Language selection

Search

Detection of high pathogenic avian influenza (H5N1) in Newfoundland and Labrador 2021

Update on current investigation

January 11, 2022

On January 9, 2022, the Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) confirmed the presence of high pathogenic Avian Influenza (AI), subtype H5N1, at an additional farm in the Avalon Peninsula on the island portion of Newfoundland and Labrador. This small flock farm does not produce birds for sale.

Canada's status as 'free from AI' remains in place in accordance with the World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE) guidance.

While this additional detection should have no impact on trade, this situation serves as a strong reminder that AI is spreading across the globe in wild birds as they migrate to and from Canada, and that anyone with farm animals, including birds, should practice good biosecurity habits to protect them from animal diseases.

Statement

December 22, 2021

On December 20, the CFIA confirmed the presence of high pathogenic AI, subtype H5N1, at a multi-species exhibition farm in the Avalon Peninsula on the island portion of Newfoundland and Labrador. This exhibition farm does not produce birds for sale.

As the infected birds were located on an exhibition farm, and no other cases resembling Avian Influenza have been reported in the vicinity of the farm, Canada's status as 'free from AI' remains in place in accordance with the OIE guidance.

Avian Influenza circulates naturally in avian fauna and recent detections of high pathogenic AI in Europe indicate an even higher risk of the disease in North American poultry flocks this year. This makes it more important than ever for anyone raising poultry to remain vigilant against AI and ensure they have effective biosecurity measures in place. Biosecurity is a key tool for preventing the transmission of this disease to North American farm birds.

While this detection should have no impact on trade, it does serve as a strong reminder that Avian Influenza is spreading across the globe, and that anyone with farm animals must practice good biosecurity habits. Meanwhile, officials from the Province of Newfoundland and Labrador, the CFIA, and the owner of the infected birds are working closely together to manage this particular situation.

Resources are available for producers and owners of backyard flocks and pet birds:

Quick Facts

Date modified: