus (GBA Plus) (analyse comparative entre les sexes plus [ACS Plus])
An analytical process used to assess how diverse groups of women, men and gender-diverse people experience policies, programs and services based on multiple factors including race, ethnicity, religion, age, and mental or physical disability.
Government-wide priorities (priorités pangouvernementales)
For the purpose of the 2021–22 Departmental Plan, government-wide priorities refers to those high-level themes outlining the government's agenda in the 2020 Speech from the Throne, namely: Protecting Canadians from COVID-19; Helping Canadians through the pandemic; Building back better – a resiliency agenda for the middle class; The Canada we're fighting for.
Horizontal initiative (initiative horizontale)
An initiative in which 2 or more federal organizations are given funding to pursue a shared outcome, often linked to a government priority.
Non‑budgetary expenditures (dépenses non budgétaires)
Net outlays and receipts related to loans, investments and advances, which change the composition of the financial assets of the Government of Canada.
Performance (rendement)
What an organization did with its resources to achieve its results, how well those results compare to what the organization intended to achieve, and how well lessons learned have been identified.
Performance indicator (indicateur de rendement)
A qualitative or quantitative means of measuring an output or outcome, with the intention of gauging the performance of an organization, program, policy or initiative respecting expected results.
Performance reporting (production de rapports sur le rendement)
The process of communicating evidence‑based performance information. Performance reporting supports decision-making, accountability and transparency.
Plan (plan)
The articulation of strategic choices, which provides information on how an organization intends to achieve its priorities and associated results. Generally a plan will explain the logic behind the strategies chosen and tend to focus on actions that lead up to the expected result.
Planned spending (dépenses prévues)
For Departmental Plans and Departmental Results Reports, planned spending refers to those amounts presented in the Main Estimates.
A department is expected to be aware of the authorities that it has sought and received. The determination of planned spending is a departmental responsibility, and departments must be able to defend the expenditure and accrual numbers presented in their Departmental Plans and Departmental Results Reports.
Program (programme)
Individual or groups of services, activities or combinations thereof that are managed together within the department and focus on a specific set of outputs, outcomes or service levels.
Program inventory (répertoire des programmes)
Identifies all of the department's programs and describes how resources are organized to contribute to the department's core responsibilities and results.
Result (résultat)
An external consequence attributed, in part, to an organization, policy, program or initiative. Results are not within the control of a single organization, policy, program or initiative; instead they are within the area of the organization's influence.
Statutory expenditures (dépenses législatives)
Expenditures that Parliament has approved through legislation other than appropriation acts. The legislation sets out the purpose of the expenditures and the terms and conditions under which they may be made.
Strategic outcome (résultat stratégique)
A long-term and enduring benefit to Canadians that is linked to the organization's mandate, vision and core functions.
Target (cible)
A measurable performance or success level that an organization, program or initiative plans to achieve within a specified time period. Targets can be either quantitative or qualitative.
Voted expenditures (dépenses votées)
Expenditures that Parliament approves annually through an Appropriation Act . The vote wording becomes the governing conditions under which these expenditures may be made.
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