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2019 to 2020 Departmental Results Report

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2019 to 2020 Departmental Results Report

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Organization: Canadian Food Inspection Agency

ISBN: 2561-0775

The original version was signed by

The Honourable Patty Hajdu, PC, MP, Minister of Health

For the period ending March 31, 2020

Minister's message

Minister of Health

As the Minister of Health, I am pleased to present the Canadian Food Inspection Agency's (CFIA) 2019 to 2020 Departmental Results Report.

CFIA is a science-based regulatory agency, with employees working across Canada – in the National Capital Region (NCR) and in the Atlantic, Quebec, Ontario and Western regions.

CFIA is dedicated to safeguarding food, animal and plant health, which enhances the health and well-being of Canadians, the environment, and our economy.

CFIA develops and delivers inspection and other services to: prevent and manage food safety risks; protect plant resources from pests, diseases and invasive species; to prevent and manage animal and zoonotic diseases; contribute to consumer protection; and to contribute to market access for Canada's food, plants, and animals. CFIA bases its activities on science, effective management of risk, commitment to service and efficiency, and collaboration with domestic and international organizations that share its objectives.

The global food chain continues to change rapidly, requiring significant changes in production and distribution environments as a result of increased consumer demands for diverse, innovative choices as well as meaningful information about products. Technological and scientific advances are proceeding rapidly and regulators are challenged to keep pace with innovations in the marketplace. The Government of Canada introduced the Safe Food for Canadians Regulations, which CFIA enforces, to modernize Canada's food safety system by introducing more rigorous risk management practices and an increased focus on traceability. These new regulations serve to further safeguard Canada's food supply and enhance the health and well-being of consumers by simplifying and strengthening rules for food produced here or imported into the country.

With the implementation of these regulations, several businesses had to meet Safe Food for Canadians Regulations requirements as of January 15, 2019: meat, fish and seafood, dairy, eggs and processed egg products, processed fruits or vegetables, maple and honey. These sectors were previously registered or licensed by CFIA. Since some of the Safe Food for Canadians Regulations requirements were new to the fresh fruits and vegetables sector, businesses in the sector had extra time to comply.

Budget 2019 investments have enabled CFIA to combine efforts with Health Canada to prevent, detect and deter instances of food misrepresentation – or food fraud – by mitigating the risks that present health and safety risks. The Food Policy for Canada initiative advances a risk-informed approach to combat food fraud that serves to protect consumers, benefit businesses and further enhance Canada's reputation in a global marketplace.

CFIA has also been leading the Government of Canada's efforts to raise awareness about plant health alongside other federal departments and international partners during the United Nations-designated International Year of Plant Health 2020. Plant health is essential to both human and animal health, as well as to our environment and economy. CFIA works proactively with partners to prevent the introduction and spread of plant pests in Canada and globally.

As for animal health, CFIA continues to work diligently with domestic and international partners to keep animals safe from diseases of concern, such as African swine fever, and to prepare for this disease in the event it does cross our border. CFIA also continues to modernize regulations. Following many years of consultation, February 2020 saw the coming into force of the transportation of animals requirements under the Health of Animals Regulations to improve the well-being of animals during the entire transportation process.

To support market access and a strong and predictable trade environment for Canada, CFIA continues to pursue improved international standards, fairness in trade practices, enhanced use of technology by international partners and regulatory cooperation.

CFIA has also made significant contributions to Canada's COVID-19 pandemic response. As the Government of Canada led the work to address the unprecedented challenges posed by the COVID-19, CFIA worked diligently with partners and stakeholders at all levels, on both domestic and international stages, to assist in Canada's response to the pandemic as it developed. This agency has continued to perform the critical activities and deliver needed services to preserve the integrity of Canada's food safety system, so that Canadians have continued to have access to safe food during this difficult time.

I want to thank the CFIA employees, who continue to go above and beyond. To learn more about how CFIA serves Canadians, I invite you to read the 2019 to 2020 Departmental Results Report.

The Honourable Patty Hajdu, PC, MP
Minister of Health

Results at a glance and operating context

The Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) is a science-based regulatory agency that is responsible for safeguarding Canada's food supply, protecting Canada's plant and animal resource base from pests and diseases, and facilitating the international trade of food, plants, animals and related products. CFIA's work enhances the health and well-being of Canadians, the environment and our economy.

In 2019 to 2020, CFIA continued to build on important work done to respond to its current operating environment while preparing for the future. Key highlights include:

GBA+

CFIA is executing a multiyear (2018 to 2020) strategic action plan to ensure programs and policy initiatives use a GBA+ lens to better address the diverse needs of Canadians while supporting Gender Results Framework priorities such as equality, full participation in the economy and a harassment-free workplace. CFIA works in partnership with Health Canada and the Public Health Agency of Canada to support GBA+ assessments when mitigating human health risks associated with specific foods in specific populations such as children, elderly, and pregnant women.

Operating context

CFIA operates within a rapidly changing context as Canada is inextricably linked to a global economy and international influences. Risks to the food system and animal and plant resources have changed considerably in recent years and will continue to evolve rapidly. A growing population and diverse consumer preferences have led to an increasing volume and variety of products on the market. Global commerce has brought new business models and consolidation in the food and agricultural industry. Emerging and disruptive technology requires a regulatory system that promotes responsible adoption of such technology for public good without stifling innovation.

While these changes provide opportunities for Canadians, they bring operational challenges to CFIA. For instance, risks to food safety, animal and plant health have increased as a result of expanded international trade, accelerated technological innovation, and an increasingly complex and global supply chain of agricultural products. In addition, climate change is introducing potential risks, such as the possibility of pests and diseases becoming established in Canada where they would not have been able in the past.

Results: what we achieved

Core responsibility: safe food and healthy plants and animals

Description

CFIA is dedicated to safeguarding food, plants and animals, which enhances the health and well-being of Canadians, the environment and our economy.

Departmental result 1: Food sold in Canada is safe and accurately represented to Canadians

Description

Through the delivery of its programs, CFIA administers and enforces regulations that aim to mitigate risks to consumers associated with potential hazards in the food supply system and manages food safety emergencies and incidents by collaborating with federal and provincial food safety partners and industry. CFIA achieves its objectives through: assessing and managing risk; implementing and enforcing regulations; developing and applying new scientific tools and processes; embracing innovation and technology; adopting and promoting science-based international standards; and, cooperating with stakeholders, as appropriate.

Results achieved

Regulatory reform

In 2019 to 2020, CFIA completed a number of regulatory reforms to help ensure food sold in Canada is safe and accurately represented to Canadians:

Food Labelling Modernization

In December 2019, the Government of Canada published proposed regulatory changes to the Safe Food for Canadians Regulations and the Food and Drug Regulations in the Canada Gazette, Part I as part of CFIA's Food Labelling Modernization (FLM) initiative. The amendments will simplify and reduce the duplication of labelling requirements, reduce administrative burden on businesses while creating opportunities for innovation and increased trade and provide consumers with more information to guide their purchasing decisions. Due to the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on stakeholders and government, timelines for the FLM regulatory initiative will be delayed and will be reassessed as the pandemic resolves.

Establishment-based Risk Assessment Model for food

The Establishment-based Risk Assessment (ERA) model assesses the food safety risks of food establishments under CFIA's jurisdiction in order to prioritize inspection activities. Since March 2019, industry has been providing up-to-date information related to operational activities online through their individual MyCFIA accounts. This has allowed CFIA to have accurate and up-to-date risk information to support the ERA model. For example, in 2019 to 2020, results from the ERA model were used to target inspection resources based on risk in federally licensed maple and dairy establishments. In addition, industry has now access to an online training on the ERA model that covers the principles behind this risk assessment tool – an example of CFIA's ongoing commitment to transparency. Finally, CFIA also published a fourth scientific paper on the ERA model in a peer-reviewed journal.

Standard Inspection Procedure

The Standard Inspection Procedure (SIP) applies a consistent method of inspection of regulated parties across commodities. It was restructured in 2019 to 2020 for the 2020 to 2021 fiscal year. The updated SIP streamlines the procedures for our inspectors; and, aligns with the new Inspection Activity Architecture; the Digital Service Delivery Platform (DSDP); and the modular inspector training model under development. Together this will result in greater consistency for the regulated parties being inspected; and improve the quality of inspections.

Modernized Slaughter Inspection Program

CFIA has continued to modernize its slaughter inspection approach to move to more scientific risk-based approaches. The Modernized Slaughter Inspection Program (MSIP) focuses inspection efforts on the controls put in place by the licence holder to meet food safety and other standards. Instead of inspectors detecting and identifying defects, under MSIP, CFIA focuses its inspection activities on product which has been pre-screened by the establishment. This enhances CFIA's ability to oversee compliance with the production of safe meat products. Continued investment in meat slaughter inspection modernization in 2019 to 2020 led to the expansion of MSIP in additional hog-slaughter facilities.

Canadian Food Safety Information Network

Did you know

In 2019 to 2020, there were 127 public warnings issued by CFIA for high risk food recalls. CFIA's target for a recall is within 24 hours. On average, CFIA issued these warnings within nine hours of making the decision that a recall was required.

The Canadian Food Safety Information Network (CFSIN) is a CFIA-led initiative that will strengthen the ability of food safety authorities across Canada to better anticipate, detect and respond to food safety incidents and emergencies in a more coordinated way, and will better protect Canada's food supply. In 2019 to 2020, CFIA completed several data-sharing agreements enabling the establishment of Canada's first Pan-Canadian food safety database; and, developed tools such as lab mapping, environmental scanning, and event management in the CFSIN Platform that will better enable federal, provincial and territorial partners to anticipate, detect and respond to food safety issues.

Strategy for Salmonella reduction in poultry

To prevent reoccurrence of Salmonella outbreaks by consumption of frozen raw breaded chicken products, CFIA has put in place a policy requiring industry to implement new measures at the manufacturing/processing level to reduce Salmonella to below detectable levels in frozen raw breaded chicken products packaged for retail sale. Since implementation of these new measures in April 2019, there have been no reported outbreaks of human Salmonella illness linked to these products.

Food fraud

Food fraud deceives consumers, damages market fairness, and could also introduce health risks to Canadians. Budget 2019 introduced a Canada Food Policy and provided funds for CFIA, working with Health Canada, to enhance federal capacity to prevent, detect and deter instances of food fraud. In 2019 to 2020, CFIA inspected and tested certain foods known to be subject to fraud in order to identify food misrepresentation, and took enforcement action when violations were found. A report on surveillance activities for honey adulteration with foreign sugars such as corn syrup, rice syrup and cane sugar, was published as well as a notice to industry to raise awareness and improve compliance. In addition, CFIA collected information and data on food commodities at high-risk for fraud to plan future targeted inspection activities, and worked to enhance laboratory analytical capacity. CFIA engaged both domestically and internationally to promote compliance and increase outreach, including fostering partnerships with the Food Standards Agency and Food Standards Scotland of the United Kingdom to share best practices. A food fraud web page was launched on CFIA's website to build awareness.

Within this initiative, CFIA is also working to protect Canadians from fish species substitution. The Minister of Health's mandate letter introduced a commitment to develop a boat-to-plate traceability program for fish and seafood products in collaboration with Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada (AAFC) and the Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO). CFIA is working with industry and non-government organizations to address issues leading to fish misrepresentation and mislabelling, raise awareness throughout the supply chain and develop solutions to mitigate the risk of species misrepresentation.

Off-shore program activities

Increasing Canada's trading partners' ability to meet Canadian requirements in order to facilitate trade helps prevent unsafe imported food and food products from entering the Canadian marketplace. CFIAs off-shore food safety program is part of CFIA's broader pre-border risk management approach. In 2019 to 2020, CFIA conducted audits of foreign food safety systems to verify the implementation of food safety systems and to promote compliance with Canadian requirements in the production of safe food. CFIA also conducted foreign establishment verifications together with trading partners and foreign food safety authorities to promote compliance with Canadian requirements. Technical assistance activities, including a virtual workshop on undeclared allergens and a virtual workshop on chemical contaminants, were undertaken. Finally, CFIA notified foreign competent authorities of food safety non-compliance to promote compliance with Canadian requirements and prevent future non-compliance.

Departmental result 2: Plant and animal resources are protected from diseases and pests and are safe for Canadians and the environment

Description

Canadians expect the health and welfare of its animals, plants and forests to be safeguarded. To effectively and efficiently prevent and contain pests and diseases that affect plant and animal resource bases, CFIA must keep pace with a changing climate, and the rapid rate of technological advancements and scientific breakthroughs while maintaining reliable and relevant services.

Results achieved

Regulatory amendments

In 2019 to 2020, CFIA completed the following regulatory amendments:

The following regulatory amendments are progressing:

Due to the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on stakeholders and government, timelines for some CFIA regulatory initiatives were delayed. In accordance with instructions from the Treasury Board Secretariat, the timelines for the following regulatory proposals have been postponed:

Establishment-based Risk Assessment Models for hatcheries and feed

Did you know

The ERA Hatchery model received international recognition with two peer-reviewed scientific publications on the identification and selection of risk factors and quantification of assessment criteria.

Did you know

Canadians can use the newly created Equine Disease Dashboard to visualize real-time data on important equine diseases. Sharing this data helps create increased awareness for owners and veterinarians to put in place preventive measures. The dashboard supports CFIA's Open Government Initiative.

Building on the success of the establishment-based risk assessment (ERA) model in the food program area, the tool has been adapted for the animal program area. In 2019 to 2020, the ERA model was implemented for hatcheries. In addition, work on the livestock feed models for commercial and on-farm feed mills and rendering plants has been initiated. This information will help CFIA identify areas of higher risk and target inspection resources and activities.

Chronic Wasting Disease Program

The Chronic Wasting Disease (CWD) Program has been an active area of focus for the CFIA and the rest of the Health Portfolio. CWD belongs to the family of diseases known as transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs), or prion disease, and is a progressive and fatal nervous system disease that affects the brain, spinal cord, and many other tissues of farmed and free-ranging cervids such as the white-tailed deer, mule deer, moose, red deer, elk and reindeer. Given the detection of CWD in farmed and wild cervids in Canada (Alberta and Saskatchewan), the CFIA continued to implement program changes and worked with provincial and territorial partners, public health officials, the cervid industry, indigenous communities and international counterparts to strengthen knowledge of CWD and associated risks, its transmissibility and appropriate control measures, such as those that form the basis of Canada's Herd Certification Program. While CWD is not a World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE) listed disease, it remains a reportable disease under Canada's Health of Animals Act. Therefore, the CFIA continues to advance discussions with provincial/territorial and indigenous partners to set up agreements for a collaborative approach for the response to a first detection of CWD in farmed cervids in provinces or territories that have previously diagnosed it.

African swine fever

African swine fever (ASF) is a highly contagious and deadly viral disease affecting all pigs and pig herds with no approved vaccine to cure or prevent a transmission between infected animals (domestic or wild), from contaminated pork products, feed or fomites such as footwear, clothes, vehicles, knives, equipment. Outbreaks of the disease have been reported in Asia, Africa, parts of Europe, South America, and the Caribbean. CFIA continued to take unprecedented action to protect Canada's swine herd from ASF, including enhancing Canada's import controls by raising awareness among travellers through social media and additional signage at airports and by working closely with CBSA to strengthen border controls, for example increasing the number of detector dogs at Canadian airports and applying penalties to travelers who fail to declare pork when entering the country. Surveillance and diagnostics research activities, disease response plans as well as international engagement are being established. CFIA convened international experts for a three day Forum in Ottawa to develop strategies for a collaborative approach to the prevention and global management of ASF. CFIA has been working with federal, provincial and industry partners to develop a Pan-Canadian ASF Action Plan to enhance ASF prevention and preparedness efforts in order to maintain Canada's extensive export market for pigs, pork, and pork products.

Canadian Plant Health Council

Did you know

The United Nations has proclaimed 2020 International Year of Plant Health. As part of this event, CFIA is working with partners and stakeholders across the country and around the world to educate the public about the importance of plant health to food security, protection of the environment, and economic development and trade.

CFIA is one of three federal member departments of the Canadian Plant Health Council. In 2019 to 2020, the Canadian Plant Health Council continued to enhance the coordination of surveillance activities across the country; build producer awareness of the importance of biosecurity measures in preventing the spread of plant pests; and develop guidance on how partners can work together to respond quickly and effectively when emergency action is required. This collaboration is focused on preventive approaches to protect forests, crops and other plants from pests, diseases and other risks.

Citizen science engagement for early detection of plant pests

Public and citizen scientists' reports play an important role in plant pest surveillance. CFIA successfully led a collaborative, citizen-based monitoring project aiming at determining the status of the Cydalima perspectalis (Walker), box tree moth, an invasive pest originating from Asia that is currently causing severe damage to boxwood in Europe. In November 2018, CFIA confirmed the first report of this pest in North America, in an urban neighbourhood in Toronto, Ontario, which prompted CFIA to make informed regulatory decisions for the management of this pest.

Collaborative Japanese beetle eradication effort in Vancouver

The Japanese beetle, an invasive plant pest regulated by CFIA, was first detected in Vancouver in the summer of 2017. This insect can significantly damage landscape plants, ornamental plants, fruit and vegetable gardens, nurseries, orchards, golf courses, parks and agricultural crops. The important partnerships and collaborative response and eradication efforts led by CFIA with British Columbia's Ministry of Agriculture, the City of Vancouver, and other industry and non-governmental stakeholders, earned it the 2019 BC Premier Award.

Assessing current and emerging risks to plant health

Did you know

Canada is a key member in the Euphresco Network. Euphresco is a network of organisations that funds research projects and coordinates national research on plant health in Canada. Canada has been a participant since 2015, leading and participating in a number of important plant health research initiatives that focus on the development of new diagnostic methods for the detection of plant pests and a better understanding of their biology.

Safeguarding plant health is imperative to maintaining food security, environmental sustainability, and public health. CFIA developed a successful proposal for the Canadian Council of Academies to examine current and emerging risks to plant health, identify gaps and strengths in Canada's capacity to manage them, and identify leading risk management practices.

Departmental result 3: Canadian food, animals and plants and their associated products can be traded internationally

Description

CFIA supports government trade priorities and makes a difference for Canadians and Canadian businesses by opening and maintaining access to international markets, enabling the flow of safe food, plant and animal imports, and supporting the economy.

Results achieved

International standard setting

CFIA actively participates in developing international standards and trade rules for food safety, fair practices in food trade, and animal and plant health. In 2019 to 2020, CFIA's international standard setting achievements included:

International regulatory cooperation and collaboration

CFIA promotes a science-based and predictable trade environment by mitigating risks to Canada and strategically engaging and collaborating with foreign competent authorities. In 2019 to 2020, CFIA accomplishments included:

Market access support

Did you know

Canada has 14 free trade agreements (FTAs) with 51 countries around the world.

Approximately three quarters of Canada's agriculture and agri-food exports are destined for these countries.

CFIA's ongoing engagement with these countries promotes fair practices in the trade and Canada's science-based approach to protecting plants, animals and food. This contributes to improved market opportunities.

CFIA facilitates access of Canadian products to international markets by providing technical expertise and leading discussions and negotiations with foreign competent authorities on import/export requirements. In 2019 to 2020, accomplishments included:

Risk assessment

In 2019 to 2020, risk assessments were informed by rapid science advice in response to many new situations from new pest incursion and emerging pests and to market access requests. These risk assessments supported trade arrangements in pulses with India, laid the groundwork for a new British Columbia cherry export market to Korea, and helped open up new markets for canola and Canadian potatoes. CFIA also completed a country evaluation of Ukraine for the importation of honeybees and poultry meat. Strong, science-based assessments of countries allow for the safe trade of commodities and increases the confidence of Canadians in import controls.

Gender-based analysis plus (GBA+) and CFIA

Did you know

CFIA provided GBA+ training to over 500 managers and staff to strengthen the application of GBA+ and better consider the needs of our clients and impacts of our initiatives on diverse groups.

As a science and risk-based regulator, CFIA applies gender-based analysis plus (GBA+) at the outset of its activities. CFIA considers potential stakeholder needs and helps identify risks to potentially vulnerable populations to support decision making and the development of mitigating measures for its programs and services.

CFIA continued to execute its multiyear (2018-2020) strategic action plan to strengthen the implementation of GBA+ in its policies, programs, regulations and services. A GBA+ lens is applied to CFIA's initiatives to better address the diverse needs of Canadians and advance Government of Canada priorities for equity, diversity and inclusion. CFIA applies GBA+ to all Cabinet, regulatory and policy proposals and has instituted a means to track and measure the performance, quality and completeness of gender-based analysis in these areas for improved results.

This year, CFIA rolled out GBA+ training to most managers and senior staff. In addition, CFIA continued to improve the application and use of GBA+ in key functional areas.

Did you know

CFIA has a centralized tool to gather, track and report on its interactions with regulated parties and other stakeholders. Launched in 2018, CFIA's stakeholder engagement tool, known as "CICI", collects key information on stakeholder engagement to inform strategic priorities, program initiatives and gather essential GBA+ data in order to understand regulated party/stakeholder perspectives and impacts.

CFIA continues to benefit greatly from ongoing, close collaboration with both the Health and Agriculture portfolios, as well as the Department for Women and Gender Equality (WAGE). This past year, CFIA co-hosted and participated in many gender and diversity learning events such as the Health Portfolio's Sex and Gender Symposium and GBA+ Awareness Week activities to galvanize greater understanding of GBA+ and drive GBA+ implementation and best practices across government on gender equity, diversity and inclusion priorities. At the Symposium, CFIA shared its new CICI Stakeholder Engagement platform which collects critical engagement data on a number of diversity factors and shared the results of an internal survey to capture insights, observations and lessons learned on gender-based analyses.

Experimentation

Innovation and design

In 2019 to 2020, the following innovation and design initiatives were undertaken in support of CFIA's long-term vision:

Blockchain

Through pilot work conducted in 2019 to 2020, CFIA has learned that innovation in distributed ledger technology (blockchain) will be driven by individual firms or willing industry associations that want to move forward. Lessons learned during this experiment phase included the importance of regulators participating at the early stages of design and in the governance of blockchain-based industry systems to ensure regulatory requirements and interoperability are considered. Current areas of opportunity being pursued include collaborative work on the development of agricultural blockchain standards and data governance to support interoperability, the facilitation of international trade, and supply chain traceability.

Innovative Solutions Canada

In 2019 to 2020, CFIA posted a challenge encouraging small businesses in Canada to develop innovative ideas for the development of a predictive computer model that could support vaccine matching technologies for Foot and Mouth Disease. CFIA has also advanced the 3 challenges from 2018 to 2019 (2 on detecting plant pests and 1 on detecting marine biotoxins in shellfish) and selected two companies to enter Phase 1 of the program for detecting marine biotoxins in shellfish. In 2019 to 2020, CFIA matched with an innovation under the Innovative Solutions Canada (ISC) testing stream for the first time and will be testing an advanced diagnostic tool for African swine fever (ASF).

Inspired by the ISC challenge, CFIA invited staff to submit innovative ideas for an Experimentation Challenge that focused on leveraging digital technologies to improve the work of its staff. Three ideas were funded for further work and exploration:

Results achieved for Safe Food, Healthy Plants and Animals
Departmental results Performance indicators Target Date to achieve target 2017 to 2018 actual results 2018 to 2019 actual results 2019 to 2020 actual results
N1 Percentage of food businesses that comply with federal rules At least 95% March 2020 93.86% 98% 97%
N2 Percentage of Public Warnings for high risk food recalls that are issued within 24 hours of a recall decision At least 95% March 2020 93.9% 96.9% 89.8%Table Note 1
N3 Number of harmful foreign plant pests that have entered and established themselves in Canada Exactly 0 March 2020 0 0 3Table Note 2
N4 Percentage of domestic seed, fertilizer, and new or modified plant varieties and products that comply with Canadian regulations and international agreements At least 95% March 2020 90.7% 92.2% 92.3%Table Note 3
N5 Percentage of inspected loads of live animals that comply with federal humane transportation requirements At least 95% March 2020 98.9% 99% 99%
N6 Number of cases of animal diseases that affect human and/or animal health that have entered into Canada Exactly 0 March 2020 0 0 0
N7 Number of Shipments of Canadian goods that are rejected at foreign borders because they do not meeting import requirements

≤1%

(or ≤ 2198)

(prior year's number of rejections)

March 2020 N/A

1.21%

(or 2,198)

0.6%

(or 1,275)

Table Notes

Table Note 1

Of the 341 high risk recalls, 13 did not meet the standards; 6 of those 13 were related to 2 large simultaneous recall events. Confirming recall details to ensure public warning accuracy was the primary reason for the delays.

Return to table note 1  referrer

Table Note 2

Importers must ensure they comply with the Canadian regulations, while CFIA surveillance activities monitor the success of control measures on importer activities. Should regulated plant pests enter and become established in Canada, CFIA has controls in place to mitigate their risks.

Return to table note 2  referrer

Table Note 3

This indicator is a roll-up plant programs. Not all programs met their individual target. This lowered the overall result.

Return to table note 3  referrer

Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2019 to 2020 main estimates 2019 to 2020 planned spending 2019 to 2020 total authorities available for use 2019 to 2020 actual spending
(authorities used)
2019 to 2020 difference
(actual spending minus planned spending)
537,142,804 537,142,804 654,392,545 605,995,371 68,852,567
Human resources (full-time equivalents)
2019 to 2020 planned full-time equivalents 2019 to 2020 actual full-time equivalents 2019 to 2020 difference
(actual full-time equivalents minus planned full-time equivalents)
4,702 5,097 395

Financial, human resources and performance information for CFIA's Program Inventory is available in GC InfoBase.

Internal services

Description

Internal Services are those groups of related activities and resources that the federal government considers to be services in support of programs and/or required to meet corporate obligations of an organization. Internal Services refers to the activities and resources of the 10 distinct service categories that support Program delivery in the organization, regardless of the Internal Services delivery model in a department. The 10 service categories are:

Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2019 to 2020 main estimates 2019 to 2020 planned spending 2019 to 2020 total authorities available for use 2019 to 2020 actual spending
(authorities used)
2019 to 2020 difference
(actual spending minus planned spending)
138,368,594 138,368,594 165,280,069 146,271,373 7,902,779
Human resources (full-time equivalents)
2019 to 2020 planned full-time equivalents 2019 to 2020 actual full-time equivalents 2019 to 2020 difference
(actual full-time equivalents minus planned full-time equivalents)
940 959 19

CFIA transparency agenda: Protecting health and safety, preserving trust

Initiated in 2011, CFIA's transparency agenda has continued to evolve to meet growing public expectations for increased openness and transparency. Guided by the Open and Transparent Agency Policy and Framework (2019 to 2022) posted online in August 2019, CFIA's goal is to make its programs and services 'open by design'.

By providing more relevant, accurate and timely information, CFIA is enabling a better understanding of how and why CFIA's regulatory decisions are made, to help Canadians make informed decisions about matters of importance to them, their families, their communities and businesses.

To support the advancement of this agenda and the Government of Canada's priority of Open and Transparent Government, CFIA expanded its existing transparency practices in 2019 to 2020. Highlights include:

Information Management and Information Technology

CFIA is aligned with the Government of Canada's digital direction in implementing Data and Records Management strategies. To support these strategies, a fully functioning Information Governance structure has been put in place to enable better information quality and availability to Canadians through the Digital Service Delivery Platform and the Open Data Portal.

Along with the continued IT Client Care Centre services, CFIA began developing and releasing IT guidance documentation in mid-March, 2019 to support employees with remote access, telework and for the use of any new applications. "Tips and Tricks", knowledge articles, training materials (digital and video), FAQs and self-learning tools were, and continue to be, established and circulated to ensure the continued success of CFIA employees while working remotely. Additionally, to ensure business continued, CFIA digitized four of its internal forms and enabled digital signatures to allow for seamless approvals across the system. CFIA plans to continue assessing further opportunities for digitization in 2020 to 2021.

Corporate Management

Did you know

With the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic, CFIA worked closely with Shared Services Canada to ensure that CFIA's employees had the tools and capabilities required to continue their critical work in safeguarding Canada's food, animals and plants with plans to procure more mobile devices in 2020 to 2021.

CFIA continued to pursue digitization of all its financial and administrative transactions. In 2019 to 2020, CFIA implemented a fully digitized Invoice to Payment (I2P) portal to process all invoices online. This system has eliminated the requirement to route paper-based invoices by using digital images and electronic signatures for approval. Using innovative processes such as I2P successfully enabled CFIA to adapt quickly to the challenges imposed by COVID-19 and provide undisrupted services to support frontline service delivery and external reporting.

Human Resources

CFIA continued to pursue a number of initiatives in 2019 to 2020 that contributed to the following objectives:

Continued implementation of CFIA's healthy workplace strategy, working with our bargaining agents, to ensure that CFIA maintained a deliberate focus on the wellness and well-being of our employees, namely by:

CFIA also continued its efforts to:

Enhancing Project Management

CFIA continued to mature its project management capabilities through the development of portfolio and program management practices and standards. In 2019 to 2020, CFIA also provided an On-line Executive Project Management Training session to equip Project Leaders with an appropriate knowledge base and greater understanding of their role in successfully leading their portfolio of investments.

Analysis of trends in spending and human resources

Actual expenditures

The tables presented in this section reflect CFIA's historical spending levels from 2017-2018 to 2019-2020 and planned spending for the next three fiscal years (2020-2021 to 2022-2023). Planned spending excludes funding extensions that CFIA plans to pursue. Sunsetting programs are subject to government decisions to extend, reduce or enhance funding.

CFIA will assess initiatives that are sunsetting and seek renewal, as required, to maintain and continuously improve Canada's strong food safety system, safe and accessible food supply, and plant and animal resource base. Following parliamentary approval, funding renewal decisions will be reflected in CFIA's budgetary authorities. Agency-level information can be found in the Departmental spending trend graph below.

Departmental spending trend graph

The following graph presents planned (voted and statutory spending) over time.

Departmental spending trend graph. Description follows.
Description for image – Departmental spending trend graph
Departmental spending trend graph
2017-18 2018-19 2019-20 2020-21 2021-22 2022-23
Statutory 101 160 135 142 139 139
Voted 639 632 617 588 579 593
Total 739 792 752 730 718 732
Budgetary performance summary for core responsibilities and internal services
(dollars)
Core responsibilities and internal services 2019 to 2020 main estimates 2019 to 2020 planned spending 2020 to 2021 planned spending 2020 to 2021 planned spending 2019 to 2020 total authorities available for use 2019 to 2020 actual spending
(authorities used)
2018 to 2019 actual spending
(authorities used)
2017 to 2018 actual spending
(authorities used)
Safe food and healthy plants and animals 537,142,804 537,142,804 587,145,700 576,297,655 654,392,545 605,995,371 645,785,932 600,782,338
Subtotal 537,142,804 537,142,804 587,145,700 576,297,655 654,392,545 605,995,371 645,785,932 600,782,338
Internal Services 138,368,594 138,368,594 142,553,596 142,124,704 165,280,069 146,271,373 146,521,359 138,235,246
Total 675,511,398 675,511,398 729,699,296 718,422,359 819,672,614 752,266,744 792,307,291 739,017,584

Actual human resources

Human resources summary for core responsibilities and internal services
Core responsibilities and internal services 2017 to 2018 actual full-time equivalents 2018 to 2019 actual full-time equivalents 2019 to 2020 planned full-time equivalents 2019 to 2020 actual full-time equivalents 2020 to 2021 planned full-time equivalents 2020 to 2021 planned full-time equivalents
Safe food and healthy plants and animals 5,291 5,187 4,702 5,097 5,089 4,882
Subtotal 5,291 5,187 4,702 5,097 5,089 4,882
Internal Services 980 974 940 959 940 940
Total 6,271 6,161 5,642 6,056 6,029 5,822

CFIA saw decreased spending in 2019 to 2020, primarily relating to significant one-time retroactive salary settlement payments in 2018-19 due to the Collective Bargaining ratification that occurred that year.

In 2020 to 2021, 2021 to 2022, and 2022 to 2023 planned spending and FTEs decrease slightly compared to prior years mainly due to the sunsetting of funding for various initiatives such Daily Shift Inspection Presence and projects and the exclusion of anticipated in-year allocations from planned spending (such as annual reimbursements of personnel related payments made on behalf of the Government of Canada).

CFIA will continue to assess the initiatives that are sunsetting and seek renewal, as required, to maintain and continuously improve Canada's strong food safety system, safe and accessible food supply, and plant and animal resource base. When including anticipated renewal of sunsetting resources, agency spending and FTEs utilization is forecasted to be more stable.

An adjustment in the Total Authorities Available for Use, as they related to collective bargaining funds, occurred in 2019 to 2020. This adjustment resulted in the creation of a $29.6 million frozen allotment, which remains part of the CFIA's authorities but is not available for use by CFIA. When comparing the Total Authorities Available for Use to the Actual Expenditure Authorities Used for fiscal year 2019 to 2020, this frozen allotment should be considered to better compare and understand the reasonableness of the CFIA's variance.

Expenditures by vote

For information on CFIA's organizational voted and statutory expenditures, consult the Public Accounts of Canada 2019 to 2020.

Government of Canada spending and activities

Information on the alignment of CFIA's spending with the Government of Canada's spending and activities is available in GC InfoBase.

Financial statements and financial statements highlights

Financial statements

CFIA's financial statements (unaudited) for the year ended March 31, 2020, are available on the departmental website.

Financial statement highlights

The financial statements highlights presented within the Departmental Result Report are intended to serve as a general overview of CFIA's financial position and operations.

Financial statements are prepared in accordance with accrual accounting principles, Treasury Board accounting policies, and year-end instructions issued by the Office of the Comptroller General which are based on Canadian generally accepted accounting principles for the public sector, as required under Section 31 of the Canadian Food Inspection Agency Act. However, the financial information previously presented in the earlier portion of this Department Results Report was drawn from the Public Accounts of Canada which were prepared using an expenditure basis of accounting, also known as modified cash accounting.

Condensed statement of operations (unaudited) for the year ended March 31, 2020 (dollars)
Financial information 2019 to 2020
planned results
2019 to 2020
actual results
2018 to 2019
actual results
Difference (2019 to 2020 actual results minus 2019 to 2020 planned results) Difference (2019 to 2020 actual results minus 2018 to 2019 actual results)
Total expenses 853,080,000 839,390,000 835,244,000 (13,690,000) 4,146,000
Total revenues 53,161,000 56,229,000 56,671,000 3,068,000 (442,000)
Net cost of operations before government funding and transfers 799,919,000 783,161,000 778,573,000 (16,758,000) 3,704,000

CFIA's expenses for the fiscal year 2019 to 2020 were $839 million, an increase of $4.1 million compared to 2018-19. Items contributing to the increase are as follows:

These increases were offset by a $14 million decrease in professional fees largely due to a decrease in costs related to laboratory testing and legal services. Additionally, CFIA saw a $2.1 million decrease in travel costs. Travel costs were higher than normal in 2018 to 2019 as part of CFIA's BTB response. Travel restrictions due to COVID-19 further contributed to the decrease of travel costs.

2019 to 2020 total revenues were $56.2 million, similar to last year's $56.7 million.

Condensed statement of financial position (unaudited) as of March 31, 2020 (dollars)
Financial information 2019 to 2020 2018 to 2019 Difference
(2019 to 2020 minus 2018 to 2019)
Total net liabilities 169,750,000 178,747,000 (8,997,000)
Total net financial assets 107,036,000 109,013,000 (1,977,000)
Agency net debt 62,714,000 69,734,000 (7,020,000)
Total non-financial assets 185,373,000 200,030,000 (14,657,000)
Agency net financial position 122,659,000 130,296,000 (7,637,000)

The total liabilities at the end of 2019 to 2020 were $169.8 million, a decrease of $9 million over the previous year. The decrease was largely due to a $13.2 million decrease in accounts payable and accrued liabilities largely explained by the aforementioned renewal of collective agreements. The decreases were offset by a $6.4 million increase in vacation pay and compensatory leave liabilities due to the continued postponement of the automatic cash-out of vacation and compensatory leave at year-end.

2019 to 2020 total non-financial assets amounted to $185.4 million, a decrease of $14.7 million compared to 2018 to 2019. This was largely due to amortization of capital assets.

Additional information

Corporate information

Organizational profile

Appropriate minister: The Honourable Patty Hajdu, PC, MP

Institutional head: Siddika Mithani

Ministerial portfolio: Health

Enabling instruments:

Year of incorporation/commencement: 1997

Raison d'être, mandate and role: who we are and what we do

Raison d'être

The Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) is a large science-based regulatory Agency with employees working across Canada in the National Capital Region and in four operational regions: Atlantic, Québec, Ontario and Western Canada.

CFIA is dedicated to safeguarding food, and animal and plant health, which enhances Canada's environment, economy, and the health and well-being of its residents. Additionally, to support market access, CFIA works with Canada's trading partners to verify that Canadian products meet importing countries' technical requirements, thus expanding, gaining, restoring or maintaining access to markets.

Mandate and role

In fulfilling its role as a science-based regulatory agency, CFIA serves Canadians by developing policies and strategies, conducting specialized laboratory tests, and monitoring industry practice and compliance with legislation, in order to:

CFIA works with a variety of departments across all three levels of government, collaborates with stakeholders, and remains receptive to the values of interests groups. Together, all parties play a unique role in managing food, plant and animal risks, incidents and emergencies as they occur, and the implementation of appropriate measures and interventions where necessary.

For more information on the department's organizational mandate letter commitments, see the "Minister's mandate letter".

Reporting framework

CFIA's Departmental Results Framework and Program Inventory of record for 2019 to 2020 are shown below.

Reporting framework table. Description follows.
Description for image: Departmental Results Framework and Program Inventory

At the top of image, there is a table with four columns in a row.

The first column spans from the top to the bottom of the table with text rotated ninety degrees counter clockwise. The first column says:

  • Departmental Results Framework

The second column has multiple rows of boxes

The first box in the second column says:

  • Core Responsibility: Safe Food and healthy plants and animal

The second box in the second column says:

  • Departmental Result 1: Food sold in Canada is safe and accurately represented to Canadians

The third box in the second column says:

  • Departmental Result 2: Plant and animal resources are protected from diseases and pets and are safe for Canadians and the environment

The fourth box in the second column says:

  • Departmental Result 3: Canadian food, plants and animals and their associated products can be traded internationally

The third column has multiple rows that are aligned to the second box, third box, and the fourth box in the third column.

The first box in the third column is blank.

The second box in the third column is aligned to the "Departmental Result 1: Food sold in Canada is safe and accurately represented to Canadians" and it says:

  • Percentage of food businesses that comply with federal rules

The third box in the third column is aligned to the "Departmental Result 1: Food sold in Canada is safe and accurately represented to Canadians" and it says:

  • Percentage of Public Warnings for high risk food recalls that are issued within 24 hours of a recall decision

The fourth box in the third column is aligned to the "Departmental Result 2: Plant and animal resources are protected from diseases and pets and are safe for Canadians and the environment" and it says:

  • Number of harmful foreign pests that have entered and established themselves in Canada

The fifth box in the third column is aligned to the "Departmental Result 2: Plant and animal resources are protected from diseases and pets and are safe for Canadians and the environment" and it says:

  • Percentage of domestic seed, fertilizer, and new or modified plant varieties and products that comply with Canadian regulations and international agreements

The sixth box in the third column is aligned to the "Departmental Result 2: Plant and animal resources are protected from diseases and pets and are safe for Canadians and the environment" and it says:

  • Percentage of inspected loads of live animals that comply with federal humane transportation requirements

The seventh box in the third column is aligned to the "Departmental Result 2: Plant and animal resources are protected from diseases and pets and are safe for Canadians and the environment" and it says:

  • Number of cases of animal diseases that affect human and/or animal health that have entered into Canada

The eighth box in the third column is aligned to the "Departmental Result 3: Canadian food, plants and animals and their associated products can be traded internationally" and it says:

  • Number of shipments of Canadian goods that are rejected at foreign borders because they do not meet their import requirements

There is a blank row separating the first and second table.

The second table has two columns in a row.

The first column spans from the top to the bottom of the table with text rotated ninety degrees counter clockwise. The first column says:

  • Program Inventory

The second column has several rows.

The first row in the second column says:

  • Setting Rules for Food Safety and Consumer

The second row in the second column says:

  • Food Safety and Consumer Protection Compliance Promotion

The third row in the second column says:

  • Monitoring and Enforcement for Food Safety and Consumer Protection

The fourth row in the second column says:

  • Permissions for Food Products

The fifth row in the second column says:

  • Setting Rules for Plant Health

The sixth row in the second column says:

  • Plant Health Compliance Promotion

The seventh row in the second column says:

  • Monitoring and Enforcement for Plant Health

The eighth row in the second column says:

  • Permissions for Plant Products

The ninth row in the second column says:

  • Setting Rules for Animal Health

The tenth row in the second column says:

  • Animal Health Compliance Promotion

The eleventh row in the second column says:

  • Monitoring and Enforcement for Animal Health

The twelfth row in the second column says:

  • Permissions for Animal Products

The thirteenth row in the second column says:

  • International Standard Setting

The fourteenth row in the second column says:

  • International Regulatory Cooperation and Science Collaboration

The fifteenth row in the second column says:

  • International Market Access Support

Supporting information on the program inventory

Financial, human resources and performance information for CFIA's Program Inventory is available in GC InfoBase.

Supplementary information tables

Departmental Sustainable Development Strategy

1. Introduction to the Departmental Sustainable Development Strategy

The 2016 to 2019 Federal Sustainable Development Strategy (FSDS) presents the Government of Canada's sustainable development goals and targets, as required by the Federal Sustainable Development Act. The Canadian Food Inspection Agency adheres to the principles of the FSDS, and while not bound formally by the Act, supports reporting on the implementation of the Departmental Sustainable Development Strategy

2. Sustainable development in CFIA

CFIA's Departmental Sustainable Development Strategy for 2017 to 2020 describes the department's actions in support of achieving low-carbon government and sustainable food. This supplementary information table presents available results for the departmental action[s] pertinent to these goals. Previous years' supplementary information tables are posted on CFIA's website.

3. Departmental performance by FSDS goal

The following tables provide performance information on departmental action[s] in support of the FSDS goals listed in section 2.

FSDS goal: Low-Carbon Government
FSDS target(s) FSDS contributing action(s) Corresponding departmental action(s)

Starting point(s)

Performance indicator(s)

Target(s)

Results achieved
Reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from federal government buildings and fleets by 40% below 2005 levels by 2030, with an aspiration to achieve it by 2025

Modernize our fleet

Support the transition to a low-carbon economy through green procurement

  • report annually on GHG emissions from fleet sources
  • develop and leverage a long term Fleet Management Strategy, which will include ways to reduce GHG through reduction in idling and purchasing of green vehicles where and when feasible among other activities
  • include environmental considerations in procurement instruments
  • fulfill the requirements of the Policy on Green Procurement related to training, employee performance evaluations, procurement management processes and controls and using common use procurement instruments

Starting point:

  • GHG emissions from fleet in fiscal year 2005 to 2006 (base year): = 6.43 ktCO2e

Target(s)/performance indicator(s):

  • GHG emissions from fleet in fiscal year 2029-30 = 3.86 ktCO2e
  • Percentage (%) change in GHG emissions from fleet from fiscal year 2005-06 to fiscal year 2029 to 2030 = 40%
  • CFIA will continue to take action to embed environmental considerations into procurement, in accordance with the Federal Policy on Green Procurement
  • CFIA will continue to ensure that 100% of procurement and material management specialists complete the Canada School of Public Service Green Procurement course
  • CFIA will continue to ensure that 100% of identified managers and functional heads of procurement and material have performance evaluations that clearly include support and contribution toward green procurement
  • GHG emissions from fleet in fiscal year 2019 to 2020 = 3.62 ktCO2e
  • Percentage (%) change in GHG Emissions from fleet from fiscal year 2005 to 2006 to fiscal year 2018 to 2019 = 44%
  • CFIA awarded 86 contracts with a total value of $6,197,906 to purchase environmentally friendly products from certified green suppliers
  • 100% of CFIA procurement and material management specialists have completed the CSPS Green Procurement Course
  • 100% of CFIA managers and functional heads of procurement have performance evaluations supporting green procurement
FSDS goal: Sustainable food
FSDS target(s) FSDS contributing action(s) Corresponding departmental action(s)

Starting point(s)

Performance indicator(s)

Target(s)

Results achieved
Ensure safe and accessible food supply by mitigating risks to animal and plant resources from pests, diseases and other health hazards and prevent risks to health of Canadians Work with partners to address invasive alien species
  • Participate in international fora such as the International Plant Protection Convention and the North American Plant Protection Organization
  • Contribute to the development of international phytosanitary standards
  • Foster partnerships with provincial invasive species councils and agricultural, forestry, and horticultural stakeholders
  • Work with the United States to collect data on the inspection of vessels for Asian gypsy moth conducted by other countries at origin and upon arrival in North America to determine compliance rates

Starting point:

  • Not applicable

Target(s)/performance indicator(s):

  • Percentage of North American Plant Protection Organization (NAPPO), International Plant Protection Convention and Quadrilateral Groups projects with CFIA plant health experts
  • Number of new and revised regional and international standards for plant health
  • Number of new partnership initiatives (consultation, outreach, research, info sharing, alternative service delivery, etc.)
  • 55% of North American Plant Protection Organization (NAPPO), International Plant Protection Convention and Quadrilateral Groups projects with CFIA plant health experts
  • 25 new and revised regional and international standards for plant health
  • 17 new partnership initiatives
FSDS goal: Sustainably managed lands and forests
FSDS target(s) FSDS contributing action(s) Corresponding departmental action(s) Contribution by each departmental action to the FSDS goal and target

Starting point(s)

Performance indicator(s)

Target(s)

Results achieved
By 2020, at least 17% of terrestrial areas and inland water are conserved through networks of protected areas and other effective area-based conservation measures Use legislation and regulations to manage the spread of invasive alien species
  • Perform activities to promote and verify compliance with import and domestic phytosanitary requirements including cargo and facility inspections and audits of alternative service delivery programs
  • Develop and implement regulatory options for new invasive plants, plant pests, and pathways
  • Consult Canadians on regulatory options for new invasive plants, plant pests, and pathways
  • CFIA minimizes the spread and introduction of invasive alien species by promoting compliance and carrying out enforcement activities. CFIA is working to design, develop, and implement initiatives to limit the introduction and spread of invasive alien plants and pests to Canada's environmental resources, such as forests and agricultural lands

Starting point:

  • Not applicable

Target(s)/performance indicator(s):

  • Number of new plant pests and invasive plants introduced in Canada
  • 3 new plant pests/invasive plants were introduced in Canada
4. Report on integrating sustainable development

During the 2019 to 2020 reporting cycle, CFIA had no proposals that required a strategic environmental assessment (SEA) and no public statements were produced.

Details on transfer payment programs of $5 million or more

General information
Name of transfer payment program Compensation payments in accordance with requirements established by Regulations under the Health of Animals Act and the Plant Protection Act, and authorized pursuant to the Canadian Food Inspection Agency Act (S.C., 1997, c.6)
Start date 1997 to 1998
End date Ongoing
Type of transfer payment Compensation payment
Type of appropriation Statutory authority under the Health of Animals Act and the Plant Protection Act
Fiscal year for terms and conditions 1997 to 1998
Link to the department's Program Inventory

Monitoring and Enforcement for Plant Health

Monitoring and Monitoring and Enforcement for Animal Health

Description These payments are to compensate Canadians, in accordance with the appropriate regulations, for plants or animals ordered destroyed for the purpose of disease control.
Results achieved In 2019 to 2020, one (1) Canadian was compensated for plants ordered destroyed and 72 Canadians were compensated for animals ordered destroyed.
Findings of audits completed in 2019 to 2020 N/A
Findings of evaluations completed in 2019 to 2020

Evaluation completed in 2019 to 2020

Key Findings for the Terrestrial Animal Health Program:

  • proactive processes support the CFIA mandate to mitigate risks related to Canada's animal resource base, with opportunities for improvement in surveillance and data integration
  • reactive processes support the CFIA mandate to mitigate risks related to Canada's animal resource base, with opportunities for improvement in the description of roles and responsibilities related to new and emerging diseases and the management of the compensation
Engagement of applicants and recipients in 2019 to 2020 N/A
Financial information (dollars)
Type of transfer payment 2017 to 2018 actual spending 2018 to 2019 actual spending 2019 to 2020 planned spending 2019 to 2020 total authorities available for use 2019 to 2020 actual spending (authorities used) Variance (2019 to 2020 actual minus 2019 to 2020 planned)
Total grants N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A
Total contributions N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A
Total other types of transfer payments 6,372,561 4,172,539 12,500,000 6,465,506 6,465,506 (6,034,494)
Total program 6,372,561 4,172,539 12,500,000 6,465,506 6,465,506 (6,034,494)
Explanation of variances

Compensation payments vary from year to year, depending upon the various outbreaks which occur across Canada. The planned spending for Compensation payments is hard to forecast because the occurrence of the diseases are unpredictable.

Gender-based analysis plus

General information
Institutional GBA+ capacity

CFIA's Gender-based analysis plus (GBA+) strategic action plan uses the six key elements outlined by Women and Gender Equality Canada (WAGE) for the successful integration of a Gender-based analysis plus Framework. These elements support the systematic use of GBA+ across CFIA, and provide a foundation for staff to develop competencies and apply GBA+ to their work and inform decision-making processes.

As signatory to the Health Portfolio's Sex and Gender-Based Analysis Policy, CFIA ensures all research, legislation, policies, programs and services apply GBA+ as part of a framework which also includes:

Highlights of GBA+ Results at CFIA

A GBA+ Champion: CFIA's Vice-President of Policy and Programs Branch (PPB) provides an essential role in leading and coordinating awareness raising and capacity building efforts, including the promotion, implementation and reporting on GBA+ in policies, programs and legislation.

GBA+ Responsibility Centre: with the GBA+ Focal Point in the Program Policy Integration Division of PPB, the responsibility centre liaises with other departments and agencies and leads the integration, promotion, monitoring and reporting of GBA+ activities, and ensures quality and consistency of GBA+ in policy, programs, legislation and other functional areas.

GBA+ Templates: CFIA developed a GBA+ Template in concert with the Health Portfolio and the Department of Finance Departmental Results Summary,  to guide a deeper, mandatory analysis of impacts on diverse population groups and ensure mitigation, performance, and monitoring strategies are imbedded in all regulatory, budget and Cabinet-related proposals.

GBA+ Guidance: The GBA+ Responsibility Centre uses CFIA's strategic action plan; government priorities from WAGE and the central agencies; the experience and insights of Health and Agriculture portfolios; and expertise from Human Resources, Cabinet Affairs and other Branches to generate guidance and informed work planning to ensure a "complete" GBA+ is done at the outset of agency activities for inclusivity and to best address diverse stakeholder needs.

Mandatory Training: Completion of WAGE's Introduction to GBA+ online course is required for all policy, regulatory and program leads responsible for developing Memoranda to Cabinet, Treasury Board submissions, legislative and budget proposals. In addition, CFIA offers its staff opportunities for on-going participation in dedicated GBA+ and complementary themed (for example, unconscious bias and data) training from the Canada School of the Public Service and others, as well as symposiums, conferences, forums and awareness week events to enhance skills and expertise.

Availability of sex- and gender-disaggregated data: CFIA continues to work closely with both Health and Agriculture Portfolios to enhance its data and knowledge base through research and statistical evidence, categorized by intersecting diversity factors, which enables subject matter experts to perform in-depth analysis, and consider specific case studies to better apply GBA+ in their work.

CFIA's strategic GBA+ action plan, launched in 2018, and updated with annual work planning, a performance measurement suite, best practices and lessons learned, provides a comprehensive set of actions to integrate GBA+ more fully in agency activities. In 2019 to 2020 CFIA advanced GBA+ implementation by:

  • Incorporating GBA+ into policy and program development; legislation; international agreements; research; communications; evaluation; management and other areas
  • Increasing GBA+ awareness with basic and advanced handouts, custom-designed for GBA+ Awareness Week and forming the basis of a new basic and advanced practitioner's toolkit
  • Improving GBA+ knowledge and skills with a phased, roll-out of required, Introduction to GBA+ online training, hands-on training, tools, and other events and activities promoting the use of GBA+; and
  • Continuing to strengthen partnerships and networks within CFIA and with others in the Health and Agriculture Portfolios, Central Agencies, the Canada School of Public Service and WAGE

CFIA continues to monitor, review and update guides and tools as needed, to fully support staff in applying GBA+. To ensure the comprehensiveness of Cabinet, Budget and other initiatives, all GBA+ content is reviewed by CFIA's GBA+ Responsibility Centre, which tracks, monitors and reports on performance, as well as lessons learned and best practices in applying quality GBA+ to support evidence-based decision-making.

Report on 2019 to 2020 Planned Initiatives

CFIA's annual GBA+ work planning aligns with WAGE, the Health and Agriculture Portfolios, and Central Agencies, and is consistent with Government of Canada goals for GBA+ implementation to achieve greater equity, diversity and inclusion.

In addition to continuing to monitor the application of GBA+ in all Cabinet documents, Budget proposals, regulations and policies, CFIA tracks GBA+ quality, consistency and performance in a variety of key areas to support GBA+ implementation early on in the development process.

With dedicated training, and a strengthened challenge function for CFIA's new GBA+ template introduced for all Cabinet, regulatory and policy proposals, a "complete" GBA+ was prepared at the outset of every initiative. Proposal leads continued to expand their stakeholder knowledge base by exploring gender and diversity data from both an internal and external perspective. CFIA also introduced a data gathering and reporting mechanism for all agency engagement with client and stakeholders to collect essential GBA+ data.

CFIA partners with experts in the Health and Agriculture portfolios and regularly liaises with the Canada School of Public Service, WAGE, Statistics Canada, other federal departments and organizations outside the public service to enhance the range, availability and quality of gender-disaggregated data available to undertake GBA+. With other government departments, CFIA continues to advance gender and equity priorities by sharing best practices, tools, data and analysis, such as CFIA's GBA+ post-mortem with WAGE for Budget 2020 proposals. In addition, CFIA worked closely with TBS and Finance to help establish government-wide policy direction and guidance for gender inclusive services and data collection protocols for business-facing departments. CFIA also honed its expert advice and application of GBA+ by working closely with the Canada Border Services agency on the issue of African Swine Flu; Global Affairs Canada for the Canadian US Mexico trade agreement; and with the Canada Revenue agency to adopt a more equitable, client-focussed approach as a science-based regulator that supports small businesses, indigenous communities and other diverse groups.

CFIA conducted its second phase of agency-wide engagement and presentations to senior management to underscore the importance of GBA+, raise awareness and build capacity. Leading by example, Branch management then completed the Introduction to GBA+ online training, helping to roll out the required training to their staff, including all managers, analysts, and officers in most Branches. This effort has improved GBA+ knowledge and strengthened coordination, alignment and the integration of GBA+ in key functional areas of CFIA such as Science, Evaluations, HR Diversity and Equity, and HR Learning. Expert GBA+ practitioners working on key GBA+ initiatives received the GBA+ Premium training provided by the Canada School of Public Service. CFIA collaborated with the Health and Agriculture Portfolios, WAGE and other federal government organizations to conduct surveys, share best practices and lessons learned to improve GBA+ learning and training.

Work on the new GBA+ Advisors Network progressed with a new terms of reference and initial Branch agreement on creating a network of experts to help coordinate GBA+ activities and foster greater equity and diversity analytical skills as a core competency in programs, policies, service and engagement. Final membership and formalization of the Network will be finalized in mid-2020.

Also, CFIA formally integrated GBA+ into its national diversity activities, strengthening strategic direction and coordination through the auspices of the Equity and Diversity Steering Committee.

Horizontal initiatives

CFIA had no horizontal initiatives in 2019 to 2020.

Response to parliamentary committees and external audits

Response to parliamentary committees

There were no parliamentary committee reports requiring a response in 2019 to 2020.

Response to audits conducted by the Office of the Auditor General of Canada (including audits conducted by the Commissioner of the Environment and Sustainable Development)

There were no audits in 2019 to 2020 requiring a response.

Response to audits conducted by the Public Service Commission of Canada or the Office of the Commissioner of Official Languages

There were no audits in 2019 to 2020 requiring a response.

Status report on transformational and major Crown projects

CFIA had no transformation or major Crown projects in 2019 to 2020.

Up-front multi-year funding

CFIA has no agreements for this directive.

Federal tax expenditures

The tax system can be used to achieve public policy objectives through the application of special measures such as low tax rates, exemptions, deductions, deferrals and credits. The Department of Finance Canada publishes cost estimates and projections for these measures each year in the Report on Federal Tax Expenditures. This report also provides detailed background information on tax expenditures, including descriptions, objectives, historical information and references to related federal spending programs. The tax measures presented in this report are the responsibility of the Minister of Finance.

Organizational contact information

Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA)
1400 Merivale Road,
Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0Y9
Canada
Telephone: 1-800-442-2342 / 1-613-773-2342
Teletypewriter: 1-800-465-7735
Internet: Contact CFIA online

Appendix: definitions

appropriation (crédit)
Any authority of Parliament to pay money out of the Consolidated Revenue Fund.
budgetary expenditures (dépenses budgétaires)
Operating and capital expenditures; transfer payments to other levels of government, organizations or individuals; and payments to Crown corporations.
core responsibility (responsabilité essentielle)
An enduring function or role performed by a department. The intentions of the department with respect to a core responsibility are reflected in one or more related departmental results that the department seeks to contribute to or influence.
Departmental Plan (plan ministériel)
A report on the plans and expected performance of an appropriated department over a 3‑year period. Departmental Plans are usually tabled in Parliament each spring.
departmental priority (priorité)
A plan or project that a department has chosen to focus and report on during the planning period. Priorities represent the things that are most important or what must be done first to support the achievement of the desired departmental results.
departmental result (résultat ministériel)
A consequence or outcome that a department seeks to achieve. A departmental result is often outside departments' immediate control, but it should be influenced by program-level outcomes.
departmental result indicator (indicateur de résultat ministériel)
A quantitative measure of progress on a departmental result.
departmental results framework (cadre ministériel des résultats)
A framework that connects the department's core responsibilities to its departmental results and departmental result indicators.
Departmental Results Report (rapport sur les résultats ministériels)
A report on a department's actual accomplishments against the plans, priorities and expected results set out in the corresponding Departmental Plan.
experimentation (expérimentation)
The conducting of activities that seek to first explore, then test and compare the effects and impacts of policies and interventions in order to inform evidence-based decision-making, and improve outcomes for Canadians, by learning what works, for whom and in what circumstances. Experimentation is related to, but distinct from, innovation (the trying of new things), because it involves a rigorous comparison of results. For example, using a new website to communicate with Canadians can be an innovation; systematically testing the new website against existing outreach tools or an old website to see which one leads to more engagement, is experimentation.
full‑time equivalent (équivalent temps plein)
A measure of the extent to which an employee represents a full person‑year charge against a departmental budget. For a particular position, the full‑time equivalent figure is the ratio of number of hours the person actually works divided by the standard number of hours set out in the person's collective agreement.
gender-based analysis plus (GBA+) (analyse comparative entre les sexes plus [ACS+])
An analytical process used to assess how diverse groups of women, men and gender-diverse people experience policies, programs and services based on multiple factors including race ethnicity, religion, age, and mental or physical disability.
government-wide priorities (priorités pangouvernementales)
For the purpose of the 2019 to 2020 Departmental Results Report, those high-level themes outlining the government's agenda in the 2019 Speech from the Throne, namely: Fighting climate change; Strengthening the Middle Class; Walking the road of reconciliation; Keeping Canadians safe and healthy; and Positioning Canada for success in an uncertain world.
horizontal initiative (initiative horizontale)
An initiative where two or more federal organizations are given funding to pursue a shared outcome, often linked to a government priority.
non‑budgetary expenditures (dépenses non budgétaires)
Net outlays and receipts related to loans, investments and advances, which change the composition of the financial assets of the Government of Canada.
performance (rendement)
What an organization did with its resources to achieve its results, how well those results compare to what the organization intended to achieve, and how well lessons learned have been identified.
performance indicator (indicateur de rendement)
A qualitative or quantitative means of measuring an output or outcome, with the intention of gauging the performance of an organization, program, policy or initiative respecting expected results.
performance reporting (production de rapports sur le rendement)
The process of communicating evidence‑based performance information. Performance reporting supports decision making, accountability and transparency.
plan (plan)
The articulation of strategic choices, which provides information on how an organization intends to achieve its priorities and associated results. Generally, a plan will explain the logic behind the strategies chosen and tend to focus on actions that lead to the expected result.
planned spending (dépenses prévues)

For Departmental Plans and Departmental Results Reports, planned spending refers to those amounts presented in Main Estimates.

A department is expected to be aware of the authorities that it has sought and received. The determination of planned spending is a departmental responsibility, and departments must be able to defend the expenditure and accrual numbers presented in their Departmental Plans and Departmental Results Reports.

program (programme)
Individual or groups of services, activities or combinations thereof that are managed together within the department and focus on a specific set of outputs, outcomes or service levels.
program inventory (répertoire des programmes)
Identifies all the department's programs and describes how resources are organized to contribute to the department's core responsibilities and results.
result (résultat)
A consequence attributed, in part, to an organization, policy, program or initiative. Results are not within the control of a single organization, policy, program or initiative; instead they are within the area of the organization's influence.
statutory expenditures (dépenses législatives)
Expenditures that Parliament has approved through legislation other than appropriation acts. The legislation sets out the purpose of the expenditures and the terms and conditions under which they may be made.
target (cible)
A measurable performance or success level that an organization, program or initiative plans to achieve within a specified time period. Targets can be either quantitative or qualitative.
voted expenditures (dépenses votées)
Expenditures that Parliament approves annually through an appropriation act. The vote wording becomes the governing conditions under which these expenditures may be made.
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