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2021 to 2022 Departmental Plan

From the Minister

Minister of Health

As the Minister of Health, I am pleased to present the Canadian Food Inspection Agency's (CFIA) 2021 to 2022 Departmental Plan. This Plan outlines the important initiatives that CFIA, a science-based regulatory agency, delivers on behalf of all Canadians – both today and into the future.

As the Government of Canada led the work to address the unprecedented challenges posed by the COVID-19 global pandemic, CFIA worked diligently with partners and stakeholders at all levels, on both domestic and international stages, to fulfill its mandate to safeguard food safety, protect the health of plants and animals in Canada, and support market access. CFIA has continued to perform the critical activities and deliver needed services to preserve the integrity of Canada's food safety system, so that Canadians have continued to have access to safe food.

To keep pace with rapid growth in international trade, emerging technologies, and new threats to food, plants and animals, in January 2021, the Government of Canada announced an investment of $162.6 million over the next 5 years and $40 million per year after that to strengthen CFIA and to grow exports. Through this investment, CFIA will be better positioned to increase food controls enacted through the Safe Food for Canadians Regulations.

January 2021 saw the second anniversary of the Safe Food For Canadians Regulations coming into force. CFIA continues to work with stakeholders on broad regulatory renewal that moves away from the traditional prescriptive regulations of the past towards a more nimble, preventive, modern regulatory approach that can anticipate and adapt to the dynamic global environment in which we operate.

CFIA has been proactively working to provide industry with digital services, and the onset the COVID-19 pandemic accelerated those efforts. Employees working in establishments, at laboratories or remotely are being supported by the hardware and software needed to do their jobs day-to-day. On the business side, CFIA continues to add services to My CFIA – CFIA's online platform – so that industry can request and obtain permissions online including for various licenses, registrations and permits.

The dedicated and professional employees of CFIA continue to deliver important initiatives, such as food labelling modernization, the Canadian Food Safety Information Network, the Boat-to-plate Traceability program, fighting food fraud, assessing climate change impacts, preparedness and response for African swine fever and other animal health matters, safeguarding Canada's plant resources, supporting market access at home and abroad as well as alerting Canadians to all manner of food recalls.

To learn about these initiatives and how CFIA is contributing to the health and well-being of all Canadians, I invite you to read the 2021 to 2022 Departmental Plan.

The Honourable Patty Hajdu, PC, MP
Minister of Health

Plans at a glance

Science is the driving force behind the Canadian Food Inspection Agency's (CFIA) quest to implement, maintain and enforce amendments to

CFIA's work enhances the health of Canadians, the environment and our economy. To keep pace with the many changes in the domestic and global environment, CFIA will continue working with partners at home and abroad to modernize regulatory frameworks and service delivery models, while aligning with the Minister of Health mandate letter priorities.

CFIA's key planning highlights for 2021 to 2022

In 2021 to 2022, CFIA will continue to work on the following

Beyond2020

Safe food. Healthy animals. Disease and pest-free plants. CFIA is always looking towards the future and how to better serve Canadians and industry. Looking beyond 2020, being adaptable and responsive to changes and evolving risks is crucial to CFIA's future success. CFIA is laying out this groundwork by launching "CFIA 2025: Building for the Future" – a new framework that examines the following ways to improve how CFIA delivers its mandate.

Agile regulations

CFIA is an engaged participant in the Government of Canada's continuing efforts to reform regulations to better meet the needs of Canadians. By using means such as incorporation by reference, as will be introduced into the compositional standards, regulations will be able to be amended faster and easier.

Efficient oversight

Looking at novel ways to further CFIA business intelligence into the future that includes making use of new scientific methods, state-of-the-art technologies and partnerships that helps CFIA identify and mitigate risk. For example data collected from pilot programs, such as the Modernized Slaughter Inspection Program, provide CFIA with important data that can be used to plan where resources are needed most. By proceeding methodically through the use of pilots, CFIA is able to create stronger programs more efficiently.

Enabled workforce

CFIA was already equipping personnel with advanced technology to work remotely from the office. COVID-19 forced CFIA to accelerate the issuance of modern technological devices to all personnel to keep CFIA working in a consistent manner.

Stakeholder empowerment

Through the introduction of My CFIA, stakeholders are now able to accomplish more business on-line than ever before. With access to the information and tools they need via an electronic platform, Canadians and industry alike will be empowered to make informed choices and comply with regulatory requirements.

Gender-based Analysis Plus

CFIA works with Health Canada (HC) and the Public Health Agency of Canada (PHAC) to support Gender-based Analysis Plus (GBA+) assessments when mitigating the health risks associated with specific foods for children, pregnant women, older adults and other populations.

In 2021 to 2022, CFIA will renew its GBA+ action plan, develop in-house training to increase skills and awareness on the application of GBA+, and explore "lived experiences" for improved client understanding.

Open and transparent government

In support of Open Government, CFIA is committed to continuing to provide more relevant, accurate and timely information on efforts to safeguard food, animals and plants. In 2021 to 2022, CFIA has committed to aligning with Canada's fifth National Action Plan on Open Government and the Government of Canada's Digital Operations Strategic Plan 2020 to 2024.

CFIA's response to COVID-19

In 2020 to 2021, CFIA delivered its mandate while following guidance from PHAC and local public health authorities on the COVID-19 pandemic. CFIA took steps to keep their personnel safe by reducing their on-site presence at CFIA offices, in federal food establishments and in other regulated parties' premises, and by finding new ways to carry out regular activities.

An important element of CFIA's management strategy to prevent, control and prepare for resurgence of COVID-19 is sufficient testing capacity across Canada. Working with PHAC, CFIA has implemented 2 federal regional testing hubs at the Ottawa and Lethbridge laboratories. In 2021 to 2022, these COVID-19 surge-capacity testing sites will continue to provide technical screening, as needed, of SARS-CoV-2 in human clinical samples. This will further support provincial, territorial and federal institutions that require laboratory diagnostic testing.

The COVID-19 pandemic reinforced the importance of setting risk-based priorities and delivering essential services. CFIA will continue to apply the lessons learned from this pandemic and explore flexible delivery of services and inspection oversight to help produce and move safe goods during public health emergencies.

Core responsibility: planned results and resources, and key risks

Safe Food and healthy plants and animals

Description

CFIA is dedicated to safeguarding food, animals and plants, which enhances the health and well-being of Canadians, the environment and Canada's economy.

Planning highlights

The health and safety of Canadians is the driving force behind the design and development of CFIA programs. With industry, consumers and federal, provincial, territorial and municipal organizations, CFIA continues to work to protect Canadians from preventable health risks related to food and zoonotic diseases – diseases that affect both animals and humans. As a global leader, CFIA works to improve international standards, fairness in trade practices and regulatory cooperation to advance market access for Canadian products.

Departmental result 1: food sold in Canada is safe and accurately represented to Canadians

Description

Through the delivery of its programs, CFIA administers and enforces legislation that aims to mitigate risks to consumers. These risks are associated with potential hazards in the food supply system. CFIA manages food safety emergencies and incidents by collaborating with federal, provincial and territorial food safety partners and industry.

Planning highlights

Regulatory amendments

CFIA has planned the following regulatory amendments for 2021 to 2022

Modernized slaughter inspection program

The modernized slaughter inspection program (MSIP) moves CFIA from hands-on activities to a regulatory oversight approach that is based on science and risk. Such an approach involves industry taking over full responsibility for the quality of their products, under CFIA oversight, while CFIA continues to focuses on inspection activities that are critical to the humane treatment of animals, the safety of the meat products and areas of highest risk.

Additional hog-slaughter facilities will be transitioned onto MSIP in 2021 to 2022. Building on this success, CFIA is currently consulting on a similar model applicable to beef. This supports the development of a modernized slaughter inspection model in beef, improves food safety, and contributes to the overall health and safety of Canadians and economic growth.

Food fraud

Food misrepresentation (a form of food fraud) deceives consumers, damages market fairness and confidence, and could potentially expose Canadians to health and safety risks. Budget 2019 provided $24.4 million over 5 years for CFIA to enhance federal capacity to detect non-compliance and take enforcement action against instances of this form of food fraud, including those that may introduce health and safety risks to Canadians. This initiative is part of the Minister of Agriculture and Agri-Food's mandate commitment to implement the Food Policy for Canada. Under the Food Policy for Canada, CFIA, with support from HC, is taking action to prevent, detect and deter food misrepresentation. CFIA will work with international partners to share information and best practices in the management of food authenticity and food fraud risks.

CFIA promotes awareness and engagement with stakeholders on its dedicated "food fraud" website.

In 2021 to 2022, CFIA plans to: target inspections of additional commodities at high risk for such kinds of fraud; verify compliance; and take enforcement action as appropriate. CFIA will monitor its ability to detect and respond to these risks, and provide updates on progress via regular reporting and on its website page dedicated to food fraud.

Boat-to-plate traceability

The Minister of Health is mandated to develop a boat-to-plate traceability program for fish and seafood to help Canadian fishers better market their high-quality products. CFIA is leading the work with Fisheries and Oceans Canada (DFO) and Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada (AAFC), including the development of a joint discussion paper with DFO and AAFC to consult with stakeholders. In 2021 to 2022, the feedback from this consultation will be analyzed and recommendations will be developed on measures to fulfill the mandate commitment.

Establishment-based Risk Assessment model for food

CFIA continues to integrate fresh fruit and vegetables, manufactured food and imports into the Establishment-based Risk Assessment (ERA) model for food. CFIA is developing a work tasking logic model, a digital tool that will use ERA results to allocate resources to higher-risk areas. In 2021 to 2022, work will continue to formalize the development of the Information Management and Information Technology (IMIT) solution to digitally integrate ERA risk results into tactical planning in near real time.

Canadian Food Safety Information Network

The Canadian Food Safety Information Network (CFSIN) is a CFIA-led initiative that links federal, provincial and territorial food safety authorities across Canada. CFSIN launched its technical platform in September 2020. The platform provides partners with the ability to collaborate online to better anticipate, detect and respond to food safety incidents and emergencies.

In 2021 to 2022, CFIA will lead key pieces of collaborative work on the CFSIN platform. These include an approach to improving food safety surveillance and the establishment of associated working groups and utilizing CFSIN to foster more coordinated approaches to food safety across communities.

Food surveillance review

Surveillance activities, such as sampling and testing, are an important source of information that helps CFIA to identify and manage risks to human health. CFIA is continuing a multi-year review of its food safety surveillance activities to identify opportunities to improve the effectiveness of these activities. In 2021 to 2022, CFIA will begin to implement a 24-month work plan based on review findings to date in order to ensure the highest food safety risks are prioritized. This action plan will strengthen the design and delivery of food surveillance activities, including improving the efficiency and cost-effectiveness of existing programs and the identification of additional use for alternative service delivery.

Additions to CFIA's testing repertoire

CFIA will lead an assessment of commercially available testing kits for marine shellfish toxins. The assessment will determine the suitability of the kits for use by industry and remote communities to check the safety of harvested shellfish.

In 2021 to 2022, CFIA will lead a research project with the Food Allergy Research and Resource Program (FARRP) at the University of Nebraska–Lincoln. CFIA will be seeking to determine if a method of detecting soy allergens, developed by FARRP, is suitable for supporting regulatory compliance actions. Allergens pose a serious food safety risk. Using new diagnostic tools to confirm allergen results strengthens CFIA's ability to protect the health and safety of Canadians.

Offshore program activities

CFIA collaborates with other countries' competent authorities and industry to help Canada's trading partners meet Canadian food requirements and prevent unsafe food from entering the Canadian marketplace. Through the offshore program, CFIA gathers information and data to better manage risks associated with imported foods.

In 2021 to 2022, to proactively address food safety risks at the source, CFIA will continue to conduct the following offshore program activities, as appropriate, including:

Departmental result 2: plant and animal resources are protected from diseases and pests and are safe for Canadians and the environment

Description

Canadians expect the health of animals, plants and forests to be safeguarded. To effectively and efficiently deter and contain pests and prevent plant and animal diseases, CFIA must keep pace with a changing climate. CFIA must also keep up with the rapid rate of technological advancements and scientific breakthroughs while maintaining reliable and relevant services.

Planning highlights

Regulatory amendments

Canada's regulatory systems must adapt to keep pace with emerging threats, risks and challenges and enable industry to make informed risk management choices.

In 2021 to 2022, CFIA plans to advance the following important regulatory proposals:

Establishment-based Risk Assessment model for feed

In 2021 to 2022, CFIA will complete the development and performance assessment of the ERA model for feed mills. By assessing both animal health and food safety risks associated with feed mills, the model will help CFIA identify higher-risk feed mills. The of an oversight model will also help CFIA design its programs, prioritize its inspection activities and manage its resources. This approach will contribute to feed safety and protect the animal industry and the food chain.

Sidney Laboratory (Centre for Plant Health) – Network proof of concept

Did you know

Each year CFIA inspection staff complete over 15 plant health surveys. Survey priorities differ from year to year to target new pests. Survey site data are used for analysis, mapping and reporting.

Laboratories Canada (formerly Federal Science and Technology Infrastructure Initiative) is a whole of government 25-year strategy to renew its science infrastructure. CFIA, a key partner in this Public Services and Procurement Canada led initiative, is the lead for the Regulatory and Security Science Hub and the redevelopment of CFIAs Sidney Centre for Plant Health in Sidney, British Columbia.

The Sidney Centre for Plant Health is Canada's only post-entry quarantine, research, and diagnostic facility for tree fruit, grapevine, and small fruit, responsible for virus testing of these commodities in order to ensure the safe introduction of these materials into Canada. The centre will be a world-class plant health diagnostic and research facility that will provide CFIA and Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada scientists and partners with state-of-the-art amenities to advance plant science and address challenges in Canada.

Over the course of 2021-22, Laboratories Canada and CFIA will continue the advancement of the detailed design of the laboratory including network connectivity. As a pathfinder project for Laboratories Canada lessons learned and best practices will inform future science infrastructure projects. Completion of the new Sidney facility is anticipated in 2024.

Plant surveys

Leveraging the success of 2 pathfinder projects (2018 – Japanese beetle, and 2019 – LDD moth), CFIA has committed to delivering the plant survey 1-2-3 project. This project enhances standards for data collection and increases the efficiency of plant pest survey data collection and reporting. The plant survey 1-2-3 project captures and maps surveillance data in real time and provides real-time assignment tasks to inspectors. This improves CFIA's delivery and response speed, helping to protect Canada's plant resource base.

Risk intelligence and early warning

Did you know

Citizens can be scientists too! A citizen scientist in Quebec was the first to report the elm zigzag sawfly, an invasive species native to Asia, in North America in August 2020. CFIA is working with its partners and public to assess the extent of the pest's distribution in that province.

Visit Canada's Citizen Science Portal to find exciting ways to take part in science.

Protecting the health of animals in Canada is shared between federal, provincial and territorial governments and the industries they regulate. Risk intelligence and the interpretation of early warning signals helps prevent animal health risks before they affect the health of Canadians and the economy.

In 2021 to 2022, CFIA will

The Plant and Animal Health Strategy for Canada

The Plant and Animal Health Strategy for Canada provides a national vision to proactively address risks to the plant and animal resource base through collaborative partnerships. Planned priorities for the Canadian Plant Health Council in 2021 to 2022 include

Did you know

New diagnostic testing reflects CFIA's commitment to addressing emerging plant health risks. For example, implementing new diagnostic methods for detecting tomato brown rugose fruit virus in 2021 to 2022 will help enable market access for tomato seed exports.

CFIA will launch its plant health science mobilization plan in 2021. Through a collaborative approach, the plan advances scientific discoveries, innovations and applications as they relate to deliverables within the Plant and Animal Health Strategy for Canada. The plan's action-oriented approach will advance plant health science through collaboration, informed decision-making and strengthen Canada's position as a global leader in plant health protection.

In 2021 to 2022, CFIA will also continue to collaborate with the National Farmed Animal Health and Welfare Council on the implementation of the Plant and Animal Health Strategy. This paves the way towards Animal Health Canada. Canadians will benefit from the future-oriented move towards better coordinating animal health between industry, CFIA and provincial and territorial partners.

African swine fever

Did you know

In 2021 to 2022, CFIA and partners will implement new African swine fever (ASF) surveillance activities as part of the ASF action plan.

To keep African swine fever (ASF) out of Canada, federal, provincial, territorial and industry partners are working together to develop and implement a robust pan-Canadian action plan. Part of this action plan is a national compartmentalization program, in which enrolled premises that keep swine herds operate under a common biosecurity management system and contain a population with a distinct health status with respect to ASF for which required surveillance, control, and biosecurity measures have been applied. The goal of this program is to maintain the export of swine and pork products if an outbreak of ASF occurs in Canada. The National Centre for Foreign Animal Disease is working on expanding diagnostic methods to detect ASF in domestic and wild pigs.

In 2021 to 2022, under the ASF action plan, CFIA will continue to build Canada's capacity in disease spread modelling by collaborating with provinces and territories, academia and international partners to answer preparedness questions.

Canadian Plant Health Information System

Did you know

Potatoes are one of Canada's most economically valuable horticultural crops. CFIA monitors for potato wart, a quarantine pest caused by the fungal pathogen Synchytrium endobioticum. Monitoring supports the international trade of Canadian seed potatoes. CFIA will continue surveillance testing of this pest in 2021 to 2022, after finding the potato wart in Canada in 2020.

CFIA will adapt and test the CFSIN platform to provide plant health partners access to a virtual collaboration space, laboratory mapping tool, and environmental horizon scanning. Branded as the Canadian Plant Health Information System (CPHIS), this suite of online tools will be a cloud-based solution for integrating innovation with regulatory action when dealing with new and emerging threats to Canadian plants. CPHIS will enable the collection, analysis and sharing of research, surveillance and diagnostic information to support evidence based decision making among plant health communities. Ultimately, information sharing is a key deliverable under the strategic priorities laid out by the Canadian Plant Health Council within key area of action arising from the 2017 Plant and Animal Health Strategy for Canada.

Departmental result 3: Canadian food, plants and animals and their associated products can be traded internationally

Description

CFIA supports government trade priorities, and opens and maintains Canadian businesses' access to international markets. This will enable the flow of safe food, plant and animal imports and exports, and will support the economy.

Planning highlights

International standard setting

CFIA actively participates in international forums to contribute to and influence the development of international standards for food safety, consumer protection and fair practices in food trade, plant and animal health and international trade rules that are consistent with Canada's objectives. These activities promote harmonization and facilitate predictable and transparent rules-based trade.

Did you know

CFIA is leading the development of an international consensus on assessing the environmental risk of genetically engineered plants through its work with the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD). Completion is expected in 2021. This document will be adopted by member countries and developing economies as a central guidance for environmental risk assessments.

In 2021 to 2022, CFIA will continue to

International regulatory cooperation and collaboration

CFIA collaborates with other countries to help advance international regulatory- and science-based initiatives. This means that Canada's regulatory systems are accepted internationally; regulatory and bilateral relationships are established and maintained; and associated risks are mitigated.

Did you know

CFIA's international engagement and work activities are taking place virtually because of the COVID-19 pandemic.

CFIA is adapting the use of different tools to evaluate food safety systems virtually with its foreign partners.

CFIA is also exploring the use of electronically signed health or phytosanitary export certificates to keep trade going and open new markets while protecting the integrity of the global food supply.

In 2021 to 2022, CFIA will continue to provide leadership and work with

Biosafety Level 4 Zoonotic Laboratory Network

The Biosafety Level 4 Zoonotic Laboratory Network (BSL4ZNet), led by CFIA, is an international network of government institutions; aiming to prepare and respond efficiently to current and future outbreaks caused by high-risk zoonotic pathogens. In 2021 to 2022, the BSL4ZNet, under the leadership of CFIA will conduct a strategic analysis of key lessons learned during the COVID-19 global pandemic to create a laboratory capabilities roadmap to enhance our preparedness against future outbreaks. Through this work CFIA and the BSL4ZNet partner institutions aim to systematically improve capacity for robust diagnostic methods and laboratory inter-operability, enhance research collaborations and training. This effort will enhance Canada's continuing disease preparedness efforts.

Market access support

Many of the challenges to the global trade environment in 2020 continue. These challenges include trade uncertainty and protectionism, shifting consumer preferences, animal diseases and an increase in new and complex regulatory requirements that affect the export of Canadian commodities to several markets. CFIA provides the technical expertise needed to facilitate the opening, re-opening, expansion and maintenance of markets, while advancing issues related to food safety, animal and plant health, and organic products.

In 2021 to 2022, CFIA will:

Gender-based Analysis Plus (GBA+)

CFIA is committed to incorporating GBA+ into its decision-making to consider the diverse needs and potential impacts of its programs, services and policies on vulnerable populations. In 2021 to 2022, CFIA will

Experimentation

As a science-based regulator, CFIA recognizes the need to continually test assumptions and experiment with novel approaches to existing and new problems. CFIA continues to extend this approach and culture into the program design and delivery areas, ultimately modernizing the way CFIA works.

Some examples of experiments at CFIA include the following

Innovative Solutions Canada

The Innovative Solutions Canada (ISC) program is designed to stimulate growth of small businesses, while providing federal departments and agencies with opportunities to develop new capabilities to meet their functional program delivery needs. In 2021 to 2022, CFIA will continue to develop, manage and implement the ISC program. To meet the funding targets allocated to ISC, CFIA will identify opportunities in plant health, animal health and food safety, including the further development of marine biotoxin detection devices and foot-and-mouth disease vaccine matching. CFIA can then establish contracts and/or grant agreements with successful applicants.

Remotely piloted air systems (drones)

Over the next year, CFIA will be experimenting with using remotely piloted air systems (RPAS, or drones). As of fall 2020, CFIA has 3 drones that will be undertaking basic field tests to assess their benefits. Field testing is ongoing in southern Alberta, with testing in other areas in the future. The goal of field testing is to compare the available RPAS' with standard inspection activities, noting where their use could help increase efficiency and effectiveness of plant protection and animal health-related activities. In particular, CFIA is assessing the value of using RPAS' in real-time aerial imagery, GPS coordinates and improved mapping capabilities.

As part of this initiative, CFIA continues to build on its strong relationships with other government departments and agencies, learning what partners have done and sharing information on CFIA testing efforts across the Government of Canada.

Virtual inspection technology

CFIA is increasing its experimental use of digital tools and services, and is committed to providing front-line staff with access to new technology to help complete their work more efficiently. CFIA is currently testing the use of augmented reality, mixed reality and mobile device solutions for front-line staff. Though the possible uses are endless, CFIA's initial experiments relate to improving training, increasing ease of access for consultation between front-line staff and CFIA specialists, and increasing the capacity to work and provide services using virtual technology.

Comparative Risk Model

CFIA will continue to experiment with its foundational risk model, the Comparative Risk Model, by continuing to integrate multiple types and lenses of risk in an all-hazards' approach to understanding and documenting risk and control to the public interest.

Building on methodology developed in 2020 to 2021, CFIA will include socioeconomic and GBA+ analyses in its foundational Comparative Risk Model. Through this lens, CFIA will examine how risk and mitigation strategies affect different populations. The added information will support design and delivery of programming.

In addition to considering how risk affects different populations, CFIA will explore the impact of climate change on risk and control, and on optimizing risk mitigation. New methods of capturing risk information from both inside and outside CFIA will be explored to improve data and automation.

Key risks for core responsibility: safe food and healthy plants animals

Key Risk: Climate Change

Climate change continues to accelerate and affect Canada in many ways.

CFIA's planned risk mitigation strategies include:

Setting Departmental Sustainable Development Strategy (DSDS) goals:

As part of the Government of Canada's Federal Sustainable Development Strategy (FSDS) goals, CFIA is focusing on:

  • greening government
  • sustainably managed lands and forests
  • sustainable food

CFIA published a DSDS for 2020–2023 and will table a new strategy every 3 years.

Designate a central point within CFIA to coordinate risks internally and externally:

CFIA has assessed the climate change risks to its mandate.

CFIA is looking to designate a central point from which to coordinate internally and externally to better respond to the challenges of climate change.

Modernize regulations:

Continue to modernize regulations to maintain a key role as a global leader in the development of sustainable activities.

Key Risk: Globalization

Access to a wider range of products from around the world and changing consumer preferences is a key risk.

CFIA's planned risk mitigation strategies include:

Work with partners to develop international standards:
Work closely with other government departments and international bodies to prioritize the development of international standards.
Prevent the entry into or spread of regulated plant pests and animal diseases in Canada:
Prevent the entry into or spread of regulated plant pests and animal diseases in Canada, and manage the risk associated with any introduction.
Refine the Standard Inspection Procedure (SIP):
Refine the SIP to develop a stronger food safety system that enables industry to innovate and respond to emerging risks and developments.

Key Risk: Innovation and science

Keeping pace with the ever-evolving scope of innovation, science and technology is a key risk. By addressing this risk, CFIA will keep its regulations, policies, programs and services current, effective and applicable to all existing core responsibilities.

FIA's planned risk mitigation strategies include:

Strengthening laboratory infrastructure:
Strengthening laboratory infrastructure to have better access to specialized expertise and knowledge in science
Laboratories Canada Strategy:
Developing an integrated, enterprise-wide approach to Canada's federal intramural science and technology (Laboratories Canada Strategy) to strengthen partnerships and improve collaboration, increase effectiveness and attract industry's leading talent
Enhancing the Canadian Food Safety Information Network (CFSIN):
Enhancing CFSIN to strengthen the ability of food safety authorities across Canada to better anticipate, detect and respond to incidents and emergencies by fostering collaboration among all parties involved. Adapting the CFSIN platform to provide similar benefits to plant health partners as part of the Canadian Plant Health Information System.
Government of Canada Open Science initiative:
Advancing the implementation CFIA's Open Science strategy to share scientific data and information in step with the federal Open Science Roadmap, including an update to CFIA's Scientific Publication Policy

Planned results for safe food and healthy plants and animals

Departmental result Departmental result indicator Target Date to achieve target 2017 to 2018
actual result
2018 to 2019
actual result
2019 to 2020
actual result
Food sold in Canada is safe and accurately represented to Canadians Percentage of food establishments that have addressed compliance issues upon follow-up or were brought into compliance, by year 75% to 85% March 31, 2022 Not available Table Note * Not available Table Note * Not available Table Note *
Percentage of higher risk food recalls that occurred prior to an adverse effect being reported to CFIA, by year 84% March 31, 2022 Not available Table Note * Not available Table Note * Not available Table Note *
Percentage of Canadians who agree that CFIA helps ensure that food sold in Canada is safe, by year At least 70% March 31, 2022 Not available Table Note * Not available Table Note * Not available Table Note *
Plant and animal resources are protected from diseases and pests and are safe for Canadians and the environment Number of harmful foreign plant pests that have entered and established themselves in Canada, by year 0 March 31, 2022 0 0 3
Percentage of plant inputs, products and by-products that comply with Canadian regulations and relevant international agreements, by year 95% March 31, 2022 90.7% 92.2% 92.33%
Percentage of animal inputs, products and by-products that comply with Canadian regulations and relevant international agreements, by year At least 95% March 31, 2022 Not available Table Note * Not available Table Note * Not available Table Note *
Percentage of regulated, harmful foreign plant pests that had previously entered and established in Canada and whose spread was successfully limited by CFIA control programs, by year At least 95% March 31, 2022 Not available Table Note * Not available Table Note * Not available Table Note *
Percentage of Canadian producers that have maintained or improved their status in programs designed to protect the health of animals, by year At least 95% March 31, 2022 Not available Table Note * Not available Table Note * Not available Table Note *
Rate of confirmed animal disease outbreaks per 100 investigations conducted by CFIA to limit the impact of animal health diseases within Canada, by year Less than 3 March 31, 2022 Not available Table Note * Not available Table Note * Not available Table Note *
Canadian food, plants and animals and their associated products can be traded internationally Number of international markets that are opened or maintained based on CFIA activities, by year 75 March 31, 2022 Not available Table Note * Not available Table Note * Not available Table Note *

Table Notes

Table note *

Historical result is not available as this is a new Departmental Results indicator for 2021 to 2022.

Return to table note *  referrer

Financial, human resources and performance information for CFIA's program inventory is available in the GC InfoBase.

Planned budgetary financial resources for safe food and healthy plants and animals

2021 to 2022 budgetary spending (as indicated in main estimates) 2021 to 2022 planned spending 2022 to 2023 planned spending 2023 to 2024 planned spending
624,607,906 624,607,906 645,413,821 631,189,354

Financial, human resources and performance information for CFIA's program inventory is available in the GC InfoBase.

Planned human resources for safe food and healthy plants and animals

2021 to 2022 planned full-time equivalents 2022 to 2023 planned full-time equivalents 2023 to 2024 planned full-time equivalents
5,060 5,122 5,048

Financial, human resources and performance information for CFIA's program inventory is available in the GC InfoBase.

Internal Services: planned results

Description

Internal services are groups of related activities and resources that the federal government considers to be services in support of programs and/or are required to meet an organization's corporate obligations. Internal services refers to the activities and resources of the 10 distinct services that support program delivery in the organization, regardless of the internal services delivery model in a department. These services are:

Planning highlights

Open and transparent government

In 2021 to 2022, CFIA has committed to aligning with Canada's fifth National Action Plan on Open Government and the Government of Canada's Digital Operations Strategic Plan 2020 to 2024. CFIA will adopt the revised data valuation methodology, established by the Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat (TBS) for high value datasets. CFIA will incorporate the transparency and open science criteria to its internal definition and develop a continuous annual dataset release plan that works towards meeting an established publishing target of its releasable high value datasets.

In the spirit of Open Government, CFIA is committed to openness and transparency with the goal of making its programs and services open by design. By providing more relevant, accurate and timely information, CFIA aims to allow Canadians to better understand how and why CFIA makes its regulatory decisions. By doing so, it will enable Canadians to make more informed decisions for themselves, their families and their businesses.

Human resources

CFIA is committed to the physical and psychological well-being of its employees and ensuring a culture of inclusiveness and respect that is free of harassment and discrimination.

CFIA will continue to enable its workforce by implementing its mental health strategy, working with bargaining agents to focus on supporting the wellness and well-being of employees and fostering a positive culture of awareness and stigma reduction. The mental health and well-being of our workforce remains a priority for CFIA and the public service as a whole, especially as we continue to navigate the COVID-19 pandemic.

In support of initiatives within the broader public service and the top priority outlined in the Clerk of the Privy Council's 27th Annual Report to the Prime Minister, CFIA will continue to work towards achieving a diverse workforce that is representative of the Canadians it serves. There will be a specific focus on increasing the representation of racialized groups, Indigenous people, and persons with disabilities to nurture deeper inclusion and embrace greater diversity.

CFIA will continue its efforts to modernize and strengthen core human resource service delivery in staffing and recruitment. Human resources activities will focus on having a representative workforce and recruiting talented people to help safeguard Canada's food, animals and plants. Efforts in 2021 to 2022 will concentrate on recruiting veterinarians, scientists and employment equity groups. Student recruitment remains a priority, with an emphasis on Indigenous students and students with disabilities.

Digital enablement

Did you know

CFIA is continuing to take its services online with My CFIA. This will make services such as applying for a licence or an export certificate more accessible than ever before to a greater number of Canadians.

In response to the COVID-19 pandemic alert, the Government of Canada and CFIA shifted priorities to accelerate IT delivery to quickly support the federal workforce undertaking critical work. A large number of employees were able to work remotely, and inspection staff could continue their work while minimizing risk and physical contact.

CFIA has adopted new ways of using data to support management in making decisions on risk and collecting information to support a more effective system of tracking and deploying resources to support critical priorities.

In 2021 to 2022, CFIA will continue to enhance digital enablement by:

Applications modernization

Delivery of CFIA's programs and services increasingly depends on IT applications and platforms. CFIA is working to increase the digitization of inspections and services. Through Budget 2019, the Government of Canada proposed funding and legislative revisions so that regulatory departments and agencies can create more user-friendly regulatory systems. This included $27.2M over 5 years, starting in 2019 to 2020, for CFIA to continue digitizing its export certification activities. This is in line with the Government of Canada's commitment to providing Canadians with reliable, accessible and secure services that are seamless and digitally enabled.

In 2020 to 2021, CFIA began to modernize the first wave of at-risk applications that support service delivery across all of its business lines. CFIA identified the technical conditions, business value, life cycles and underlying technology of its applications and submitted cost estimates and a project plan to the TBS oversight team.

In 2021 to 2022, CFIA will proceed with the execution phase, which will include modernizing its IT applications, systems and infrastructure with a goal of implementing a modern, digital-first approach and bringing more digital tools and services to users.

Enhancing project management

CFIA has continued to strengthen its project management capabilities. This is in response to the new TBS Policy on the Planning and Management of Investments and new Directive on the Management of Projects and Programmes.

In 2021 to 2022, CFIA will:

Integrated National Real Property Portfolio Strategy

CFIA is developing an Integrated National Real Property Portfolio Strategy (INRPPS) as recommended by the TBS Horizontal Fixed Asset Review. The INRPPS is a multi-year strategy aimed at generating optimal functional and financial value from CFIA's real property (RP) portfolio for the government of Canada by bridging the current state of the portfolio and projected program requirements and CFIA's mandate and long-term vision. The INRPPS will set the strategic direction for the management of CFIA's RP portfolio and ensure that CFIA's RP is planned, acquired, used, maintained and disposed of in a manner that supports CFIA's delivery of programs and services to Canadians. Development of this strategy will also take into account CFIA`s operating environment, such as trends with regard to remote work.

In 2021 to 2022, CFIA will continue to develop the strategy, integrate program requirements and develop implementation plans, to ensure the management of RP within CFIA is reflective of balanced risks, benefits and returns to CFIA and the Government of Canada.

Agency Security Plan

CFIA is committed to sustaining and improving the security framework in an evolving threat environment, so that we can continue to achieve our strategic objectives and priorities. CFIA Security Plan 2020 to 2023 will be updated to respond to changes in the risk environment brought about by the COVID-19 pandemic. CFIA will continue its security programming and activities in alignment with the Policy on Government Security and related policies and directives in order to ensure the safety and protection of agency information, employees and assets.

Planned budgetary financial resources for Internal Services

2021 to 2022 budgetary spending (as indicated in main estimates) 2021 to 2022 planned spending 2022 to 2023 planned spending 2023 to 2024 planned spending
161,094,493 161,094,493 162,769,227 162,144,388

Planned human resources for Internal Services

2021 to 2022 planned full-time equivalents 2022 to 2023 planned full-time equivalents 2023 to 2024 planned full-time equivalents
1,005 1,005 1,005

Spending and human resources

This section provides an overview of the department's planned spending and human resources for the next 3 consecutive fiscal years and compares planned spending for the upcoming year with the current and previous years' actual spending.

Planned spending

Departmental spending 2018-2019 to 2023-2024. The following graph presents planned (voted and statutory) spending over time.

Planned spending graph. Description follows.
Description for planned spending graph
2018 to 2019 2019 to 2020 2020 to 2021 2021to 2022 2022 to 2023 2023 to 2024
Statutory 160 135 149 147 148 147
Voted 632 617 671 639 660 646
Total 792 752 820 786 808 793

This bar graph illustrates CFIA's actual spending for fiscal years 2018 to 2019 and 2019 to 2020, forecast spending for fiscal year 2020 to 2021 and planned spending for fiscal years 2021 to 2022, 2022 to 2023 and 2023 to 2024. Financial figures are presented in dollars along the y axis, increasing by $100 million and ending at $900 million. These are graphed against fiscal years 2018-2019 to 2023 to 2024 on the x axis. For each fiscal year, amounts for CFIA's program expenditures and statutory vote are identified.

In 2018 to 2019, actual spending was $160 million for statutory items, $632 million for program expenditures for a total of $792 million.

In 2019 to 2020, actual spending was $135 million for statutory items, $617 million for program expenditures for a total of $752 million.

In 2020 to 2021, forecast spending is $149 million for statutory items, $671 million for program expenditures for a total of $820 million.

Planned spending for statutory items goes from $147 million in 2021 to 2022, to $148 million in 2022 to 2023 and to $147 million in 2023 to 24. Planned spending for program expenditures goes from $639 million in 2021 to 2022, to $660 million in 2022 to 2023 and to $646 million in 2023 to 2024.

Total planned spending goes from $786 million in 2021 to 2022, to $808 million in 2022 to 2023 and to $793 million in 2023 to 2024.

Budgetary planning summary for core responsibilities and Internal Services (dollars)

The following table shows actual, forecast and planned spending for each of CFIA's core responsibilities and Internal Services for the years relevant to the current planning year.

Core responsibilities and Internal Services 2018 to 2019 expenditures 2019 to 2020 expenditures 2020 to 2021 forecast spending 2021 to 2022 budgetary spending (as indicated in main estimates) 2021 to 2022 planned spending 2022 to 2023 planned spending 2023 to 2024 planned spending
Safe food and healthy plants and animals 645,785,932 605,995,371 661,386,877 624,607,906 624,607,906 645,413,821 631,189,354
Subtotal 645,785,932 605,995,371 661,386,877 624,607,906 624,607,906 645,413,821 631,189,354
Internal Services 146,521,359 146,271,373 159,041,448 161,094,493 161,094,493 162,769,227 162,144,388
Total 792,307,291 752,266,744 820,428,325 785,702,399 785,702,399 808,183,048 793,333,742

Planned human resources

The following table shows actual, forecast and planned full-time equivalents (FTEs) for each core responsibility and Internal Services for the years relevant to the current planning year.

Human resources planning summary for core responsibilities and Internal Services

Core responsibilities and Internal Services 2018 to 2019 actual full‑time equivalents 2019 to 2020 actual full‑time equivalents 2020 to 2021 forecast full‑time equivalents 2021 to 2022 planned full‑time equivalents 2022 to 2023 planned full‑time equivalents 2023 to 2024 planned full‑time equivalents
Safe food and healthy plants and animals 5,187 5,097 5,213 5,060 5,122 5,048
Subtotal 5,187 5,097 5,213 5,060 5,122 5,048
Internal Services 974 959 1,019 1,005 1,005 1,005
Total 6,161 6,056 6,232 6,065 6,127 6,053

CFIA is forecasting an increase in spending for 2020 to 2021, primarily due to salary cost increase related to recently ratified collective agreements, one-time funding to maintain inspection capacity during COVID-19 pandemic and investments in CFIA for its core services.

The planned spending for fiscal year 2021 to 2022 is less than the forecast spending for fiscal year 2020 to 2021. This reduction is primarily due to the sunsetting of various initiatives. When including anticipated renewal of sunsetting resources, the planned spending is forecasted to be more stable.

Estimates by vote

Information on CFIA's organizational appropriations is available in the 2021 to 2022 Main Estimates.

Condensed future-oriented statement of operations

The condensed future‑oriented statement of operations provides an overview of CFIA's operations for fiscal year 2020 to 2021 to fiscal year 2021 to 2022.

The amounts for forecast and planned results in this statement of operations were prepared on an accrual basis. The amounts for forecast and planned spending presented in other sections of the Departmental Plan were prepared on an expenditure basis. Amounts may therefore differ.

A more detailed future oriented statement of operations and associated notes, including a reconciliation of the net cost of operations to the requested authorities, are available on CFIA's website.

Condensed Statement of Operations for the year ending March 31, 2022 (dollars)

Financial information 2020 to 2021 forecast results 2021 to 2022 planned results Difference (2021 to 2022 planned results minus 2020 to 2021 forecast results)
Total expenses 912,052,000 941,397,000 29,345,000
Total revenues 53,000,000 53,000,000 0
Net cost of operations before government funding and transfers 859,052,000 888,397,000 29,345,000

CFIA is anticipating a 3% increase in total expenses in fiscal year 2021 to 2022 compared to fiscal year 2020 to 2021. This change is mainly due to accrued salary increases as well as funding to maintain CFIA's core services, which is partially offset by the sunsetting of funding for some time limited initiatives.

Corporate information

Organizational profile

Appropriate minister(s): The Honourable Patty Hajdu, PC, MP
Institutional head: Siddika Mithani, Ph.D.
Ministerial portfolio: Health
Enabling instrument(s):

Year of incorporation / commencement: 1997

Raison d'être, mandate and role: who we are and what we do

Raison d'être

CFIA is a large science-based regulatory Agency with employees working across Canada in the National Capital Region and in 4 operational regions: Atlantic, Québec, Ontario and Western Canada.

CFIA is dedicated to safeguarding food , and animal and plant health, which enhances Canada's environment, economy, and the health and well-being of its residents. Additionally, to support market access, CFIA works with Canada's trading partners to verify that Canadian products meet importing countries' technical requirements, thus expanding, gaining, restoring or maintaining access to markets.

Mandate and role

In fulfilling its role as a science-based regulatory agency, CFIA serves Canadians by developing policies and strategies, conducting specialized laboratory tests, and monitoring industry practice and compliance with legislation, in order to

CFIA works with a variety of departments across all 3 levels of government, collaborates with stakeholders, and remains receptive to the values of interests groups. Together, all parties play a unique role in managing food, plant and animal risks, incidents and emergencies as they occur, and the implementation of appropriate measures and interventions where necessary.

For more information on the department's organizational mandate letter commitments, see the "Minister's mandate letter".

Operating context

CFIA operates within a rapidly changing context as Canada is inextricably linked to a global economy and international influences. Risks to the food system and animal and plant resources have changed considerably in recent years and will continue to evolve rapidly. A growing population and diverse consumer preferences have led to an increasing volume and variety of products on the market. Global commerce has brought new business models and consolidation in the food and agricultural industry. Emerging and disruptive technology requires a regulatory system that promotes responsible adoption of such technology for public good without stifling innovation.

While these changes provide opportunities for Canadians, they bring operational challenges to CFIA. For instance, risks to food safety, animal and plant health have increased as a result of expanded international trade, accelerated technological innovation, and an increasingly complex and global supply chain of agricultural products. In addition, climate change is introducing potential risks, such as the possibility of pests and diseases becoming established in Canada where they would not have been able in the past.

Reporting framework

CFIA's approved departmental results framework and program inventory for 2021 to 2022 are as follows.

Reporting framework. Description follows.
Description for Reporting framework

At the top of image, there is a table with four columns in a row.

The first column spans from the top to the bottom of the table with text rotated ninety degrees counter clockwise. The first column says:

  • Departmental Results Framework

The second column has multiple rows of boxes

The first box in the second column says:

  • Core Responsibility: Safe Food and healthy plants and animal

The second box in the second column says:

  • Departmental Result 1: Food sold in Canada is safe and accurately represented to Canadians

The third box in the second column says:

  • Departmental Result 2: Plant and animal resources are protected from diseases and pets and are safe for Canadians and the environment

The fourth box in the second column says:

  • Departmental Result 3: Canadian food, plants and animals and their associated products can be traded internationally

The third column has multiple rows that are aligned to the second box, third box, and the fourth box in the third column.

The first box in the third column is blank.

The second box in the third column is aligned to the "Departmental Result 1: Food sold in Canada is safe and accurately represented to Canadians" and it says:

  • Percentage of food businesses that comply with federal rules

The third box in the third column is aligned to the "Departmental Result 1: Food sold in Canada is safe and accurately represented to Canadians" and it says:

  • Percentage of Public Warnings for high risk food recalls that are issued within 24 hours of a recall decision

The fourth box in the third column is aligned to the "Departmental Result 2: Plant and animal resources are protected from diseases and pets and are safe for Canadians and the environment" and it says:

  • Number of harmful foreign pests that have entered and established themselves in Canada

The fifth box in the third column is aligned to the "Departmental Result 2: Plant and animal resources are protected from diseases and pets and are safe for Canadians and the environment" and it says:

  • Percentage of domestic seed, fertilizer, and new or modified plant varieties and products that comply with Canadian regulations and international agreements

The sixth box in the third column is aligned to the "Departmental Result 2: Plant and animal resources are protected from diseases and pets and are safe for Canadians and the environment" and it says:

  • Percentage of inspected loads of live animals that comply with federal humane transportation requirements

The seventh box in the third column is aligned to the "Departmental Result 2: Plant and animal resources are protected from diseases and pets and are safe for Canadians and the environment" and it says:

  • Number of cases of animal diseases that affect human and/or animal health that have entered into Canada

The eighth box in the third column is aligned to the "Departmental Result 3: Canadian food, plants and animals and their associated products can be traded internationally" and it says:

  • Number of shipments of Canadian goods that are rejected at foreign borders because they do not meet their import requirements

There is a blank row separating the first and second table.

The second table has two columns in a row.

The first column spans from the top to the bottom of the table with text rotated ninety degrees counter clockwise. The first column says:

  • Program Inventory

The second column has several rows.

The first row in the second column says:

  • Setting Rules for Food Safety and Consumer

The second row in the second column says:

  • Food Safety and Consumer Protection Compliance Promotion

The third row in the second column says:

  • Monitoring and Enforcement for Food Safety and Consumer Protection

The fourth row in the second column says:

  • Permissions for Food Products

The fifth row in the second column says:

  • Setting Rules for Plant Health

The sixth row in the second column says:

  • Plant Health Compliance Promotion

The seventh row in the second column says:

  • Monitoring and Enforcement for Plant Health

The eighth row in the second column says:

  • Permissions for Plant Products

The ninth row in the second column says:

  • Setting Rules for Animal Health

The tenth row in the second column says:

  • Animal Health Compliance Promotion

The eleventh row in the second column says:

  • Monitoring and Enforcement for Animal Health

The twelfth row in the second column says:

  • Permissions for Animal Products

The thirteenth row in the second column says:

  • International Standard Setting

The fourteenth row in the second column says:

  • International Regulatory Cooperation and Science Collaboration

The fifteenth row in the second column says:

  • International Market Access Support

Changes to the approved reporting framework since 2020 to 2021

In 2020 to 2021, CFIA amended its Departmental Results indicators:

The amendments made to these indicators better reflect CFIA's broad mandate and better support the Departmental Results.

Supporting information on the program inventory

Supporting information on planned expenditures, human resources and results related to the Canadian Food Inspection Agency's program inventory is available in the GC InfoBase.

Supplementary information tables

Departmental Sustainable Development Strategy

The Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) has been a voluntary participant in the Federal Sustainable Development Strategy (FSDS) since 2010. The FSDS is the Government of Canada's primary vehicle for sustainable development planning and reporting. It sets out sustainable development priorities, and establishes goals and targets. The 2019-2022 FSDS presents the Government of Canada's sustainable development activities, as required by the Federal Sustainable Development Act (S.C. 2008, c. 33) (FSDA). In keeping with the objectives of the FSDA to make environmental decision making more transparent and accountable to Parliament, CFIA supports the implementation of the 2019-2022 FSDS through the activities under its 2020-2023 Departmental Sustainable Development Strategy (DSDS).

Details on Transfer Payment Programs

Transfer Payment Programs (TPP) with total planned spending of $5 million or more

3‑year plan for compensation payments in accordance with requirements established by regulations under the Health of Animals Act (S.C. 1990, c. 21) and the Plant Protection Act (S.C. 1990, c. 22), and authorized pursuant to the Canadian Food Inspection Agency Act (S.C., 1997, c.6) - Statutory

Start date 1997 to 1998
End date Ongoing
Type of transfer payment Compensation payments
Type of appropriation Statutory authority under the Health of Animals Act (S.C. 1990, c. 21) and the Plant Protection Act(S.C. 1990, c. 22)
Fiscal year for terms and conditions 1997 to 1998
Link to departmental result(s) Safe food and healthy plants and animals
Link to the department's Program Inventory Monitoring and enforcement for plant health, monitoring and enforcement for animal health
Purpose and objectives of transfer payment program Compensate Canadians, in accordance with the appropriate regulations, for plants or animals ordered destroyed for the purpose of disease control.
Expected results In accordance with the Health of Animals Act and the Plant Protection Act, owners and/or producers will be compensated for ordered destruction of animals or plants for the purpose of disease control. Compensation will be provided according to the market value of the animals or plants.
Fiscal year of last completed evaluation 2019 to 2020
The evaluation of the Terrestrial Animal Health Program was completed in 2020. The evaluation included elements related to compensation.
Decision following the results of last evaluation Continuation
Fiscal year of next planned evaluation TBD
General targeted recipient groups Canadians who have had animals and/or plants ordered destroyed for the purpose of disease control.
Initiatives to engage applicants and recipients Information is provided to the eligible producers when animals and/or plants are ordered to be destroyed.

Transfer Payment Programs (TPP) with total planned spending of less than $5 million

3‑year plan for Innovative Solutions Canada (ISC)
Start date 2018 to 2019
End date 2021 to 2022
Type of transfer payment Grant
Type of appropriation Voted appropriation – annually through estimates
Fiscal year for terms and conditions 2018 to 2019
Link to departmental result(s) Safe food and healthy plants and animals
Link to the department's Program Inventory The ISC program is linked to all programs under CFIA's Program Inventory.
Purpose and objectives of transfer payment program The ISC program supports the generation of new and unique intellectual property (IP), stimulation of Research and Development collaborations, and growth of small businesses in the Canadian innovation ecosystem.
Expected results CFIA's Innovative Solutions Canada grants will promote the development of innovative approaches to improve sector outcomes.
Fiscal year of last completed evaluation N/A – new program
Decision following the results of last evaluation N/A
Fiscal year of next planned evaluation TBD
General targeted recipient groups Canadian small businesses
Initiatives to engage applicants and recipients Applicants and recipients engagement and consultation is conducted by Innovation, Science and Economic Development (ISED) Canada.
3‑year plan for Federal Assistance Program (FAP)
Start date 1997 to 1998
End date Ongoing
Type of transfer payment Contribution
Type of appropriation Voted appropriation – annually through estimates
Fiscal year for terms and conditions 2014 to 2015
Link to departmental result(s) Safe food and healthy plants and animals
Link to the department's Program Inventory The FAP is linked to all programs under CFIA's Program Inventory.
Purpose and objectives of transfer payment program The FAP supports projects and initiatives that advance CFIA's strategic outcome of a safe and accessible food supply and plant and animal resource base.
Expected results

The expected results include:

  1. scientific and technical knowledge is advanced and/or enhanced
  2. individual knowledge and skills are developed and/or improved
  3. international collaborations are expanded and/or strengthened, and
  4. organizations or initiatives are established or sustained
Fiscal year of last completed evaluation 2016 to 2017
Decision following the results of last evaluation Continuation
Fiscal year of next planned evaluation 2020 to 2021
General targeted recipient groups Eligible recipients include those whose goals and objectives are complementary to and supportive of CFIA's mission and strategic outcome. This includes individuals, groups of individuals, agriculture and commodity organizations, and conservation districts.
Initiatives to engage applicants and recipients Program managers conduct informal outreach and consultation with potential recipients to seek new project proposals that may be considered for support with FAP contributions.
Financial information (dollars)
Type of transfer payment 2020 to 2021 forecast spending 2021 to 2022 planned spending 2022 to 2023 planned spending 2023 to 2024 planned spending
Total grants 300,001 750,000 - -
Total contributions 600,000 600,000 600,000 600,000
Total other types of transfer payments 12,500,000 12,500,000 12,500,000 12,500,000
Total program 13,400,001 13,850,000 13,100,000 13,100,000

Gender-based Analysis Plus

General information

Institutional GBA+ capacity

CFIA will further integrate GBA+ and diversity into decision-making with semi-annual briefings and discussions at senior management tables and committees. This regular reporting will strengthen GBA+ implementation, performance and reporting on GBA+, diversity and COVID-19 activities for vulnerable groups, with results being shared with the Agriculture and Health portfolios, and Women and Gender Equality Canada.

Branch leads will be appointed to form a GBA+ Advisors Network in CFIA. The network will act as ambassadors to help mainstream GBA+ and share critical information and practices for more rigorous GBA+, equity, diversity and inclusion at CFIA.

In 2020 to 2021, CFIA renewed its three year GBA+ strategic action plan (2021 to 2023) focusing on GBA+ and Diversity mainstreaming in three primary areas:

  1. Culture: having a user-centric approach that values client relationships and a better understanding of their lived experiences.
  2. Knowledge: knowing our clients and sectors, and enhancing data by being accustomed to asking questions on potential needs and impacts.
  3. Skills: embracing the challenge of more rigorous GBA+ and having the ability to systematically apply GBA+ in all our work for Canadians.

To supplement Introduction to GBA+ online training, CFIA will focus on developing more hands-on GBA+ training with mandate-related themes, case studies and client-awareness activities to better understand impacts and needs.

Highlights of GBA+ results reporting capacity by program
Food Safety and Consumer Protection - Setting Rules, Compliance Promotion, Monitoring and Enforcement. Permissions for Food Products

Food Safety and Consumer Protection program initiatives align with the Poverty Reduction, Health and Well-being pillar of the Gender Results Framework.

CFIA recognizes the importance of using GBA+ in the development of its policies, programs and regulations. For programs related to Food Safety and Consumer Protection, though CFIA does not collect, monitor or evaluate gender disaggregated microdata in any of its forms at this time, CFIA does use Health and census information from Statistics Canada studies like the Census of Agriculture to consider such socio-economic factors as age, gender (woman-owned businesses), income (small – medium-sized businesses), race and geography.

Using GBA+ as a framework for strategic communications, engagement and data gathering on diverse stakeholder impacts and needs will provide CFIA with the essential evidence required for informed decision-making on CFIA policies, programs, regulations and other initiatives.

CFIA is committed to gathering more robust data on key client demographics and business factors such as geographic location, business size and types of activities, to develop tailored guidance, communications and engagement mechanisms to reach diverse populations and address barriers faced by its stakeholders. In its policy, program, and service activities, CFIA will continue to engage stakeholders and monitor client feedback to inform gender and diversity considerations, through surveys, My CFIA, and concerns raised through the Complaints and Appeals Office. Monitoring and evaluation strategies would be informed by this and other stakeholder interaction, then developed and conducted on a case by case basis.

In the spirit of continuous improvement, CFIA is working on initiatives internally and with partner government departments that could have positive impacts on gender and diversity factors such as supporting the development of a strategy with Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada to address gender gaps across the agriculture and agri-food value chain.

Animal Health - Setting Rules, Compliance Promotion, Monitoring and Enforcement. Permissions for Animal Products

Animal Health program initiatives align with the Economic Participation and Prosperity pillars of the Gender Results Framework.

CFIA will monitor and report on baseline factors such as income, geographic location and business size to analyze possible impacts, as well as partner with AAFC to develop a strategy to address gender and diversity gaps or opportunities across the agriculture and agri-food value chain.

Plant Health - Setting Rules, Compliance Promotion, Monitoring and Enforcement. Permissions for Plant Products

Plant Health program initiatives align with the Economic Participation and Prosperity pillars of the Gender Results Framework.

Though specific gender and diversity factor data is limited for this program, CFIA is committed to gathering more robust data on key client demographics and business factors such as geographic location, business size and types of activities. This will enable CFIA to develop tailored guidance, communications and engagement mechanisms to reach diverse populations and address barriers faced by its stakeholders. Using GBA+ as a framework for strategic data on diverse stakeholder impacts and needs will provide CFIA with the essential evidence required to evaluate projects, inform decision-making and future CFIA program initiatives and interventions.

International Standard Setting; Regulatory Cooperation and Science Collaboration; and Market Access Support

International program initiatives align with the Economic Participation and Prosperity; and Leadership and Democratic Participation pillars of the Gender Results Framework.

CFIA aims to advance the replacement of its paper-based system for issuing export certificates with digital tools to allow Canadian businesses to apply and receive reviewed forms online. The Digital Service Delivery Platform (DSDP) and its public-facing interface, My CFIA, will allow businesses to export their products more rapidly, support market diversification and long-term economic growth in the food, plant and animal sectors. It will also equip CFIA with quicker, more reliable data and reporting tools that will bolster CFIA's ability to effectively respond to possible outbreaks in Canada.

CFIA will monitor and mitigate any risk factors throughout the proposal's implementation and will gather feedback from staff and industry on design, content, functionality and usability. To advance the user experience, CFIA will identify opportunities for improvement and refine its implementation plan as needed. Further platform enhancements are expected to improve data related to export requests to better understand sectors, businesses and export trends. Along with ongoing engagement data, CFIA will continue to gather and analyze DSDP data to learn more about potential barriers, impacts and needs of CFIA's diverse clients and stakeholders then improve its programs and services accordingly. This program captures, at regular intervals, GBA+ metrics for some indicators, related to income, business size, geographic location and type of activities.

Horizontal initiatives

CFIA has no horizontal initiatives to report.

Up front multi year funding

CFIA has no multi-year funding.

United Nations 2030 Agenda and the Sustainable Development Goals

CFIA's contributions to the United Nations' 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development and the UN Sustainable Development Goals (SDG's) are described under the 2020-2023 Departmental Sustainable Development Strategy (DSDS).

CFIA's planned activities under its Core Responsibility "Safe food and healthy plants and animals" support Canada's efforts to address the UN 2030 Agenda and the Sustainable Development Goals, in particular the following:

To support the Zero Hunger Goal, CFIA, in cooperation with provincial governments and industry associations, sets policies and verify regulatory compliance aiming to prevent food contamination and hazards; to reduce the risks associated with diseases and toxic substances that may affect animals or that may be transmitted by animals to persons, and; to protect plant resources from threats, such as diseases, pests and invasive alien species. Some of those risks are climate-driven and as such, in support of Climate Action Goal, CFIA is assessing its institutional climate change risks, and identifying means by which climate-driven risks to its mandated activities could be managed.

By establishing and enforcing fertilizer and supplement registrations and safety standards, CFIA supports the Good health and well-being and, Clean Water and Sanitation Goals.

CFIA contributes to Life on Land Goal by minimizing the spread and introduction of invasive alien species that affect Canada's plant resources by promoting compliance and carrying out enforcement activities. CFIA is working to design, develop, and implement initiatives— with partners and stakeholders where feasible—, to limit the impact of invasive plants and plant pests on Canada's environmental resources, such as forests and agricultural lands.

Lastly, through outreach and awareness activities and campaigns, CFIA helps to reinforce the shared responsibility of managing invasive species in nature and supports the Responsible Consumption and Production Goal.

Federal tax expenditures

The Canadian Food Inspection Agency's Departmental Plan does not include information on tax expenditures that relate to its planned results for 2021 to 2022.

Tax expenditures are the responsibility of the Minister of Finance, and the Department of Finance Canada publishes cost estimates and projections for government‑wide tax expenditures each year in the Report on Federal Tax Expenditures. This report provides detailed information on tax expenditures, including objectives, historical background and references to related federal spending programs, as well as evaluations, research papers and gender-based analysis. The tax measures presented in this report are solely the responsibility of the Minister of Finance.

Organizational contact information

Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA)
1400 Merivale Road,
Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0Y9
Canada
Telephone: 1-800-442-2342 / 1-613-773-2342
Teletypewriter: 1-800-465-7735
Internet: Contact CFIA online

Appendix: definitions

appropriation (crédit)
Any authority of Parliament to pay money out of the Consolidated Revenue Fund.
budgetary expenditures (dépenses budgétaires)
Operating and capital expenditures; transfer payments to other levels of government, organizations or individuals; and payments to Crown corporations.
core responsibility (responsabilité essentielle)
An enduring function or role performed by a department. The intentions of the department with respect to a core responsibility are reflected in 1 or more related departmental results that the department seeks to contribute to or influence.
Departmental Plan (plan ministériel)
A report on the plans and expected performance of a department over a 3‑year period. Departmental Plans are tabled in Parliament each spring.
departmental priority (priorité ministérielle)
A plan or project that a department has chosen to focus and report on during the planning period. Departmental priorities represent the things that are most important or what must be done first to support the achievement of the desired departmental results.
departmental result (résultat ministériel)
A consequence or outcome that a department seeks to achieve. A departmental result is often outside departments' immediate control, but it should be influenced by program-level outcomes.
departmental result indicator (indicateur de résultat ministériel)
A factor or variable that provides a valid and reliable means to measure or describe progress on a departmental result.
departmental results framework (cadre ministériel des résultats)
A framework that consists of the department's core responsibilities, departmental results and departmental result indicators.
Departmental Results Report (rapport sur les résultats ministériels)
A report on a department's actual accomplishments against the plans, priorities and expected results set out in the corresponding Departmental Plan.
experimentation (expérimentation)
The conducting of activities that seek to first explore, then test and compare, the effects and impacts of policies and interventions in order to inform evidence-based decision-making, and improve outcomes for Canadians, by learning what works and what doesn't. Experimentation is related to, but distinct form innovation (the trying of new things), because it involves a rigorous comparison of results. For example, using a new website to communicate with Canadians can be an innovation; systematically testing the new website against existing outreach tools or an old website to see which one leads to more engagement, is experimentation.
full‑time equivalent (équivalent temps plein)
A measure of the extent to which an employee represents a full person‑year charge against a departmental budget. Full‑time equivalents are calculated as a ratio of assigned hours of work to scheduled hours of work. Scheduled hours of work are set out in collective agreements.
gender-based analysis plus (GBA+) (analyse comparative entre les sexes plus [ACS+])
An analytical process used to assess how diverse groups of women, men and gender-diverse people experience policies, programs and services based on multiple factors including race, ethnicity, religion, age, and mental or physical disability.
government-wide priorities (priorités pangouvernementales)
For the purpose of the 2021 to 2022 Departmental Plan, government-wide priorities refers to those high-level themes outlining the government's agenda in the 2020 Speech from the Throne, namely: Protecting Canadians from COVID-19; Helping Canadians through the pandemic; Building back better – a resiliency agenda for the middle class; The Canada we're fighting for.
horizontal initiative (initiative horizontale)
An initiative in which 2 or more federal organizations are given funding to pursue a shared outcome, often linked to a government priority.
non‑budgetary expenditures (dépenses non budgétaires)
Net outlays and receipts related to loans, investments and advances, which change the composition of the financial assets of the Government of Canada.
performance (rendement)
What an organization did with its resources to achieve its results, how well those results compare to what the organization intended to achieve, and how well lessons learned have been identified.
performance indicator (indicateur de rendement)
A qualitative or quantitative means of measuring an output or outcome, with the intention of gauging the performance of an organization, program, policy or initiative respecting expected results.
performance reporting (production de rapports sur le rendement)
The process of communicating evidence‑based performance information. Performance reporting supports decision-making, accountability and transparency.
plan (plan)
The articulation of strategic choices, which provides information on how an organization intends to achieve its priorities and associated results. Generally a plan will explain the logic behind the strategies chosen and tend to focus on actions that lead up to the expected result.
planned spending (dépenses prévues)

For Departmental Plans and Departmental Results Reports, planned spending refers to those amounts presented in the Main Estimates.

A department is expected to be aware of the authorities that it has sought and received. The determination of planned spending is a departmental responsibility, and departments must be able to defend the expenditure and accrual numbers presented in their Departmental Plans and Departmental Results Reports.

program (programme)
Individual or groups of services, activities or combinations thereof that are managed together within the department and focus on a specific set of outputs, outcomes or service levels.
program inventory (répertoire des programmes)
Identifies all of the department's programs and describes how resources are organized to contribute to the department's core responsibilities and results.
result (résultat)
An external consequence attributed, in part, to an organization, policy, program or initiative. Results are not within the control of a single organization, policy, program or initiative; instead they are within the area of the organization's influence.
statutory expenditures (dépenses législatives)
Expenditures that Parliament has approved through legislation other than appropriation acts. The legislation sets out the purpose of the expenditures and the terms and conditions under which they may be made.
strategic outcome (résultat stratégique)
A long-term and enduring benefit to Canadians that is linked to the organization's mandate, vision and core functions.
target (cible)
A measurable performance or success level that an organization, program or initiative plans to achieve within a specified time period. Targets can be either quantitative or qualitative.
voted expenditures (dépenses votées)
Expenditures that Parliament approves annually through an Appropriation Act. The vote wording becomes the governing conditions under which these expenditures may be made.
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