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2016-2017 Departmental Results Report
Results: what we achieved

Programs

Food Safety Program

Description

The Food Safety Program aims to mitigate risks to public health associated with diseases and other health hazards in the food supply system and to manage food safety emergencies and incidents. The program achieves its objectives by promoting food safety awareness through public engagement and verification of compliance by industry with standards and science-based regulations. The program delivers initiatives to verify that consumers receive food safety and nutrition information and to mitigate unfair market practices targeting consumers and industry. Collaboration with other governments and stakeholders further enhances the Agency's ability to track, detect and mitigate risks associated with food and the food supply system, including food-borne illness. This program supports public health and instils confidence in Canada's food system.

Food Safety Program. Description follows.
Description for image: Food Safety Program

At the top of the image there are three boxes/shapes in a row.

The first box says:

  • Program

The second box says:

  • Expected Results

The third box says:

  • Government of Canada (GoC) Outcome Area

Under this row, there is a second row with an additional three boxes.

The first box is placed directly under the Program box. It says:

  • Food Safety Program

There is an arrow from this box, pointing to the second box, which is directly below the "Expected Results" box.

It says:

  • Risks to the Canadian public associated with the food supply system are mitigated
  • Domestic and imported food products are compliant with Canadian regulations and international agreements

There is an arrow from this box, pointing to the third box, which is directly below the "Government of Canada (GoC) Outcome Area" box, that says:

  • Healthy Canadians

The last row has one box which identifies the Key Risk Areas. It says:

  • Inspection Effectiveness
  • Scientific Capability
  • Legislative, Regulatory and Program Framework
  • Transparency and Leveraging Partnerships

Results

Regulatory Modernization to Enhance Safety and Efficiency

While the Safe Food for Canadians Act received Royal Assent in 2012, new regulations are needed for the Act to come in to force. The CFIA achieved a key milestone on January 2017, when the proposed Safe Food for Canadians Regulations were published in Canada Gazette, Part I Footnote 1. This was followed by a 90-day public comment period, during which the public provided feedback on the proposed regulations. During the same period, the CFIA showcased innovative digital tools at engagement sessions and on its website to help businesses and consumers understand the proposed regulations. The tools included interactive decision-making tools, guides, templates, videos, infographics and multilingual fact sheets. At these sessions, CFIA experts answered participants' questions related to the proposed Safe Food for Canadians Regulations and reinforced the Agency's commitment to service excellence and to ensuring industry readiness for the new regulations.

The Safe Food for Canadians Act will provide Canadians with better protection from unsafe food through the introduction of stronger authorities to prevent tampering, implementation of updated food safety control systems that align with internationally recognized standards, enhancement of controls over imported food commodities and improvement of recall systems.

To help stakeholders understand the Safe Food for Canadians Regulations and to promote early adoption of best practices in food safety, the CFIA released plain language guidance materials and templates. To further facilitate industry's readiness for the coming into force of the regulations, models systems and additional interpretive guidance materials are being developed and will be released leading up to the final publication of the regulations in Canada Gazette, Part II Footnote 1 in 2018.

Canadian Food Safety Information Network

The development of the Canadian Food Safety Information Network continues to advance by engaging federal/provincial/territorial partners. Since the project launch in November 2014, progress has been made in a number of areas that are critical to the success of the initiative, such as:

  • Developing memoranda of understanding with provincial and territorial food safety authorities for sharing food safety data;
  • Collecting and validating provincial/territorial business requirements for the network; and
  • Conducting pilots to engage partners to ensure their needs are met and risks and challenges are identified early. This year's progress has placed the CFIA in a stronger position to anticipate, detect, and respond to foodborne threats and hazards.

When fully implemented in 2018-19, the Canadian Food Safety Information Network will benefit Canadians by bringing together surveillance, monitoring, analysis and surge capacity, and capabilities across the full extent of the food supply chain. These efforts will allow near-real-time sharing, collecting and analysis of food safety data and enabling the generation of pan-Canadian performance evidence to demonstrate food safety system effectiveness to trading partners.

The Food Labelling Modernization Initiative

During 2016-17, the CFIA engaged stakeholders on proposals to modernize food labelling regulations. These proposals were based on issues and options identified by stakeholders in earlier phases of engagement, taking into consideration food labelling changes proposed by Health Canada and in international standards and practices. Over 2,500 stakeholders participated in consultations. The proposals for modernizing food labelling will update regulations in areas such as date marking, information on company contact, and legibility. The regulations will also use incorporation by reference for items such as food standards and class names.

The proposals included a new approach for managing truthful and not misleading food labelling that is based on risk. Implementation of the proposals, beginning in 2017-18, will enable better-informed purchasing decisions by Canadians, while supporting the food industry's ability to innovate and to gain market access.

Assessing Risks in Food Establishments

The Establishment-based Risk Assessment model is an applied mathematical algorithm that assesses the food safety risks associated with establishments under CFIA jurisdiction. The model generates results based on the level of food safety risks they represent to consumers. The development of the model was completed for all food commodities in 2016-17. The model was tested and validated in the dairy and meat/poultry commodities. Building on that success, national data collection was launched for dairy and meat and poultry registered establishments. A pilot was conducted in the fish and seafood commodity and its results are currently being validated. National data collection from fish and seafood establishments is ongoing. The results from the model will be used to guide and support risk-based integrated planning and decision making at the CFIA.

Food Safety Oversight Initiative

The food safety oversight initiative is intended to enhance surveillance through focusing resources on inspection and testing/analysis that supports controls for fresh fruits and vegetables, fish and seafood, and imported and manufactured foods. Updates to program design and direction to staff have improved the CFIA's ability to monitor, inspect and proactively manage risks, thus improving consumer protection. With respect to foreign countries, CFIA has built internal capacity and developed tools, which have resulted in assessments of fresh fruits and vegetables controls in two priority countries. These assessments and continued engagement with additional foreign authorities improve CFIA's management of these sectors.

Implementing Electronic Service Delivery

The CFIA's "digital first" initiative maximizes the use of new technologies to improve networking, enhance access to data and boost client services. It is about enabling paperless data exchange. As part of this initiative, the electronic service delivery platform supports Agency modernization by providing a set of technologies and tools for citizens, industry, international trading partners, and CFIA inspectors to support their respective roles and facilitate regular business transactions.

As scheduled under the electronic service delivery platform project, the "My CFIA" portal went live in January 2017. The platform provides industry with a secure, innovative suite of online services conveniently accessible anywhere, anytime. The first release enabled clients in Canada's domestic dairy sector to apply or renew their establishment registration online. The CFIA has continued to work to extend applying online for other permissions (permits, licenses) to other sectors; it will also be possible to request certain export certificates online.

For more information on "My CFIA," please visit the "My CFIA" webpage.

In June 2016, the CFIA launched a new service called "Ask CFIA" in response to stakeholders need for direct access to consistent and easy to understand information and the desire for access to technical expertise in the Agency. "Ask CFIA" provides regulated parties with one point of contact to ask questions to help them understand and comply with CFIA-regulatory requirements. Increased regulatory understanding and compliance will provide Canadians with a stronger food safety system and better protection for plant and animal health. "Ask CFIA" was initially made available to the following sectors: dairy, fish and seafood, fresh fruits and vegetables, maple products, honey and egg and egg products. Additional sectors will be phased in until all CFIA regulated sectors are included. The Agency will continue to test and refine its internal processes and plans to evaluate the performance of the "Ask CFIA" service. $1.3 million was assigned to the initiative.

Did you know …?

The "Ask CFIA" team received an honourable mention for the Canadian Federation of Independent Business's Golden Scissors Award for individuals or groups who have successfully motivated or demonstrated leadership and courage, and produced meaningful and positive results in cutting red tape for small business.

For more information on "Ask CFIA", please visit the "Ask CFIA" webpage.

Proactive Offshore Preventative Activities

To help trading partners comply with Canada's import food regulations, the CFIA is increasing its proactive offshore preventative activities. In this approach, compliance is verified at exporting countries' establishments by assessing manufacturing practices and/or inspection systems. This is a shift from verifying compliance with import requirements at the Canadian port of entry.

The Foreign Verification Office conducts food safety verifications at foreign food facilities that make and export food products to Canada, thus identifying and seeking to prevent offshore food safety issues at the point of production.

As it has no regulatory authority to conduct verifications in foreign premises, the Foreign Verifications Office works collaboratively with foreign food safety authorities to coordinate and implement its missions, as well as address its observations. Verifications are based on international standards for food safety (Codex Alimentarius), the CFIA's single-inspection approach and previous compliance history.

The Foreign Verification Office's pilot mission was conducted in the United Kingdom in December 2016 with subsequent missions to Portugal, Greece, Italy and the Philippines, for a total of 27 facility verifications in 2016-17. Following the initial mission to the United Kingdom, a post-mission review looked at the verification on site program and logistics. The review led to some adjustments to logistics, reporting and the risk-based planning, but the overall approach was deemed a success. The CFIA is committed to continuous improvement for all phases of the offshore verifications through the initial two-year funding period.

Expected Results: Risks to the Canadian public associated with the food supply system are mitigated

Results achieved
Performance indicators Target Date to achieve target 2016-17
Actual results
2015-16 Actual
results
2014-15 Actual
results
Number of commodity areas where inspected federally-registered establishments meet established compliance targets 6 out of 6 met March 31, 2017 6 out of 6 5 out of 6 5 out of 6
Meat and Poultry 98% March 31, 2017 97.5% 95.60% 97.7%
Egg 98% March 31, 2017 98.25% 96.22% 97%
Dairy 98% March 31, 2017 98.86% 99.00% 98%
Fish and Seafood 98% March 31, 2017 97.23% 98.11% 98.7%
Fresh Fruits and Vegetables 98% March 31, 2017 100% 98.85% 90.9%
Processed Products 98% March 31, 2017 98.97% 97.77% 96.8%
Percentage of Public Warnings for Class I food recalls that are issued within 24 hours of a recall decision 100% March 31, 2017 96.9%Footnote 2 95.03% 99.6%
Percentage of Public Warnings for Class II food recalls that are issued within 24 hours of a recall decision 95% March 31, 2017 100% 100% 100%
Expected Results: Domestic and imported food products are compliant with Canadian regulations and international agreements
Performance indicators Target Date to achieve target 2016-17
Actual results
2015-16 Actual
results
2014-15 Actual
results
Number of commodity areas where tested domestic food products meet established compliance targets 6 out of 6 met March 31, 2017 6 out of 6 6 out of 6 6 out of 6
Meat and Poultry 95% March 31, 2017 97.91% 97.32% 97.7%
Egg 95% March 31, 2017 98.88% 99.00% 98.7%
Dairy 95% March 31, 2017 96.52% 97.94% 96.1%
Fish and Seafood 95% March 31, 2017 98.99% 97.61% 97.6%
Fresh Fruits and Vegetables 95% March 31, 2017 99.10% 98.95% 98.8%
Processed Products 95% March 31, 2017 98.20% 98.12% 98.1%
Number of commodity areas where tested imported food products meet established compliance targets 6 out of 6 met March 31, 2017 5 out of 6 4 out of 6 4 out of 6
Meat and Poultry 95% March 31, 2017 98.1% 98.62% 99.6%
Egg 95% March 31, 2017 99.6% 99.53% 98.9%
Dairy 95% March 31, 2017 90.5% Footnote 3 88.54% 90.6%
Fish and Seafood 95% March 31, 2017 95.3% 87.89% 89%
Fresh Fruits and Vegetables 95% March 31, 2017 95.7% 96.83% 96.8%
Processed Products 95% March 31, 2017 97.6% 96.98% 96.2%

Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

CFIA performance targets are set to be achieved on a long term basis in support of the expected results. The CFIA monitors progress to achieve the targets and adjusts as appropriate.

For details on past performance and lessons learned for the Food Safety Program indicators that did not meet their target, please refer to the relevant section in past Departmental Performance Reports:

The following tables present the Food Safety Program's planned and actual spending and full-time equivalents for 2016-17.

Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2016-17
Main Estimates
2016-17
Planned spending
2016-17
Total authorities available for use
2016-17
Actual spending
(authorities used)
2016-17
Difference
(actual minus planned)
364,582,938 365,461,365 418,590,945 368,568,579 3,107,214

2016-17 Total Authorities Available for Use reflects additional in-year funding received for Treasury Board approved initiatives, statutory payment reimbursement, and other in-year adjustments. These adjustments totaled $53.1 million, mainly consisting of: the renewal of sunsetting initiatives; funds transferred from the previous fiscal year; and the addition of the Budget 2016 Improve Food Safety for Canadians initiative.

The variance of $50.0 million between Total Authorities and Actual Spending is mainly due to: funds being transferred to the next fiscal year to support various Treasury Board approved initiatives, such as the Federal Infrastructure Initiative and the electronic service delivery platform, and anticipated payments related to collective bargaining settlements; and lapses required to fund specific Government-wide initiatives.

Human resources (full-time equivalents)
2016-17
Planned
2016-17
Actual
2016-17
Difference
(actual minus planned)
3,116 3,220 104

The variance of 104 full-time equivalents is due to in-year funding received for Treasury Board approved initiatives. This increase is offset by the requirement for the CFIA to absorb the ongoing cost increases associated with collective bargaining settlement negotiations, resulting from a Government-wide freeze on departmental operating budgets for 2014-15 and 2015-16. Due to the timing of the preparation of the 2016-17 Report on Plans and Priorities, these adjustments were not accounted for in the Planned Spending.

Supporting information on results financial and human resources relating to CFIA's lower-level programs is available on the TBS InfoBase and on the Canadian Food Inspection Agency's website.

Animal Health and Zoonotics Program

Description

The Animal Health and Zoonotics Program aims to mitigate risks to Canada's animal resource base, animal feeds and animal products, which are integral to a safe and accessible food supply system as well as to public health. The program achieves its objectives by mitigating risks to Canada's animals (including livestock and aquatic animals) from regulated diseases, managing animal disease emergencies and incidents, limiting risks to livestock and derived food products associated with feed, promoting animal welfare and guarding against deliberate threats to the animal resource base. The program helps to mitigate risks associated with animal diseases that can be transmitted to humans by controlling diseases within animal populations. This program supports the health of Canada's animal resources and instills confidence in the safety of Canada's animals, animal products and by-products, and production systems.

Animal Health and Zoonotics Program. Description follows.
Description for image: Animal Health and Zoonotics Program

At the top of the image there are three boxes/shapes in a row.

The first box says:

  • Program

The second box says:

  • Expected Results

The third box says:

  • Government of Canada (GoC) Outcome Area

Under this row, there is a second row with an additional three boxes.

The first box is placed directly under the Program box. It says:

  • Animal Health and Zoonotics Program

There is an arrow from this box, pointing to the second box, which is directly below the "Expected Results" box.

It says:

  • Risk to Canadians from the transmission of animal diseases to humans are minimized
  • Domestic and imported animals and animal products are compliant with Canadian regulations and international agreements
  • Risk to the Canadian animal resource base are mitigated
  • Effective preparedness to prevent, control, and eradicate transboundary diseases and emerging diseases
  • Disease outbreaks in Canada are promptly and effectively responded to

There is an arrow from this box, pointing to the third box, which is directly below the "Government of Canada (GoC) Outcome Area" box, that says:

  • Strong Economic Growth
  • A Clean and Healthy Environment

The last row has one box which identifies the Key Risk Areas. It says:

  • Inspection Effectiveness
  • Scientific Capability
  • Legislative, Regulatory and Program Framework
  • Transparency and Leveraging Partnerships

Results

Regulatory Modernization to Enhance Safety and Market Access

An evaluation of the livestock traceability program and its performance against criteria approved by the federal and provincial governments was initiated in 2016-17. The evaluation and the program performance will be used to measure progress in the efficiency of the program and a subsequent evaluation is expected to be conducted in 2021, three years after proposed new regulations would come into force in 2018.

Proposed amendments to the Health of Animals Regulations, Part XII, were pre-published in the Canada Gazette, Part I Footnote 1, for stakeholder feedback. The objective of the proposed amendments is to improve the well-being of animals during transportation, make the regulations more outcome-based and align them better with major trading partners and international standards. Interpretive guidance for regulated parties was also posted on the CFIA website for stakeholder feedback. Comments were received from over 11,000 respondents and are being analysed.

Engaging International Partners to Enhance Safety and Market Access

In May 2016, Canada expanded its zoning arrangement for foreign animal disease outbreaks with the United States by signing new arrangements with Australia and New Zealand. These arrangements are intended to manage biosecurity risks while minimizing trade disruptions in the event of a foreign animal disease outbreak in a participating country. They aim to support the continuation of safe trade from areas that remain free from the disease in accordance with the World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE) rules for safe trade and the application of other controls, such as product treatments, to address biosecurity risks.

Building Scientific Capacity and Partnerships to Support Decision-Making

Antimicrobial resistance is a global and evolving public health concern. The loss of effective antimicrobials is reducing our ability to protect Canadians from infectious diseases, with profound impacts on our healthcare system, global trade, agriculture, environment and health sectors. The CFIA played a key role in the consultation with all stakeholders including federal, provincial, territorial governments, veterinary community, academia, and industry, in support of the development, under the leadership of the Public Health Agency of Canada, of the pan-Canadian Framework on antimicrobial resistance and antimicrobial use. The CFIA also engaged with stakeholders on developing better surveillance and stewardship programs. To that end, several workshops and working groups have been organized or supported by the CFIA to bring key experts together to plan the path forward. In February 2017, Health Canada posted its intent to move medically important antimicrobials to the prescription drug list, with implementation anticipated for December 2018. To reflect these changes, the CFIA revised the compendium of medicating ingredient brochures and has consulted with select stakeholders including veterinary associations, the feed industry and veterinary drug sponsors. The compendium lists those medicating ingredients permitted by the Canadian regulations to be added to livestock feed and are an important tool used by both government and industry. The revised brochures will be posted when the prescription switch is implemented and will contain new label and use information that has been approved by Health Canada. Internationally, the CFIA participated in activities including in Codex and the World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE), to advance the global action on antimicrobial resistance.

To support a shared national vision for effective, responsive, and integrated animal health surveillance, the CFIA continued to coordinate the implementation of the Canadian Animal Health Surveillance System. This is a federal/provincial/territorial and industry collaborative effort to build a network of industry, veterinary associations, academia, provincial governments, and the federal government for animal health surveillance. The CFIA coordinates the network and participates in its activities. Initiated in January 2015, the system has established the following:

  • A governance model with champion and director groups;
  • A purpose statement;
  • Core principles of practice and organization; a business case; and
  • A website, which acts as a clearing house of surveillance information in Canada.

In 2016-17, the system continued to strengthen animal health surveillance and enhance the CFIA's ability to respond to emergencies by forming surveillance network groups for swine, poultry, equine, dairy cattle and antimicrobial usage on farm. These groups are meeting regularly, supporting animal health, public health and market access through the sharing of information and developing surveillance projects. This collaborative approach is supporting improved information sharing and an increase in coordinated surveillance activities.

Under the umbrella of the Canadian Health Surveillance System, the Community for Emerging and Zoonotic Disease was established on April 1, 2016. It began a two-year implementation phase, in collaboration with Public Health Agency of Canada, industry, and the animal, public, and environmental health communities. This community is a virtual network that enables multidisciplinary experts to access and analyze information to produce early warning for emerging animal and zoonotic diseases. This virtual network supports Canada's disease prevention, preparedness and response capabilities through collaborative analysis and generation of strategic information.

Both the Canadian Animal Health Surveillance System and the Community for Emerging Zoonotic Diseases exemplify many of the values in the Plant and Animal Health Strategy which focuses on collaboration among federal, provincial, territorial and industry partners in animal health. The Strategy is further discussed under the "Partnering with Provincial and Territorial Governments" section in the Plant Resources Program.

Enhancing Service Excellence to Facilitate Market Access

The CFIA and the United States Department of Agriculture-Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service have implemented a pilot project to allow the use of electronically signed United States cattle export certificates in order to facilitate cattle imports from the United States to Canada. This project facilitates cattle and bison import transactions through four western Canadian/United States ports of entry:

  • Sweetgrass MT/Coutts AB
  • East Port ID/Kingsgate BC
  • Sumas WA/Abbotsford-Huntington BC
  • Oroville WA/Osoyoos BC

The new process has eliminated the requirement of presenting the original copy of the endorsed export certificate when crossing the United States/Canadian border. Implementation of this process allows for a more efficient and streamlined service for cattle and bison imports from the United States to Canada.

Responses to Emergency Events

In 2016-17, the CFIA responded to a number of animal disease events, including viral hemorrhagic septicemia, a deadly, infectious fish disease, in wild Atlantic herring harvested off the east coast of Canada; low pathogenic avian influenza involving one flock of approximately 14,000 ducks in Ontario; whirling disease, an infectious fatal disease in wild finfish; and bovine tuberculosis in Alberta. For more details on these events, please refer to the Supplementary Information section of this report.

Results achieved
Expected results Performance indicators Target Date to achieve target 2016-17
Actual results
2015-16 Actual
results
2014-15 Actual
results
Risks to Canadians from the transmission of animal diseases to humans are minimized Number of reportable animal diseases that have entered into Canada via specified regulated pathways 0 March 31, 2017 0 0 0
Percentage of cases where investigations were completed following the positive identification of a reportable zoonotic disease 100% March 31, 2017 100% 100% 100%
Domestic and imported animals and animal products are compliant with Canadian regulations and international agreements Percentage of legally exported animal and animal product shipments destined for foreign markets that meet certification requirements 99% March 31, 2017 100% 100% 100%
Canada's status on the OIE disease risk status lists remains either "free, controlled risk, or negligible risk" Status maintained March 31, 2017 Status maintained Status maintained Status maintained
Risks to the Canadian animal resource base are mitigated Percentage of cases where investigations were completed following the positive identification of a reportable animal disease 100% March 31, 2017 100% 100% 100%
Effective preparedness to prevent, control, and eradicate transboundary diseases and emerging diseases Manuals for CFIA officials are updated as needed 100% of all necessary manual updates are completed March 31, 2017 32% of necessary manual updates were completedFootnote 4 75% of necessary manual updates were completed 33% of necessary manual updates were completed
Number of emergency preparedness simulation exercises and drills in which CFIA participates 9 March 31, 2017 8Footnote 5 11 23
Disease outbreaks in Canada are promptly and effectively responded to Percentage of detections of reportable transboundary diseases and significant emerging diseases in which an investigation was commenced in a timely fashion 100% March 31, 2017 100% 100% 100%
Percentage of cases where CFIA communicated with key stakeholders in a timely fashion following the confirmation of a transboundary or significant emerging disease 100% March 31, 2017 100% 100% 100%

CFIA performance targets were set to be achieved on a long-term basis in support of the expected results. The CFIA monitors progress to achieve the targets and adjusts as appropriate.

For details on past performance and lessons learned for the Animal Health and Zoonotics indicators that did not meet their target, please refer to the relevant section in past departmental performance reports:

The following tables present the Animal Health and Zoonotic Program's planned and actual spending and full-time equivalents for 2016-17.

Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2016-17
Main Estimates
2016-17
Planned spending
2016-17
Total authorities available for use
2016-17
Actual spending
(authorities used)
2016-17
Difference
(actual minus planned)
137,163,044 138,055,855 187,159,735 173,246,450 35,190,595

The variance of $49.1 million between Planned Spending and Total Authorities is mainly related to statutory payments to compensate Canadians, in accordance with the appropriate regulations, for animals ordered destroyed for the purpose of disease control.

The variance of $13.9 million between Total Authorities and Actual Spending is mainly due to: cost savings related to the delivery of the Federal Infrastructure Initiative; lapses required to fund specific Government-wide initiatives; and funds being transferred to the next fiscal year to support anticipated payments related to collective bargaining settlements.

Human resources (full-time equivalents)

2016-17
Planned
2016-17
Actual
2016-17
Difference
(actual minus planned)
1,023 975 (48)

Full-time equivalents were impacted by the requirement for the CFIA to absorb the ongoing cost increases associated with collective bargaining settlement negotiations, resulting from a Government-wide freeze on departmental operating budgets for 2014-15 and 2015-16. Due to the timing of the preparation of the 2016-17 Report on Plans and Priorities, this adjustment was not accounted for in the Planned Spending.

Supporting information on results financial and human resources relating to CFIA's lower-level programs is available on the TBS InfoBase and on the Canadian Food Inspection Agency's website.

Plant Resources Program

Description

The Plant Resources Program aims to mitigate risks to Canada's plant resource base, which is integral to a safe and accessible food supply, as well as to public health and environmental sustainability. The program achieves its objectives by regulating agricultural and forestry products; mitigating risks to the plant resource base (including crops and forests) from regulated pests and diseases; regulating the safety and integrity of seeds, fertilizers and plant products; and managing plant health emergencies and incidents. The program also guards against deliberate threats to the plant resource base, facilitates the introduction of emerging plant technologies and protects the rights of plant breeders. Achieving the objectives of the program instills confidence in Canada's plants, plant production systems and plant products, and contributes to the health of Canada's plant resources.

Plant Resources Program. Description follows.
Description for image: Plant Resources Program

At the top of the image there are three boxes/shapes in a row.

The first box says:

  • Program

The second box says:

  • Expected Results

The third box says:

  • Government of Canada (GoC) Outcome Area

Under this row, there is a second row with an additional three boxes.

The first box is placed directly under the Program box. It says:

  • Plant Resources Program

There is an arrow from this box, pointing to the second box, which is directly below the "Expected Results" box.

It says:

  • Risks to the Canadian plant resource base from imported plants and plant products are mitigated
  • Domestic plants and plant products are compliant with Canadian regulations and international agreements
  • Confirmed introductions of quarantine pests in Canada are contained and risk-mitigated (e.g. through the issuance of Notices of Prohibition of Movement, Quarantine, up to and including the issuance of Ministerial Orders)
  • Canadian exports of plants and plant products meet the country of destination regulatory requirements and Canada's reputation is maintained

There is an arrow from this box, pointing to the third box, which is directly below the "Government of Canada (GoC) Outcome Area" box, that says:

  • Strong economic Growth
  • A Clean and Healthy Environment

The last row has one box which identifies the Key Risk Areas. It says:

  • Inspection Effectiveness
  • Scientific Capability
  • Legislative, Regulatory and Program Framework
  • Transparency and Leveraging Partnerships

Did you know …?

In 2016-17 the CFIA:

  • Signed a new agreement with Australia for the export of untreated sawn wood from Canada, worth over $40 million annually;
  • Successfully negotiated access to the European Union for Canadian kiln drying for ash lumber, worth $76 million annually; and
  • Expanded regulated areas for emerald ash borer to include the city of Thunder Bay and the municipalités Régionales de Comtés of Joliette and D'Autray in Quebec.

Did you know …?

Canada's leadership in international plant protection received recognition in May 2016 with the election of one of CFIA's leading experts on international phytosanitary standards, to the Bureau of the Commission on Phytosanitary Measures. The Commission on Phytosanitary Measures is the governing body of the International Plant Protection Convention. The seven-member Bureau provides guidance to the Commission on Phytosanitary Measures on the strategic direction, financial and operational management of its activities.

Results

Building Scientific Capacity and Partnerships to Support Decision-Making

The CFIA worked with the United States Department of Agriculture's Animal and Plant Health Inspection Services to further reinforce our strong agricultural ties and better align Canada's regulatory requirements with the United States. This work helps to maintain the regular flow of pest-free goods across the Canada/United States border, thus protecting the Canadian economy and environment. The work also contributes to strategies used at the North American perimeter to keep plant pests from affecting North America's crops, forests and environment.

Partnering with Provincial and Territorial Governments

In July 2016, a Federal-Provincial-Territorial Emergency Management Framework, referred to as the Framework, was endorsed by the Federal-Provincial-Territorial Ministers of Agriculture. This set the stage for partnering to create a Plant and Animal Health Strategy for Canada, along with planning for implementing short-term activities for the framework.

The Plant and Animal Health Strategy was co-created by federal, provincial and territorial governments, academia, industry and others who play a role in plant and animal health. These stakeholders share a goal of strengthening Canada's approach to protecting plant and animal health through better collaboration among partners, innovation, and a focus on risk prevention. Both CFIA and Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada have worked with the provinces/territories and industry to develop early activities for implementing the Strategy.

A national plant and animal health planning forum held in December 2016 discussed the future of plant and animal health, planned and prioritized actions to enhance plant and animal health in Canada, and identified multi-stakeholder volunteers to participate in working groups to further develop the plant and animal health strategy.

Results achieved
Expected results Performance indicators Target Date to achieve target 2016-17
Actual results
2015-16 Actual
results
2014-15 Actual
results
Risks to the Canadian plant resource base from imported plants and plant products are mitigated Number of regulated foreign plant pests that enter into Canada through regulated pathways and establish themselves 0 March 31, 2017 1Footnote 6 0 0
Domestic plants and plants products are compliant with Canadian regulations and international agreements Percentage of domestic seed, crop inputs and plants with novel traits in compliance with Canadian regulations and international agreements 90% March 31, 2017 93.2% 96.16% 98%
Confirmed introductions of quarantine pests in Canada are contained and risk-mitigated (e.g. through the issuance of Notices of Prohibition of Movement, Quarantine, up to and including the issuance of Ministerial Orders) Percentage of confirmed introductions of quarantine pests for which notices are issued 100% March 31, 2017 100% 100% 100%
Percentage of notices issued in a timely manner 90% March 31, 2017 100% 100% 100%
Canadian exports of plants and plant products meet the country of destination regulatory requirements and Canada's reputation is maintained Percentage of certified plants and plant products shipment (lots) that meet the country of destination phytosanitary import requirements 99% March 31, 2017 99.73% 99% 99.7%

CFIA performance targets are set to be achieved on a long term basis in support of the expected results. The CFIA monitors progress to achieve the targets and adjusts as appropriate.

The following tables present the Plant Resources Program's planned and actual spending and full-time equivalents for 2016-17.

Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2016-17
Main Estimates
2016-17
Planned spending
2016-17
Total authorities available for use
2016-17
Actual spending
(authorities used)
2016-17
Difference
(actual minus planned)
93,368,850 93,894,697 92,892,965 79,435,589 (14,459,108)

The variance of $1.0 million between Planned Spending and Total Authorities mainly results from an in-year technical adjustment.

The variance of $13.5 million between Total Authorities and Actual Spending is mainly due to: cost savings related to the delivery of the Federal Infrastructure Initiative; lapses required to fund specific Government-wide initiatives; and funds being transferred to the next fiscal year to support anticipated payments related to collective bargaining settlements.

Human resources (full-time equivalents)
2016-17 Planned 2016-17 Actual 2016-17
Difference (actual minus planned)
756 695 (61)

Full-time equivalents were impacted by the requirement for the CFIA to absorb the ongoing cost increases associated with collective bargaining settlement negotiations, resulting from a Government-wide freeze on departmental operating budgets for 2014-15 and 2015-16. Due to the timing of the preparation of the 2016-17 Report on Plans and Priorities, this adjustment was not accounted for in the Planned Spending.

Supporting information on results financial and human resources relating to CFIA's lower-level programs is available on the TBS InfoBase and on the Canadian Food Inspection Agency's website.

International Collaboration and Technical Agreements

Description

The Canadian Food Inspection Agency's International Collaboration and Technical Agreements program contributes to a coherent, predictable, and science-based international regulatory framework that facilitates meeting regulatory requirements of importing countries' food, animals, and plants, and their products, resulting in the facilitation of multi-billion dollar trade for the Canadian economy. The program achieves its objectives through active participating in international fora for the development of international science-based rules, standards, guidelines and policies and the management of sanitary and phytosanitary committees established under international agreements. The CFIA's active promotion of the Canadian science-based regulatory system with foreign trading partners and negotiations to resolve scientific and technical issues contribute to market access.

International Collaboration and Technical Agreements. Description follows.
Description for image: International Collaboration and Technical Agreements

At the top of the image there are three boxes/shapes in a row.

The first box says:

  • Program

The second box says:

  • Expected Results

The third box says:

  • Government of Canada (GoC) Outcome Area

Under this row, there is a second row with an additional three boxes.

The first box is placed directly under the Program box. It says:

  • International Collaboration and Technical Agreements

There is an arrow from this box, pointing to the second box, which is directly below the "Expected Results" box.

It says:

  • Canadian interests are reflected in science-based international rules, standards, Free Trade Agreements, and technical arrangements through effective participation in sanitary and phytosanitary (SPS) negotiations and international Standards Setting Bodies (ISSB) such as Codex, OIE, and IPPC
  • International markets are accessible to Canadian food, animals, plants and their products
  • International regulatory cooperation, relationship building and technical assistance activities that are in line with the CFIA's mandate

There is an arrow from this box, pointing to the third box, which is directly below the "Government of Canada (GoC) Outcome Area" box, that says:

  • A Fair and Secure Marketplace
  • A Prosperous Canada through Global Commerce

The last row has one box which identifies the Key Risk Areas. It says:

  • Scientific Capability
  • Legislative, Regulatory and Program Framework
  • Transparency and Leveraging Partnerships

Results

Did you know …?

This year, the CFIA successfully chaired the 43rd Session of the Codex Committee on Food Labelling, which is hosted by Canada.

This committee successfully advanced the development of draft guidance on the date marking of pre-packaged foods.

In 2016-17, the CFIA advanced priorities in the international and technical agreements program related to international standards and rules, regulatory cooperation, technical assistance, market access, and free-trade agreements.

International Rules and Standards

To promote the development of science-based international standards consistent with Canada's regulatory framework and Government of Canada objectives, the CFIA led Canada's participation at the International Plant Protection Convention, the World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE); and, with Health Canada, co-led Canada's participation at the Codex Alimentarius Commission.

To provide scientific support for the development of international standards, the CFIA enhanced its engagement in international standards-setting bodies by embedding Canadian technical experts in the World Organization for Animal Health (OIE), the International Plant Protection Convention, and the Food and Agriculture Organization's food safety and quality unit. Notably, the Canadian expert working in the International Plant Protection Convention is managing the development of a globally harmonized tool (e-phyto) to facilitate the adoption and exchange of electronic phytosanitary certificates between trading countries.

In 2016-17, Canada underwent the most comprehensive evaluation of its veterinary services to date. The evaluation was conducted by the World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE). The CFIA led the coordination of the evaluation at the federal, provincial/territorial level and, where relevant, with Canadian stakeholders. This evaluation plays an essential role in maintaining international confidence in Canada's domestic systems for animal health and animal welfare, and provides valuable feedback on areas of improvement for animal health. A final report will be available in 2017-18, outlining how Canada meets international veterinary standards and providing recommendations for improvement.

Regulatory Cooperation

The CFIA continued its active engagement with foreign counterparts in many countries, including the United States, Mexico, China, the European Union, and India in order to strengthen and expand partnerships to help manage risks before they arrive at the Canadian border, and share/learn best regulatory practices and advance food safety, animal health and plant health objectives.

In particular:

  • Canada and the United States have been collaborating to align regulatory approaches between the two countries, where appropriate, under the Regulatory Cooperation Council. In 2016-17 the CFIA and its United States counterparts made progress on multi-year Regulatory Cooperation Council projects and agreed to pursue a number of new initiatives:
    • In May 2016, the CFIA, Health Canada and the United States Federal Drug Administration Agency signed a Canada-United States Food Safety Systems Recognition Arrangement, and are currently working on its implementation. The CFIA is also advancing efforts with the United States Department of Agriculture towards the exchange of electronic certificates;
    • New Regulatory Cooperation Council initiatives that seek to mitigate risks between Canada and the United States, while facilitating trade, were initiated, including streamlining export requirements for meat traded between the two countries, aligning testing methodologies, and facilitating emergency transit of live animals;
    • Through the Canada-United States Beyond the Border initiative, the CFIA continued engagement with the United States regarding Asian gypsy moth-regulated countries to prevent the introduction of this pest into North America. Efforts in 2016-17 included: a Canada-United States joint assessment of Russia's Asian gypsy moth program and ongoing engagement with Russia, and engagement and collaboration with Chile and New Zealand to, where feasible, align requirements of their pre-departure certification programs with North America to simplify the work of regulated countries and the shipping industry.
  • On a trilateral level, the CFIA established regular senior-level meetings with counterparts in the United States and Mexico to discuss strategic direction and enhance collaboration towards common approaches in areas such as audits and e-certification in the meat sector. For example, in January 2017, the CFIA, the United States Food Safety Inspection Service and the Mexico National Service of Health, Food Safety and Agri-food Quality signed terms of reference for the Operational relationship in the trade of meat, poultry and egg products. The terms of reference set out a consistent process for the three countries to audit one another and outline procedures for determining equivalence, all of which will enhance market access.
  • With respect to the European Union, the CFIA's ongoing engagement with the European Commission's Directorate General for Health and Food Safety led to the European Union recognizing the Bluetongue disease seasonally free period for Canada in January 2017. Additionally, both the CFIA and the European Commission's Directorate General for Health and Food Safety are actively working on the implementation of a new sanitary and phytosanitary measures joint management committee, established under the recently signed Canada-European Union Comprehensive Economic and Trade Agreement.
  • With regards to fast-growing markets, the CFIA held several senior level and technical level meetings with regulatory counterparts in China and India to advance regulatory cooperation and resolution of market access issues.

Technical Assistance

The CFIA provided technical assistance by:

  • Delivering 14 information sharing activities in Canada in response to requests for technical assistance received from counterpart authorities in developing countries and emerging trade partner economies or Canadian organizations on their behalf.
  • Enhancing food safety through two major offshore technical assistance missions to deliver capacity-building workshops in Vietnam and India, with government and industry participants. This is a shift to complement domestic detection controls and interception of products as they enter Canada, and to enhance preventive controls to manage risks before entry into Canada.

Market Access Support

In 2016-17, the CFIA continued to promote the Canadian science-based regulatory system with counterparts in key trading countries, negotiated import and export conditions and resolved technical issues to expand or maintain access to markets. This was achieved with CFIA's specialists in Canada and abroad, resulting in the resolution of 64 market access issues, including the following:

  • Access has been maintained for canola to China until March 31, 2020, and, as of March 31, 2017, pulses to India until June 30, 2017.
  • Access has been expanded for beef to Mexico to include beef derived from animals over 30 months of age.
  • Access has been improved to China and Ukraine by expanding the number of Canadian meat establishments and cold storages eligible to export to these countries.
  • Access has been gained for breeding cattle to Turkey.
  • Access has been restored to multiple countries that imposed trade restrictions resulting from Canadian cases of notifiable avian influenza (2014, 2015 and 2016), bluetongue disease (September 2015) and BSE (February 2015). As well, negotiations have continued with countries for which import restrictions remain.
Results achieved
Expected results Performance indicators Target Date to achieve target 2016-17
Actual results
2015-16 Actual
results
2014-15 Actual
results
Canadian interests are reflected in science-based international rules, standards, Free Trade Agreements, and technical arrangements through effective participation in sanitary and phytosanitary negotiations and International Standards Setting Bodies such as Codex, OIE, and IPPC Number of key sanitary and phytosanitary negotiations and international standards setting bodies meetings where the CFIA promoted Canada's interests 36 March 31, 2017 36 38 43
International markets are accessible to Canadian food, animals, plants and their products Number of unjustified non-tariff barriers resolved 45 March 31, 2017 64Footnote 7 57 40
International regulatory cooperation, relationship building and technical assistance activities that are in line with the CFIA's mandate Number of senior level CFIA-led committees with foreign regulatory counterparts 4 March 31, 2017 4 6 7
Number of CFIA-led technical assistance activities provided to foreign national governments 8 March 31, 2017 16Footnote 8 11 13

The following tables present the International Collaboration and Technical Agreement Program's planned and actual spending and full-time equivalents for 2016-17.

Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2016-17
Main Estimates
2016-17
Planned spending
2016-17
Total authorities available for use
2016-17
Actual spending
(authorities used)
2016-17
Difference
(actual minus planned)
31,045,476 35,727,492 35,227,611 31,229,287 (4,498,205)

The variance of $4.0 million between Total Authorities and Actual Spending is mainly the result of funds being transferred to the next fiscal year to support anticipated payments related to collective bargaining settlements and lapses required to fund specific Government-wide initiatives.

Human resources (full-time equivalents)
2016-17 Planned 2016-17 Actual 2016-17
Difference (actual minus planned)
343 295 (48)

Full-time equivalents were impacted by the requirement for the CFIA to absorb the ongoing cost increases associated with collective bargaining settlement negotiations, resulting from a Government-wide freeze on departmental operating budgets for 2014-15 and 2015-16. Due to the timing of the preparation of the 2016-17 Report on Plans and Priorities, this adjustment was not accounted for in the Planned Spending.

Supporting information on results financial and human resources relating to CFIA's lower-level programs is available on the TBS InfoBase and on the Canadian Food Inspection Agency's website.

Internal Services

Description

Internal Services are those groups of related activities and resources that the federal government considers to be services in support of programs and/or required to meet corporate obligations of an organization. Internal Services refers to the activities and resources of the 10 distinct service categories that support program delivery in the organization, regardless of the Internal Services delivery model in a department. The 10 service categories are: Management and Oversight Services, Communications Services, Legal Services, Human Resources Management Services, Financial Management Services, Information Management Services, Information Technology Services, Real Property Services, Materiel Services, and Acquisition Services.

Results

In 2014-15, the CFIA developed a three-year plan for increasing internal awareness about privacy protection and developing a suite of policy tools to assist managers and staff in their day-to-day activities. In 2016-17, the CFIA worked on implementing, in two phases, the framework for privacy compliance measurement. This framework will provide a self-assessment tool for the various Agency programs and the Chief Privacy Officer.

Digital Communications

During 2016-17, the CFIA put effort into executing its digital communications implementation plan. The Agency has taken a "digital by default" approach and developed new products to support the organization's message, including innovative infographics and multiple videos. The Agency also developed a new corporate look, launched in February 2017. The new look represents the core of the Agency, while at the same time modernizing the way it presents itself. The new corporate look is aligned with Treasury Board Secretariat's federal identity program, which allows the public and stakeholders to easily recognize the CFIA. This consistent visual identity is important in today's digital world where communications products span many different platforms and media.

The CFIA increased its social media presence by launching a new YouTube channel in September 2016 and developing a strategy for targeted food recalls. This medium helped the Agency reach new audiences and open the conversation with Canadians, resulting in an increase of 42% of CFIA followers on its social media platforms.

The CFIA completed a pilot for the implementation of the e-Retrieval project to optimize access to information services within the Agency, reduce time and cost associated with the retrieval of electronic documents and to provide better service to clients while ensuring compliance with legislative deadlines.

Enhancing Investment Planning and Project Management

In 2016-17, the CFIA continued to enhance its investment planning management control. The Agency improved oversight and management of the investment planning practices by putting in place a more responsive regime that promotes sound stewardship, value for money and alignment with priorities. The CFIA continued the development of its business model with increased focus on client experience and how we structure our business to provide further strategic influence and operational guidance on the investment planning regime in future years. The Agency also completed and implemented its investment planning performance measurement framework.

To continue to improve its project management maturity, the CFIA is exploring the application of portfolio project management and program project management principles within our enterprise project management framework. The evaluation called for adjustments to the framework and governance model.

The Agency finalized its program for competency in project management, which will be implemented in phases over a three-year period, by aligning it to the Government of Canada direction on competencies in project management. The program proposes three pillars of competencies and four streams of project management levels. The launch of the program is expected in 2017-18. These advances will enhance CFIA's competencies in project management and efficiency and will lead to more value for taxpayers' money.

Modernizing and Consolidating Information Technology Applications to Enhance Service and Efficiency

As part of the Government of Canada community, the Agency must support many initiatives focusing on the standardization and centralization of IT applications, including the email transformation initiative and Shared Services Canada data center migration. During 2016-17, application and device readiness activities within the Agency have continued in advance of the move to the new email service of Microsoft Outlook. The planning for the Shared Services Canada data center migration and the workload migration from Windows 2003 servers has continued this fiscal year.

As part of the Government of Canada direction for standardization management of information holdings, the CFIA has been developing products required to transition our document management system to the common Government of Canada documents management system.

Did you know …?

The CFIA has posted an annual progress report on Blueprint 2020 on YouTube?

Human Resources

The CFIA continued to support the Blueprint 2020 (BP2020) vision of creating and maintaining a world-class public service equipped to serve Canada and Canadians. The Agency focused its efforts in areas relating to recruitment, fostering a respectful workforce, and innovation. Activities during the reporting period included outreach to Indigenous communities via an Indigenous recruitment video and on-campus recruitment; continuation of the HOPE peer support (mental health) program; and the launch of "Ask CFIA," an online portal to respond to inquiries from regulated parties.

Training in values and ethics continued to be a mandatory requirement for all new employees. It is part of our orientation program, as well as our prerequisite employment program and our program for the leadership development of supervisors. Regular communication to employees through our internal national information bulletins reminded employees of their value and ethics obligations and outlined the e-learning and in classroom training that was available to them. Values and Ethics Day, held on February 16, 2017, focused on raising awareness of internal support mechanisms and programs available to employees.

The CFIA identified trends and opportunities for continuous improvement within the Agency's collective staffing process. These opportunities entail addressing recommendations made by the Office of the Staffing Ombudsman, including conducting a risk assessment exercise. The role of that exercise is to identify high-, medium- and low-risk areas informing the staffing accountability matrix, policy suite and future monitoring program. In addition, the staffing framework policy has been updated, effective April 2016, and has been replaced with staffing and recruitment framework, staffing and recruitment policy, and specific staffing guidelines. The new policy suite includes clarification on roles, responsibilities and accountability for staffing.

The Agency has developed relations with post-secondary institutions to promote student career opportunities in the federal public service and the CFIA, and has established an online presence in the recruitment spheres.

Open Government Implementation

The Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat directive on open government, effective on October 9, 2014, requires that departments and agencies maximize the release of Government of Canada open data and open information. During 2016-17, the CFIA executed the Agency's open government implementation plan by completing a benchmarking scan of transparency and openness activities by domestic and international counterparts that identified best practices and areas for improvement. In addition, the Agency completed a revised transparency policy, which will provide direction for future transparency and openness activities.

The following tables present the Internal Services Program's planned and actual spending and full-time equivalents for 2016-17.

Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2016-17
Main Estimates
2016-17
Planned spending
2016-17
Total authorities available for use
2016-17
Actual spending
(authorities used)
2016-17
Difference
(actual minus planned)
113,578,857 113,999,756 139,270,484 133,431,955 19,432,199

The variance of $25.3 million between Planned Spending and Total Authorities mainly results from: the distribution of in-year authorities to facilitate the realignment of resources between Programs and Internal Services, ensuring compliance with the amended Treasury Board Guide on Recording and Reporting of Internal Services Expenditures; the renewal of sunsetting initiatives; and the addition of the Budget 2016 initiative Improve Food Safety for Canadians.

The variance of $5.8 million between Total Authorities and Actual Spending is mainly the result of funds being transferred to the next fiscal year to support anticipated payments related to collective bargaining settlements and lapses required to fund specific Government-wide initiative.

Human resources (full-time equivalents)
2016-17 Planned 2016-17 Actual 2016-17
Difference (actual minus planned)
749 916 167

The variance of 167 full-time equivalents (FTEs) is largely related to: the realignment of resources between Programs and Internal Services, in order to comply with the amended Treasury Board Guide on Recording and Reporting of Internal Services Expenditures; and in-year funding received for Treasury Board approved initiatives.

This increase was somewhat offset by the requirement for the CFIA to absorb the ongoing cost increases associated with collective bargaining settlement negotiations, resulting from a Government-wide freeze on departmental operating budgets for 2014-15 and 2015-16. Due to the timing of the preparation of the 2016-17 Report on Plans and Priorities, this adjustment was not accounted for in the Planned Spending.

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