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Departmental Sustainable Development Strategy 2023 to 2027

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Executive summary

The Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) has been a participant in the Federal Sustainable Development Strategy (FSDS) since 2010. The FSDS is the Government of Canada's primary vehicle for sustainable development planning and reporting. It sets out sustainable development priorities, and establishes goals and targets.

The 2022 to 2026 FSDS presents the Government of Canada's sustainable development activities, as required by the Federal Sustainable Development Act (the act). In keeping with the objectives of the act (in other words to make environmental decision making more transparent and accountable to Parliament), the CFIA supports the implementation of the 2022 to 2026 FSDS through the activities described in this 2023 to 2027 Departmental Sustainable Development Strategy (DSDS).

Of the 17 established FSDS goals, the CFIA's contributions are primarily directed toward the following 5:

The CFIA's contribution to sustainable development also extends to the sustainable development goal (SDG) 3, good health and well-being goal and to SDG 6, clean water and sanitation goal of the United Nations' Agenda 2030.

The CFIA is specifically working toward the following targets:

Progress toward these targets and implementation strategies identified herein will be reported through annual DSDS reports.

Section 1: Introduction to the Departmental Sustainable Development Strategy

The 2022 to 2026 Federal Sustainable Development Strategy (FSDS) presents the Government of Canada's sustainable development goals and targets, as required by the Federal Sustainable Development Act. This is the first FSDS to be framed using the 17 Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) of the United Nations 2030 Agenda and provides a balanced view of the environmental, social and economic dimensions of sustainable development.

In keeping with the purpose of the act, to make decision-making related to sustainable development more transparent and accountable to Parliament, the CFIA supports the goals laid out in the FSDS through the activities described in this DSDS.

The Federal Sustainable Development Act also sets out 7 principles that must be considered in the development of the FSDS as well as DSDSs. These basic principles have been considered and incorporated into the CFIA's DSDS.

In order to promote coordinated action on sustainable development across the Government of Canada, this departmental strategy integrates efforts to advance Canada's implementation of the 2030 Agenda National Strategy, supported by the Global Indicator Framework (GIF) and Canadian Indicator Framework (CIF) targets and indicators. The strategy also now captures SDG initiatives that fall outside the scope of the FSDS to inform the development of the Canada's Annual Report on the 2030 Agenda and the SDGs.

Section 2: Canadian Food Inspection Agency's sustainable development vision

The agency's sustainable development vision is "to be a trusted, science-based regulator that safeguards food, animals and plants through a One Health approach; supports Canada's economic, social and environmental health; and improves the quality of life for future generations". As part of its mandate, the CFIA, in collaboration and partnership with all Canadians through a citizen and community science approach, as well as with industry, with federal, provincial, territorial and municipal governments, is dedicated to safeguarding food, animals and plants, which enhances the health and well-being of Canada's people, environment and economy.

As risks to the health of animals, humans, plants and their ecosystems are often interconnected, the CFIA strives to utilize a One Health approach in the management of those risks. The current and future economic prosperity of the Canadian agriculture and forestry sectors relies on a healthy and sustainable animal and plant resource base. As such, the CFIA is continually improving its program design and delivery in the animal health and plant resource areas in order to minimize and manage risks, and in consideration of social, economic and environmental sustainable development.

Goal 15

Canada's natural spaces, including agricultural lands, provide habitats that wildlife populations need to thrive. They also provide ecosystem services that are essential for our well-being, such as providing food, controlling floods, supporting pollination, filtering our air and water, and storing carbon dioxide, an important greenhouse gas (GHG). Maintaining biodiversity, the variety of genes, species and ecosystems, including the ecological processes that allow them to evolve and adapt, helps ensure that ecosystems can continue to function and provide the services we depend on. Healthy wildlife populations and habitats are important parts of biodiversity. Some species in Canada have experienced population declines as a result of habitat loss or deterioration from human activities, (for example, in riparian areas).

The CFIA aims to mitigate risks to Canada's plant resource base, which is integral to a safe and accessible food supply, as well as to public health and environmental sustainability. This goal is achieved by:

Through the Plant Breeders' Rights intellectual property protection, the CFIA aims to enhance the climate resilience of our agricultural and horticultural plant varieties by encouraging increased investment in plant breeding in Canada, while fostering greater accessibility to foreign seed varieties for farmers. Achieving these objectives instills confidence in Canada's plants, plant production systems and plant products, and contributes to the health of Canada's plant resources.

In collaboration with domestic and international partners and in support of sustainable food systems, the CFIA has adopted a One Health approach that focuses on the connections between the health of humans, animals, plants and their ecosystems to address serious and growing health threats, such as antimicrobial resistance. It is through this approach, that the CFIA guards against deliberate threats to the plant and resource base (for example, by establishing biocontainment levels for pests and diseases that are new or emerging; and regulating the biocontainment and biosecurity requirements that are needed to protect the Canadian public, and the environment).

Goal 3

The CFIA aims to mitigate risks to Canada's animal resource base, animal feeds and animal products, which are integral to a safe and accessible food supply system in addition to public health. This goal is achieved by

To mitigate risks associated with animal diseases that can be transmitted to humans the CFIA controls diseases within animal populations, and advocates the prudent use of antimicrobials in livestock production, with the objective of mitigating antimicrobial resistance. The agency also addresses climate change impacts through numerous actions, for example, by studying vector-borne diseases through surveillance programs, conducting diagnostic test method development, and collaborating with scientists working in federal, provincial, and international laboratories. Through these actions, the CFIA supports the health of Canada's animal resources and instills confidence in the safety of Canada's animals, animal products and by-products, and production systems.

Goal 2

Canada's food systems, including agriculture, aquaculture, fisheries and food and beverage processing, provide safe and healthy food for Canadians, help ensure long-term food security, and are an important part of our economy. Protecting our environment, including freshwater and soil quality, will help ensure our food systems continue to feed Canadians with safe products and create jobs over the long term. To support safe and secure food, the CFIA, in cooperation with other federal departments, provincial governments and industry associations, sets policies and verifies regulatory compliance to prevent food contamination and hazards. The CFIA also supports addressing regional food insecurity issues through the co-development of options for the processing, sale and trade of traditional and country foods.

The CFIA contributes to promoting sustainable food production systems domestically by providing a regulatory framework for the certification of organic food products, registering climate-resilient seeds and crops, supporting our farmers' market to safe and innovative agricultural inputs such as fertilizers and supplements. The agency also support sustainable development in developing countries, for example through technical support, under SDG 2, 3 and 15 as recorded under the Total Official Support for Sustainable Development (TOSSD).

Goal 13

The CFIA's contribution to protecting the water-related ecosystems is achieved through accurate labelling of fertilizer and supplement products. This enables their safe and sustainable use, as well as new product registrations that facilitate grower access to innovative inputs. The CFIA also administers safety standards for contaminants including organic waste recycled as fertilizers or soil conditioners. Those activities also support the GHG effort in the fight against climate change, along with other measures, such as improving the energy efficiency of our buildings and fleet and the adoption of green procurement practices.

The CFIA's fight against climate change also includes adaptation efforts in support of the National Adaptation Strategy. These include assessing climate-change risks to agency assets, services and operations on a regular basis; identifying and prioritizing the actions (under a CFIA Climate Change Adaptation Action Plan) the agency will adopt to enhance its resilience; incorporating climate change considerations into agency business continuity planning, departmental risk planning and program design considerations; and measuring progress made.

Goal 10

Food insecurity and food safety issues, the degradation of ecosystem services, and the spread of infectious diseases do not impact Canadians evenly due to different exposures and social determinants of health and health inequalities. Indigenous Peoples are more severely affected by social, environmental and economic impacts. To mitigate those inequalities, the CFIA, along with other federal departments and agencies, is required to implement the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples Act (UNDA), and is using the Gender-Based Analysis Plus (GBA Plus) analytical process to support the development of responsive and inclusive initiatives, including regulations, programs and services.

More information on CFIA work toward contributing to sustainable development can be found in the departmental reports.

Section 3: Listening to Canadians

As required by the Federal Sustainable Development Act, the CFIA has taken into account comments on the draft 2022 to 2026 FSDS made during the public consultation held from March 11 to July 9, 2022. During the public consultation, more than 700 comments were received from a broad range of stakeholders, including governments, Indigenous organizations, non-governmental organizations, academics, businesses, and individual Canadians in different age groups and of various backgrounds. The draft FSDS was also shared with the appropriate committee of each House of Parliament, the Commissioner of the Environment and Sustainable Development, and the Sustainable Development Advisory Council for their review and comment.

What we heard

Across the submissions received, the CFIA identified sustainable development priorities and issues that affect the agency's operations.

Under Goal 15 (Land: protect and recover species, conserve Canadian biodiversity), to which the CFIA is a contributing department, a key comment urged "more involvement from younger generations." As Canada's national plant protection organization, the CFIA monitors imports and the domestic movement of plants, plant products and other things to prevent entry and spread of plant pests; and conducts surveillance to determine the presence of plant pests or confirm that an area is free of a specific plant pest. These activities are critical for protecting Canada's biodiversity. The CFIA has a history of working with youth on plant protection and biodiversity through schools and community groups.

The FSDS consultation report also identified the need for the integration of Indigenous knowledge into targets, milestones, and implementation strategies. With a mandate to safeguard the food supply, plant and animal health, the CFIA recognizes the relationship between its mandate and the importance of these resources to Indigenous Peoples' spirituality, traditions and ways of life.

What we did

The CFIA took the above-mentioned key priorities and issues into consideration in preparing this DSDS. For example, the CFIA added a new youth engagement performance indicator and target within Goal 15 (Protect and recover species, conserve Canadian biodiversity). Specifically, the indicator supports the "Prevent, detect, respond to, control and manage invasive alien species" implementation strategy.

With respect to Goal 10 (Advance Reconciliation with Indigenous Peoples and take action on inequality), the CFIA has included a performance target that highlights its actions toward advancing Reconciliation, which includes commitments related to the implementation of the UNDA which itself include the integration of Indigenous knowledge through the establishment of an Indigenous science office.

Find more information on the FSDS public consultation and its results in the FSDS consultation report.

Section 4: Canadian Food Inspection Agency's commitments

Goal 2

Goal 2: Support a healthier and more sustainable food system

FSDS context

The CFIA designs and delivers programs that verify the safety and accurate representation of food consumed by Canadians. The agency enforces sound, science-based rules that support the production and import of foods that consistently meet Canadian high-quality standards. Its food safety programs aim to prevent hazards in the food supply system and manage any food safety emergencies and incidents by working with industry and federal, provincial, territorial and international food safety partners.

Target theme: Sustainable food systems

Implementation strategies supporting the goal: Ensure the safety of Canada's food system

This section is for implementation strategies that support the goal "Support a healthier and more sustainable food system" but not a specific FSDS target.

Departmental action Performance indicator
starting point
target
How the departmental action contributes to the FSDS goal and target and, where applicable, to Canada's 2030 Agenda National Strategy And SDGS
  • Continue to proactively safeguard Canada's food system and provide safe and healthy food for Canadians by:
    • Conducting proactive assessment and management of risk supporting the agency's risk-based oversight
    • Conducting surveillance and monitoring activities to verify food product content compliance with the regulatory requirements
    • Taking enforcement and corrective actions when non-compliance is found
  • Program: Setting rules for food safety and consumer protection
  • Performance indicator: Percentage (%) of tested imported and domestic food products in compliance with federal regulations
  • Starting point: 94% in 2022 to 2023
  • Target: At least 95% annually
  • Canada's integrated and outcome-based food safety system sets out the requirements for the food industry, encompassing food safety and consumer protection requirements, and enables it to contribute to Canada's sustainable and reliable food supply in demonstrable ways
  • Monitoring and reporting on the compliance of food product content with federal food safety and consumer protection requirements provides insight on the success of Canada's food safety system in producing safe and accurately represented food for Canadians
  • CFIA verification activities, including surveillance and monitoring of compliance with federal food safety and consumer protection requirements, encourage compliance with regulatory requirements. Higher compliance assures Canadians of a safe, consistent, and reliable food supply
  • Relevant targets or ambitions:
    GIF target 2.1: By 2030, end hunger and ensure access by all people, in particular the poor and people in vulnerable situations, including infants, to safe, nutritious and sufficient food all year round

Initiatives advancing Canada's implementation of SDG 2 – Zero hunger

The following initiatives demonstrate how the CFIA's programming supports the 2030 Agenda and the SDGs, supplementing the information outlined above.

Planned initiatives Associated domestics targets or ambitions and/or global targets
Protecting food production from plant diseases, pests, and invasive species GIF target 2.1: By 2030, end hunger and ensure access by all people, in particular the poor and people in vulnerable situations, including infants, to safe, nutritious and sufficient food all year round
Supporting food security through the control of terrestrial and aquatic animal diseases
In collaboration with domestic and international partners and in support of sustainable food systems, adopting a One Health approach that focuses on the connections between the health of humans, animals, plants and their ecosystems to address the serious and growing public health threat such as antimicrobial resistance GIF target 2.4: By 2030, ensure sustainable food production systems and implement resilient agricultural practices that increase productivity and production, that help maintain ecosystems, that strengthen capacity for adaptation to climate change, extreme weather, drought, flooding and other disasters and that progressively improve land and soil quality
Supporting sustainable food production systems, increased agricultural yields, crop productivity, and innovation in the agricultural sector by ensuring that innovative agricultural inputs such as fertilizers and supplements used by the farmer do not contain toxic or harmful substances such as pathogens, trace metals and other persistent organic pollutants
Providing a regulatory framework that enables the registration of climate resilient seeds and crops
Authorizing research field trials and the unconfined environmental (commercial) release of plants with characteristics that are new to Canada, and whose traits may increase sustainable agricultural production practices
Contributing to promoting sustainable development in developing countries as recorded using the Total Official Support for Sustainable Development (TOSSD) international standard GIF target 2.a: Increase investment, including through enhanced international cooperation, in rural infrastructure, agricultural research and extension services, technology development and plant and livestock gene banks in order to enhance agricultural productive capacity in developing countries, in particular least developed countries
Goal 3

Goal 3: Support mental health and adopt healthy behaviours

Initiatives advancing Canada's implementation of SDG 3 – Good health and well-being

The following initiatives demonstrate how the CFIA's programming supports the 2030 Agenda and the SDGs, supplementing the information outlined above.

Planned initiatives Associated domestics targets or ambitions and/or global targets
Protecting the health of Canadians and animals through the surveillance, prevention, and control of terrestrial and aquatic animal diseases, and facilitating access for producers and veterinarians to a wider range of safe, effective and quality new veterinary biologics and feed related products in Canada
  • GIF target 3.3: By 2030, end the epidemics of AIDS, tuberculosis, malaria and neglected tropical diseases and combat hepatitis, water-borne diseases and other communicable diseases
  • GIF target 3.d: Strengthen the capacity of all countries, in particular developing countries, for early warning, risk reduction and management of national and global health risks
In collaboration with domestic and international partners and in support of sustainable food systems, adopting a One Health approach that focuses on the connections between the health of humans, animals, plants and their ecosystems to address the serious and growing public health threat such as, antimicrobial resistance
Contributing to promoting sustainable development in developing countries as recorded using the Total Official Support for Sustainable Development (TOSSD) international standard GIF target 3.d: Strengthen the capacity of all countries, in particular developing countries, for early warning, risk reduction and management of national and global health risks
Goal 6

Goal 6: Ensure clean and safe water for all Canadians

Initiatives advancing Canada's implementation of SDG 6 – Clean water and sanitation

The following initiatives demonstrate how the CFIA programming supports the 2030 Agenda and the SDGs, supplementing the information outlined above.

Planned initiatives Associated domestics targets or ambitions and/or global targets
Protecting the health of plants, animals, humans and the environment including water-related ecosystems through fertilizer and supplement product registrations and pre-market assessments. Mandatory labelling of fertilizers enables safe and sustainable product use and minimizes over-application which leads to nutrient pollution and run-off. GIF target 6.6: By 2020, protect and restore water-related ecosystems, including mountains, forests, wetlands, rivers, aquifers and lakes
Goal 10

Goal 10: Advance reconciliation with Indigenous Peoples and take action on inequality

FSDS context

The CFIA recognizes the relationship between its mandate to safeguard the food supply and plant and animal health and the importance of these resources to Indigenous Peoples' spirituality, traditions and ways of life. This includes their right to use and conserve traditional resources, now and for future generations.

The CFIA actively supports the implementation of the UNDA along with other federal departments and agencies by:

Incorporating Indigenous perspectives into the delivery of the agency's mandate requires investment into foundational employee training and supporting capacity to build meaningful relationships with Indigenous Peoples. The CFIA is taking steps to advance Reconciliation through activities such as:

This builds on the ongoing implementation of the Gender Based Analysis Plus (GBA Plus) and Assessment of Modern Treaty Impacts lenses which recognizes the importance of integrating intersectional factors into decision making.

Target theme: Advancing reconciliation with First Nations, Inuit, and the Métis communities

Target: Between 2023 and 2026, and every year on an ongoing basis, develop and table annual progress reports on implementing the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples Act (Minister of Justice and Attorney General of Canada)

Implementation strategy: Implement the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples (UNDRIP) Act

Departmental action Performance indicator
starting point
target
How the departmental action contributes to the FSDS goal and target and, where applicable, to Canada's 2030 Agenda National Strategy and SDGs
  • Create an Indigenous science office to develop and apply a Two-Eyed Seeing Framework. Two-eyed Seeing refers to learning to see from one eye with the strengths of Indigenous Knowledge and ways of knowing, and from the other eye with the strengths of Western knowledge and ways of knowing, taking advantage of multiple perspectives
  • Programs:
    Setting rules for plant health
  • Setting rules for food safety and consumer protection
  • Setting rules for animal health
  • Performance indicator: Percentage (%) of activities for which the Two-Eyed Seeing Framework has been applied
  • Starting point: Research of the Two-Eyed Seeing Framework and a government scan on its usage to be established March 2024
  • Target: 100% by 2027
  • Relevant targets or ambitions:
    GIF target 10.3: Ensure equal opportunity and reduce inequalities of outcome, including by eliminating discriminatory laws, policies and practices and promoting appropriate legislation policies and action in this regard
  • One goal under the UNDA Action Plan is to ensure a Canada where: Indigenous Peoples are supported by initiatives that promote connection, development, access and improvement, as well as full participation in all aspects of Canada's economy, and; Indigenous Peoples are healthy, adequately housed and safe
  • In support of this goal, the Government of Canada committed to awarding at least 5% of the total value of contracts the federal government awards each year to Indigenous businesses
  • The CFIA will increase opportunities for Indigenous Peoples through its procurement process by leveraging provisions available in the federal Procurement Strategy for Indigenous Business (PSIB) policy
  • Program: Internal Services
  • Performance indicator: Percentage (%) of total value of contracts awarded each year to Indigenous businesses
  • Starting point: 5.8% in 2022 to 2023
  • Target: At least 5% each year
Goal 12

Goal 12: Reduce waste and transition to zero-emission vehicles

FSDS context

The CFIA is committed to enhancing its environmental management practices by maximizing diversion of its waste from landfill, transforming its light-duty fleet by prioritizing the purchase of zero-emission vehicles, increasing its usage of clean electricity sources, and strengthening its green procurement criteria. The CFIA's asset base, which includes laboratories, quarantine and inspection stations, scientific equipment, a fleet, and information management and information technology assets, is critically important in supporting effective program delivery and ultimately to deliver the agency's mandate.

Target theme: Federal leadership on responsible consumption

Target: By 2030, the Government of Canada will divert from landfill at least 75% by weight of non-hazardous operational waste (all Ministers)

Implementation strategy: Maximize diversion of waste from landfill

Departmental action Performance indicator
starting point
target
How the departmental action contributes to the FSDS goal and target and, where applicable, to Canada's 2030 Agenda National Strategy and SDGs
  • Develop and implement strategies to increase waste diversion rate in laboratory operations
  • Track and disclose waste diversion rates of non-hazardous operational waste and plastic waste from landfills through the following activities:
    • Complete waste audits for a representative sample of most major facilities, to enable quantification and characterization of operational waste
    • Implement waste reduction and diversion measures that are identified in the waste audits
  • Program: Internal Services
  • For CFIA-owned facilities >10,000 m2 with an occupancy of >100 full-time employees (FTEs):
  • Performance indicator: Percentage (%) by weight of non-hazardous operational waste diverted (plastic not included)
  • Starting point: 73% in 2021 to 2022
  • Target: 75% by 2030
  • By prioritizing the diversion and reduction of waste in CFIA-owned buildings and operations, CFIA will help to reduce Scope 3 emissions from the production, transport and disposal of material. Diverting waste from landfill reduces landfill gas and transport hauling emissions. Material recovery via recycling reduces emissions for the extraction and production of virgin materials
  • Relevant targets or ambitions:
    GIF target 12.5: By 2030, substantially reduce waste generation through prevention, reduction, recycling and reuse
  • For CFIA-owned facilities >10,000 m2 with an occupancy of >100 FTEs
  • Performance indicator: Percentage (%) by weight of non-hazardous plastic operational waste diverted
  • Starting point: 42% in 2021 to 2022
  • Target: 75% by 2030

Target: by 2030, the Government of Canada will divert from landfill at least 90% by weight of all construction and demolition waste (all Ministers)

Implementation strategy: Maximize diversion of waste from landfill

Departmental action Performance indicator
starting point
target
How the departmental action contributes to the FSDS goal and target and, where applicable, to Canada's 2030 Agenda National Strategy and SDGs
  • Track and disclose construction and demolition waste for projects where construction is estimated over $1 million
  • Complete planning and tracking for applicable projects to enable quantification of construction and demolition waste
  • Program: Internal Services
  • Performance indicator: Percentage (%) by weight of construction and demolition waste diverted from landfills annually
  • Starting point: To be established in 2024 to 2025
  • Target: At least 90% by weight of all annual construction and demolition waste will be diverted from landfill by 2030
  • By tracking construction and demolition waste diversion rates, the CFIA will be able to plan more effectively to help reduce Scope 3 emissions from the production, transport and disposal of material. Diverting waste from landfill reduces landfill gas and transport waste hauling emissions. Material recovery via recycling reduces emissions for the extraction and production of virgin materials
  • Relevant targets or ambitions:
    GIF target 12.5: By 2030, substantially reduce waste generation through prevention, reduction, recycling and reuse

Target: The Government of Canada's procurement of goods and services will be net-zero emissions by 2050, to aid the transition to a net-zero, circular economy (all Ministers)

Implementation strategy: Transform the federal light-duty fleet

Departmental action Performance indicator
starting point
target
How the departmental action contributes to the FSDS goal and target and, where applicable, to Canada's 2030 Agenda National Strategy and SDGs
  • Prioritize zero-emission vehicles (ZEV) in fleet vehicle purchases. Hybrid procurement will be considered if ZEV are not an option
  • All new executive vehicle purchases will be ZEV or hybrids
  • Program: Internal Services
  • Performance indicator: Percentage (%) of annual fleet purchases that are ZEV or hybrid
  • Starting point: 22% in 2019 to 2020
  • Target: At least 75% of annual purchases of new light-duty, on-road fleet vehicles for the conventional fleet will be zero-emission vehicles or hybrids by 2025
As conventional vehicles are replaced over their lifetimes with ZEV, and/or the size of the fleet is reduced, a greater proportion of the fleet will be ZEV
  • Performance indicator: Percentage (%) of ZEV or hybrid in fleet
  • Starting point: 1% in 2019 to 2020
  • Target: At least 15% of operating fleet is ZEV or hybrid by 2025

Implementation strategy: Strengthen green procurement criteria

Departmental action Performance indicator
starting point
target
How the departmental action contributes to the FSDS goal and target and, where applicable, to Canada's 2030 Agenda National Strategy and SDGs
  • Include environmental considerations in procurement instruments
  • Fulfill the requirements of the Policy on Green Procurement related to training, employee performance evaluations, procurement management processes and controls and using common use procurement instruments.
  • Program: Internal Services
  • Performance indicator: Percentage (%) of contracts that include criteria and/or technical specifications address environmental considerations
  • Starting point: To be established in 2023 to 2024
  • Target: 50% annually
  • Strengthen environmental considerations in procurement instruments
  • Green procurement incorporates environmental considerations into purchasing decisions and is expected to motivate suppliers to reduce the environmental impact of the goods and services they deliver, and their supply chains
  • Relevant targets or ambitions:
    GIF target 12.7: Promote public procurement practices that are sustainable, in accordance with national policies and priorities
  • Performance indicator: Percentage (%) of Public Services and Procurement Canada (PSPC) and Shared Services Canada (SSC) standing offers and supply arrangements utilized for the purchase of CFIA goods and services that include criteria that address environmental considerations such as greenhouse gas emission reduction, plastic waste reduction and/or broader environmental benefits
  • Starting point: To be established in 2023 to 2024
  • Target: 60% of all CFIA purchases each year against PSPC or SSC standing offers or supply arrangements
  • Performance indicator: Percentage (%) of procurement specialists that completed the Canada School of Public Service (CSPS) Procurement course
  • Starting point: 100% in 2022 to 2023
  • Target: 100% annually
  • Performance indicator: Percentage (%) of identified managers and functional heads of procurement that have performance agreements that clearly include support and contribution toward green procurement
  • Starting point: 100% in 2022 to 2023
  • Target: 100% annually

Implementation strategy: Achieve total clean electricity use in federal real property

Departmental action Performance indicator
starting point
target
How the departmental action contributes to the FSDS goal and target and, where applicable, to Canada's 2030 Agenda National Strategy and SDGs
  • Purchase megawatt hours of renewable electricity by participating in Power Purchase Agreements where available
  • Program: Internal Services
  • Performance indicator: Percentage (%) of electricity consumption from clean electricity generation
  • Starting point: In 2018 to 2019 fiscal year, 74% of electricity consumption was clean electricity
  • Target: Use 100% clean electricity by 2025
The use of clean electricity eliminates greenhouse gas emissions in jurisdictions with emitting generation sources
  • Performance indicator: Percentage (%) of clean electricity purchased
  • Starting Point: In 2018 to 2019, 74% of electricity purchased was clean electricity
  • Target: Purchase 100% clean electricity by 2025
Goal 13

Goal 13: Take action on climate change and its impacts

FSDS context

The CFIA is committed to transitioning to net-zero carbon and climate-resilient operations, while also reducing environmental impacts beyond carbon, including on waste, water and biodiversity. Effort to manage the CFIA's climate change risks and vulnerabilities will support the National Adaptation Strategy and complement adaptation actions planned and implemented by our domestic and international partners.

Target theme: Federal leadership on greenhouse gas emissions reductions and climate resilience

Target: The Government of Canada will transition to net-zero carbon operations for facilities and conventional fleets by 2050 (all Ministers)

Implementation strategy: Implement the Greening Government Strategy through measures that reduce greenhouse gas emissions, improve climate resilience, and green the government's overall operations

Departmental action Performance indicator
starting point
target
How the departmental action contributes to the FSDS goal and target and, where applicable, to Canada's 2030 Agenda National Strategy and SDGs
  • Develop a real property strategy assessing current and future program and space requirements to optimize our real property portfolio holdings to meet future program needs
  • Conduct carbon neutral studies at all major facilities
  • Convert or replace by 2030 existing heating, ventilation, and air conditioning and refrigeration (HVAC-R) systems that use high global warming potential refrigerants, ozone depleting refrigerants and hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs)
  • Recommission large energy-intensive buildings on a regular cycle and/or implement smart building technology
  • Program: Internal Services
  • Performance indicator: Percentage (%) change in GHG emissions from facilities from 2005 to 2006 to current reporting fiscal year
  • Starting point: Percentage (%) change in GHG emissions from facilities in 2005 to 2006
  • GHG emissions from facilities in 2005 to 2006 (base year) was 26.7 ktCO2e
  • Target: Achieve 40% GHG emission reductions below 2005 levels by 2025
  • Identify a clear pathway forward for renovation and investment into major assets to meet the greening government goals
  • Ensure that energy efficient and low-carbon options are being considered in infrastructure and asset improvements over $5 million
  • Disclose the amount of embodied carbon in the structural materials of major construction projects by 2022 and reduce the embodied carbon by 30%, starting in 2025
  • Program: Internal Services
  • Performance indicator: Average percentage (%) in the reduction of embodied carbon in building materials of major construction projects where embodied carbon was minimized through the Life-Cycle assessment
  • Starting point: To be established in 2024 to 2025
  • Target: 30% for each major construction project
Tracking and disclosing embodied carbon in structural materials from major construction will enable the CFIA to identify low carbon options for materials
  • Develop a strategic approach and take actions to decarbonize fleets, (for example by using telematics analysis to right-size fleet) promoting behaviour change (through anti-idling campaigns, driver training), and; assessing ZEV charging infrastructure needs
  • Program: Internal Services
  • Performance indicator: Percentage (%) change in GHG emissions from fleet from 2005 to 2006 to current reporting fiscal year
  • Starting point: GHG emissions from fleet in 2005 to 2006 (base year) = 6.4 ktCO2e
  • Target: Reduce GHG emissions from conventional fleet by 40% from 2005 levels (6.4 ktC02e) by 2025 and to net zero by 2050
Rationalization of fleets via retirement of emitting vehicles can reduce GHG emissions

Target: The Government of Canada will transition to climate resilient operations by 2050 (all Ministers)

Implementation strategy: Reduce risks posed by climate change to federal assets, services and operations

Departmental action Performance indicator
starting point
target
How the departmental action contributes to the FSDS goal and target and, where applicable, to Canada's 2030 Agenda National Strategy and SDGs
  • Take action to improve understanding of the risks posed by the impacts of climate change to federal assets, services and operations by revising the CFIA's climate change risk and vulnerability assessment every 5 years
  • Developing and updating on an annual basis a CFIA Climate Change Adaptation Action Plan to support addressing risks and vulnerabilities identified under the Assessment
  • Programs:
    Internal Services
  • Setting rules for plant health
  • Setting rules for food safety and consumer protection
  • Setting rules for animal health
  • Performance indicator: Percentage (%) of CFIA's climate change adaptation actions completed
  • Starting point : No data (plan not released)
  • Target: 50% in 2026 to 2027
  • Relevant targets or ambitions:
    GIF target 13.2 Integrate climate change measures into national policies, strategies and planning
  • GIF target 13.3: Improve education, awareness-raising and human and institutional capacity on climate change mitigation, adaptation, impact reduction and early warning
  • Increase training and support on assessing climate change impacts, and facilitating sharing of best practices and lessons learned
  • Program: Internal Services
  • Performance indicator: Percentage (%) of CFIA employees that completed a Canada School of Public Service climate change course
  • Starting point: To be established in 2024 to 2025
  • Target: 20% in 2026 to 2027
  • Incorporate climate change considerations into business continuity planning and real property
  • Program: Internal Services
  • Performance indicator: Completion of an agency-wide business continuity plan (BCP) that incorporates climate change considerations
  • Starting point: As of 2023, numerous site-specific BCPs taking into consideration all hazards including climate change
  • Target: An agency-wide BCP incorporating climate change considerations, and supported by guidance and tools, will be completed by the end of 2025 to 2026
  • Conduct climate resiliency assessments at all agency-owned properties
  • Start to address risks identified in climate resiliency assessments for each agency-owned property
  • Integrating climate change adaptation into the design, construction and operation aspects of all major real property projects
  • Apply climate-resilient building guidance being developed by National Research Council Canada
  • Increase training and facilitate sharing of best practices and lessons learned
  • Program: Internal Services
  • Performance indicator: Percentage (%) of agency-owned properties for which climate resiliency assessments have been completed
  • Starting point: 0%; no assessments completed to date
  • Target: Complete climate resiliency assessments for 50% (10 of 19) of CFIA facilities by 2025 to 2026
  • Undertaking climate resiliency assessments of facilities in the real property portfolio will identify technologies, practices and strategies, and also determine the investment required to make the facilities and operations climate resilient
  • Addressing risks identified through climate resiliency assessments will achieve climate resilient operations in the facilities
  • Performance indicator: Percentage (%) of high-risk action items implemented from climate resiliency assessments
  • Starting point: 0% in 2022 to 2023
  • Target: Implement 100% of all high-risk action items from completed assessments by 2006 to 2027

Initiatives advancing Canada's implementation of SDG 13 – Climate action

The following initiatives demonstrate how the CFIA programming supports the 2030 Agenda and the SDGs, supplementing the information outlined above.

Planned initiatives Associated domestics targets or ambitions and/or global targets
Supporting timely product registrations issued under the Fertilizers Act. This will help facilitate market access for Canadian farmers and growers to innovative fertilizers, fertilizer additives and other products that are specifically formulated to limit GHG emissions from agriculture, and which offer alternatives to chemical fertilization regimes (such as nitrification inhibitors, microbial supplements, plant biostimulants, etc.) GIF target 13.2: Integrate climate change measures into national policies, strategies and planning
Goal 15

Goal 15: Protect and recover species, conserve Canadian biodiversity

FSDS context

As Canada's national plant protection organization, the CFIA regulates the import and movement of plants, plant products and other things into and within, Canada; monitors imports to prevent entry of invasive plants and other plant pests; and conducts surveillance to determine the presence of invasive plant pests, or to confirm that an area is free of a specific invasive plant pest.

Target theme: Species protection and recovery

Implementation strategies supporting the goal

This section is for implementation strategies that support the goal "Protect and recover species, conserve Canadian biodiversity" but not a specific FSDS target.

Implementation strategy: Prevent, detect, respond to, control and manage invasive alien species that are pests of plants

Departmental action Performance indicator
starting point
target
How the departmental action contributes to the FSDS goal and target and, where applicable, to Canada's 2030 Agenda National Strategy and SDGs
  • Develop and implement risk management measures, including regulatory programs, for new invasive plants, plant pests and pathways to limit the impact of invasive plants and other plant pests on Canada's environmental resources, forests and agricultural lands
  • Promote compliance with import and domestic phyto-sanitary requirements including cargo and facility inspections and audits of alternative service delivery programs
  • Establish biocontainment levels for plant pests that are new, emerging or whose range is expanding, and regulate the biocontainment and biosecurity requirements that are needed to work safely with plant pests of quarantine significance, and to protect laboratory staff, the Canadian public, and the environment
  • Collaborate with all Canadians, through a citizen and community science approach, to prevent the introduction of invasive alien species
  • Consult Canadians on regulatory, program or policy options for new invasive plants, plant pests, and pathways
  • Program: Setting rules for plant health
  • Performance indicator: Number of foreign plant pests that have entered and established themselves in Canada
  • Starting point: 0 in 2022 to 2023
  • Target: 0
  • The CFIA minimizes the introduction and spread of invasive alien species that affect Canada's plant resources by promoting compliance with regulations and carrying out enforcement activities
  • Relevant targets or ambitions:
    GIF target 15.8: By 2020, introduce measures to prevent the introduction and significantly reduce the impact of invasive alien species on land and water ecosystems and control or eradicate the priority species
  • Performance indicator: Percentage (%) of regulated plant pests that had previously entered and established in Canada and whose spread (other than what would be expected by natural spread) was successfully limited by CFIA control programs, by year
  • Starting point: 78.1% in 2022 to 2023
  • Target: At least 95% annually
  • Create and deliver communications products and outreach activities to encourage Canadians and engage youth to prevent the spread and impacts of invasive alien species, for example, strategic distribution of products, pest-related workshops and seminars and community science opportunities.
  • Program: Setting rules for plant health
  • Performance indicator: Number of outreach and educational activities conducted
  • Starting point: 14 in 2021 to 2022
  • Target: ≥10 annually
Outreach and awareness activities and campaigns such as "Don't move firewood" and messaging both online and in print help to reinforce the shared responsibility of managing invasive species. Examples include paid and unpaid social media, brochures, proactive media and stakeholder outreach, news releases on findings and changes in regulated areas, web content, internal communications, partnerships with other government departments and stakeholders, meetings and conferences, and media interviews
  • Performance indicator: Number of engagement activities with youthTable note 1
  • Starting point: To be established in 2023 to 2024
  • Target: 4 activities annually
  • Participate in international fora such as the International Plant Protection Convention and the North American Plant Protection Organization
  • Foster partnerships with trading partners, national and provincial invasive species councils and agricultural, forestry horticultural and transportation stakeholders
  • Program: Setting rules for plant health
  • Performance indicator: Number of new partnerships with international or domestic entities to prevent, detect, respond to, control and manage invasive alien species that are pests of plants
  • Starting point: 30 new partnerships in 2021 to 2022
  • Target: 3 or more new partnerships completed annually
  • The CFIA works with international and domestic partners and stakeholders to minimize threats to plant resources, such as plant pests
  • Relevant targets or ambitions:
    GIF target 15.8: By 2020, introduce measures to prevent the introduction and significantly reduce the impact of invasive alien species on land and water ecosystems and control or eradicate the priority species

Initiatives advancing Canada's implementation of SDG 15 – Life on land

The following initiatives demonstrate how the CFIA's programming supports the 2030 Agenda and the SDGs, supplementing the information outlined above.

Planned initiatives Associated domestics targets or ambitions and/or global targets
Contributing to promoting sustainable development in developing countries as recorded using the Total Official Support for Sustainable Development (TOSSD) international standard GIF target 15.a: Mobilize and significantly increase financial resources from all sources to conserve and sustainably use biodiversity and ecosystems

Section 5: Integrating sustainable development

The CFIA will continue to ensure that its decision-making process includes consideration of FSDS goals and targets through its Strategic Environmental Assessment (SEA) processFootnote 1. An SEA for a policy, plan or program proposal includes an analysis of the impacts of the given proposal on the environment, including on relevant FSDS goals and targets.

Public statements on the results of the CFIA's assessments are made public when an initiative that has undergone a detailed SEA. The purpose of the public statement is to demonstrate that the environmental effects, including the impacts on achieving the FSDS goals and targets, of the approved policy, plan or program have been considered during proposal development and decision making.

The CFIA will further integrate sustainable development considerations into national policies, strategies and planning by integrating intersectional factors into decision making through the implementation of the Gender Based Analysis Plus and Assessment of Modern Treaty Impacts. More broadly, the CFIA will continue to promote sustainable development in developing countries using the Total Official Support for Sustainable Development (TOSSD) international standard.

Building on our understanding of the risks posed by the impacts of climate change on our assets, services and operations across the country, the CFIA aims to take action to reduce those risks through measures identified under its Climate Change Action Plan.

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