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2016-2017 Departmental Results Report

PDF (907 kb)
ISBN: 2561-0775

The original version was signed by

The Honourable Ginette Petitpas Taylor, PC, MP
Minister of Health

For the period ending March 31, 2017

Table of Contents

Minister's Message

Minister of Health
The Honourable Ginette Petitpas
Taylor, PC, MP Minister of Health

I invite you to read the 2016-17 Departmental Results Report for the Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA). In it, you will find the many ways that the CFIA works to protect Canadians through safeguarding the food supply and the plant and animal resources on which it depends.

Government and industry collaboration in support of food safety continued in 2016-17. In January 2017, a key milestone on the path to enhanced food safety protection and controls in Canada was achieved with the pre-publication of the proposed Safe Food for Canadians Regulations in Canada Gazette, Part I. The CFIA consulted thousands of Canadians in-person and virtually during multiple webinars, information sessions and other meetings, resulting in over 1,300 submissions. The Agency is currently reviewing all of the feedback that was received and final publication of the regulations is anticipated in the spring of 2018.

Regarding animal health, collaboration continued with the ongoing implementation of the Canadian Animal Health Surveillance System. The system, made up of a nationwide network of groups and individuals, supports animal health surveillance in Canada by drawing on the disease detection abilities of Canadian veterinarians, provincial and university laboratories and the federal government. In 2016-17, the CFIA also proposed changes to the Health of Animals Regulations via pre-publication in Canada Gazette, Part I that would help improve animal welfare and reduce the risk of animal suffering during transport.

In 2016-17, the CFIA continued to make strides in plant protection with amendments to the Weed Seeds Order. The amendments, published in May 2016 in Canada Gazette, Part II, will help reduce the number of weed species introduced in Canada through seed. In July 2016, federal, provincial and territorial Ministers of Agriculture endorsed the emergency management framework for agriculture. The Framework represents a commitment to collectively prevent, prepare for, respond to and recover from agriculture emergencies. In 2016-17, discussions on the future of plant and animal health in Canada began, as governments, industry, academia and stakeholders started to develop the plant and animal health strategy, a key deliverable of the 2016 emergency management framework for agriculture. The strategy focuses on collaboration, innovation and risk prevention in support of plant and animal health.

In support of consumer protection, the CFIA has continued to execute its "digital-by-default" approach to communications. This gives Canadians easy access to important information, such as food recalls, when and where they want, and enables the Agency to use innovative tools like infographics and videos to reach Canadians. With its digital first efforts, including the launch of a YouTube channel, the CFIA's social media audience grew by 42% in 2016-17.

The CFIA continued to support market access. The Agency's work with domestic and international partners supports billions of dollars in trade for the Canadian economy and advances Canada's food safety, animal health and plant health objectives. For example, market access was expanded to Mexico for beef from animals over 30 months of age, maintained for canola to China, gained for breeding cattle to Turkey and restored or maintained for various commodities in multiple countries. In May 2016, Canada and the United States signed a Canada-United States Food Safety Systems Recognition Arrangement and are working toward its implementation. Recognizing another country's food safety controls as comparable to our own aids the flow of goods between the two countries and allows us to focus on commodities from other countries that may not have the same controls as we do.

This report outlines the CFIA's many achievements, none of which would be possible without the hard work and dedication of Agency employees. It is the skill, integrity and professionalism that they bring to their roles each and every day that enable the CFIA to fulfill its vital mandate to Canadians. I am confident that their dedication to service excellence will enable the Agency to continue to meet its goals and maintain its reputation as an internationally recognized science based regulator.

The Honourable Ginette Petitpas Taylor, PC, MP
Minister of Health

Results at a glance

Through its day-to-day activities, the CFIA performs these functions:

The CFIA performs these functions by developing and administering regulations that are monitored and enforced.

In 2016-17, the CFIA focused its activities in the following three areas:

Strengthening Food Safety and Consumer Protection, and Protecting Animal and Plant Health

Achievements included:

Supporting Market Access

Achievements included the following:

Enhancing Service Delivery

The CFIA's achievements include the following:

The total resources used by the Agency for 2016-17 are as follows:

For more information on the CFIA's plans, priorities and results achieved, see the "Results: what we achieved" section of this report.

Raison d'être, mandate and role: who we are and what we do

Raison d'être

The Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) is a large science-based regulatory agency with 6,927 employees working across Canada in the National Capital Region and in four operational regions: Atlantic, Quebec, Ontario and Western Canada.

The CFIA is dedicated to safeguarding food safety and animal and plant health, which enhances Canada's environment, economy, and the health and well-being of its residents. To support market access, the CFIA works with Canada's trading partners to verify that Canadian products meet importing countries' technical requirements, thus expanding, gaining, restoring or maintaining access to markets.

Mandate and role

CFIA's Key Federal Partners

  • Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada
  • Canada Border Services Agency
  • Canadian Grain Commission
  • Environment and Climate Change Canada, including the Canadian Wildlife Service
  • Fisheries and Oceans Canada
  • Global Affairs Canada
  • Health Canada
  • Natural Resources Canada, including the Canadian Forest Service
  • Public Health Agency of Canada
  • Public Safety Canada

The CFIA develops program requirements, conducts laboratory testing, and delivers inspections and other services in order to:

The CFIA bases its activities on science, effective risk management, a commitment to service and efficiency, and collaboration with domestic and international organizations that share its objectives.

The CFIA shares its responsibilities with various levels of government, with which it implements food safety, plant and animal health measures, and manages risks, incidents, and emergencies.

The CFIA administers and enforces 14 federal statutes and 34 sets of regulations. In addition to supporting a sustainable plant and animal resource base, these statutes and regulations regulate the safety and quality of food and agricultural inputs sold in Canada, such as feed, seed, fertilizers and veterinary biologics.

For more general information about the agency, please refer to the "Supplementary information" section of this report.

Operating context and key risks

Operating context

At the CFIA, decisions are based on timely, relevant science that informs policy development, program design and program delivery. To keep pace with changing risks, the CFIA strives to streamline and improve its processes, advance its science, harness innovation and embrace technologies to better serve Canadians and build for the future.

Daily operations are driven by both external and internal influences and factors. The CFIA uses both prevention and responsive measures in managing these factors.

Did you know …?

The National Import Service Centre at the CFIA ensures goods imported into Canada meet the necessary requirements for food safety, and plant and animal health.

External Influences

External factors that influenced CFIA's operating environment include:

Internal Operating Environment

Internal factors that influenced our operating environment included:

  • More preventive approach to food safety
  • Increased focus on the use of online tools to provide service:
    • My CFIA
    • "Ask CFIA"
  • A single inspection approach
  • Harnessing better risk information to support decision-making and allocation of resources

Internal Influences

Over the last year, the internal operating environment at the CFIA has included modernizing regulations, developing new tools to support integrated risk management, moving towards a single inspection approach, creating digital tools and services as well as supporting international consensus to safeguard food safety, and plant and animal health while supporting market access.

Key risks

Every organization is influenced by risk. Risk is the effect that uncertainty has on the achievement of an organization's objectives and often presents an opportunity the organization can exploit for effectiveness and/or efficiency.

The CFIA continues to use risk analysis to inform decision-making, to respond to change and uncertainty, to optimize its allocation of resources, and, overall, to provide better results for Canadians in the areas of food safety, consumer protection and protecting Canada's plant and animal resources. The CFIA has a strong culture of risk management and is always striving to improve its approach.

As a risk-based organization, the CFIA integrates risk information in its planning and operations to effectively deliver its mandate and to improve how it mobilizes resources in response to new threats. To manage risk effectively, the CFIA promotes risk prevention activities, has risk mitigation measures in place, monitors and responds to risks at various levels and takes advantage of potential opportunities while minimizing the impact of unplanned or unfortunate events.

Prevention activities cannot eliminate all risks. Responding to food safety, and plant and animal health risks is part of the CFIA's mandate and operating context. In addition to the day-to-day response activities, the CFIA focused on the risk areas listed in the following table, in line with its Corporate Risk Profile.

Key Risk Table

Risks Mitigating strategy and effectiveness Link to the department's programs Link to government-wide and departmental priorities

Managing Change: The ability to effectively manage change on an ongoing basis.

The global evolution of economic, social and environmental factors influences the regulatory and business environment within which the Agency operates.

Strengthen risk management through:

  • Implementation of a framework for integrated risk management that provides the policy, structures, and business processes for the organization to better understand the relative nature of risk, and to manage it more effectively.
  • Commenced using risk management tool to identify risks that may impact the public. Plant, animal and food risks are weighed and compared using objective, science-based evidence on their potential to cause health, economic, and environmental harm. Control measures needed to manage the impact of the risks and the associated costs are identified.
  • Began using a new risk assessment approach, called establishment-based risk assessment model, to rank food processing establishments. This approach to risk assessment uses a mathematical tool that ranks food-processing establishments in terms of risk.
  • Commenced the development of profiles for mandate based risks across and within the plant, animal and food programs.
  • Conducted Phase I consultation with industry on service fees.
  • Advanced the use of consistent business approaches such as implementing single access point for technical questions from industry (i.e. "Ask CFIA").
Linked to the CFIA's Strategic Outcome of a safe and accessible food supply and plant and animal resource base. CFIA: Integrated Risk Management and Integrated Business Planning

Scientific Capability: The ability to have the scientific capability to adapt and respond in a timely manner.

Advancements in science and technology have increased the complexity of the commodities the Agency regulates. There is also growing international consensus on the need for common scientific equipment and approaches to support industry oversight and the global agri-food trade.

  • Worked with other regulatory organizations in the global market to share information and gain efficiencies.
    • Continued to work with our United States counterparts, under the Regulatory Cooperation Council (RCC).
  • Collaborated with trading partners and international organizations, including the following:
    • World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE)
    • International Plant Protection Convention (IPPC)
    • Codex Alimentarius Commission (CODEX)
    • World Health Organization (WHO)
    • Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO)
  • Continued to build and implement key networks to support sharing of scientific data such as the Canadian Food Safety Information Network and Canadian Animal Health Surveillance Network.
  • Developed a strategic plan for a workforce of the future at CFIA.
Linked to the CFIA's Strategic Outcome of a safe and accessible food supply and plant and animal resource base.

Government of Canada: Security and Opportunity

Government of Canada: Open and transparent government.

CFIA: Integrated Risk Management and Integrated Business Planning

Inspection Effectiveness: The ability to have appropriate inspection effectiveness to expeditiously prevent, detect and respond to threats to food safety, animals and plants.

The Agency continued to move to a more preventative and structured approach to inspection across all three of its business lines – food, plants and animals.

  • The single and consistent inspection approach, called the Integrated Agency Inspection Model, is being implemented across business lines and commodities.
  • The approach was implemented in phases, with continuous testing and improvements as necessary, starting with fish, dairy and fresh fruit and vegetables.
  • Once fully implemented, the single inspection approach will ensure consistent inspection across all commodities, feeding into and supporting integrated risk management and business planning.
Linked to the CFIA's Strategic Outcome of a safe and accessible food supply and plant and animal resource base.

Government of Canada: Security and Opportunity

CFIA: Comprehensive Food Strategy

Emergency Management: The ability to respond to multiple simultaneous or large-scale emergencies.

The CFIA has a well-planned emergency preparedness and response capacity. However, threat environments continue to evolve, requiring regular updating of plans and responses to reflect changes and find efficiencies to ensure that the Agency maintains a minimum of essential business functions during emergencies.

  • CFIA's National Emergency Operations Centres responded to avian influenza in Ontario and bovine tuberculosis (bTB) investigation in Alberta and Saskatchewan.
  • To strengthen Canada's ability to respond to emergencies, federal, provincial and territorial ministers of agriculture endorsed the emergency management framework for agriculture in Canada that charts a path forward for collectively addressing evolving risks to plant and animal health, focusing efforts on prevention and increased partner collaboration and coordination.
Linked to the CFIA's Strategic Outcome of a safe and accessible food supply and plant and animal resource base. CFIA: Integrated Risk Management

Results: what we achieved

Programs

Food Safety Program

Description

The Food Safety Program aims to mitigate risks to public health associated with diseases and other health hazards in the food supply system and to manage food safety emergencies and incidents. The program achieves its objectives by promoting food safety awareness through public engagement and verification of compliance by industry with standards and science-based regulations. The program delivers initiatives to verify that consumers receive food safety and nutrition information and to mitigate unfair market practices targeting consumers and industry. Collaboration with other governments and stakeholders further enhances the Agency's ability to track, detect and mitigate risks associated with food and the food supply system, including food-borne illness. This program supports public health and instils confidence in Canada's food system.

Food Safety Program. Description follows.
Description for image: Food Safety Program

At the top of the image there are three boxes/shapes in a row.

The first box says:

  • Program

The second box says:

  • Expected Results

The third box says:

  • Government of Canada (GoC) Outcome Area

Under this row, there is a second row with an additional three boxes.

The first box is placed directly under the Program box. It says:

  • Food Safety Program

There is an arrow from this box, pointing to the second box, which is directly below the "Expected Results" box.

It says:

  • Risks to the Canadian public associated with the food supply system are mitigated
  • Domestic and imported food products are compliant with Canadian regulations and international agreements

There is an arrow from this box, pointing to the third box, which is directly below the "Government of Canada (GoC) Outcome Area" box, that says:

  • Healthy Canadians

The last row has one box which identifies the Key Risk Areas. It says:

  • Inspection Effectiveness
  • Scientific Capability
  • Legislative, Regulatory and Program Framework
  • Transparency and Leveraging Partnerships

Results

Regulatory Modernization to Enhance Safety and Efficiency

While the Safe Food for Canadians Act received Royal Assent in 2012, new regulations are needed for the Act to come in to force. The CFIA achieved a key milestone on January 2017, when the proposed Safe Food for Canadians Regulations were published in Canada Gazette, Part I Footnote 1. This was followed by a 90-day public comment period, during which the public provided feedback on the proposed regulations. During the same period, the CFIA showcased innovative digital tools at engagement sessions and on its website to help businesses and consumers understand the proposed regulations. The tools included interactive decision-making tools, guides, templates, videos, infographics and multilingual fact sheets. At these sessions, CFIA experts answered participants' questions related to the proposed Safe Food for Canadians Regulations and reinforced the Agency's commitment to service excellence and to ensuring industry readiness for the new regulations.

The Safe Food for Canadians Act will provide Canadians with better protection from unsafe food through the introduction of stronger authorities to prevent tampering, implementation of updated food safety control systems that align with internationally recognized standards, enhancement of controls over imported food commodities and improvement of recall systems.

To help stakeholders understand the Safe Food for Canadians Regulations and to promote early adoption of best practices in food safety, the CFIA released plain language guidance materials and templates. To further facilitate industry's readiness for the coming into force of the regulations, models systems and additional interpretive guidance materials are being developed and will be released leading up to the final publication of the regulations in Canada Gazette, Part II Footnote 1 in 2018.

Canadian Food Safety Information Network

The development of the Canadian Food Safety Information Network continues to advance by engaging federal/provincial/territorial partners. Since the project launch in November 2014, progress has been made in a number of areas that are critical to the success of the initiative, such as:

When fully implemented in 2018-19, the Canadian Food Safety Information Network will benefit Canadians by bringing together surveillance, monitoring, analysis and surge capacity, and capabilities across the full extent of the food supply chain. These efforts will allow near-real-time sharing, collecting and analysis of food safety data and enabling the generation of pan-Canadian performance evidence to demonstrate food safety system effectiveness to trading partners.

The Food Labelling Modernization Initiative

During 2016-17, the CFIA engaged stakeholders on proposals to modernize food labelling regulations. These proposals were based on issues and options identified by stakeholders in earlier phases of engagement, taking into consideration food labelling changes proposed by Health Canada and in international standards and practices. Over 2,500 stakeholders participated in consultations. The proposals for modernizing food labelling will update regulations in areas such as date marking, information on company contact, and legibility. The regulations will also use incorporation by reference for items such as food standards and class names.

The proposals included a new approach for managing truthful and not misleading food labelling that is based on risk. Implementation of the proposals, beginning in 2017-18, will enable better-informed purchasing decisions by Canadians, while supporting the food industry's ability to innovate and to gain market access.

Assessing Risks in Food Establishments

The Establishment-based Risk Assessment model is an applied mathematical algorithm that assesses the food safety risks associated with establishments under CFIA jurisdiction. The model generates results based on the level of food safety risks they represent to consumers. The development of the model was completed for all food commodities in 2016-17. The model was tested and validated in the dairy and meat/poultry commodities. Building on that success, national data collection was launched for dairy and meat and poultry registered establishments. A pilot was conducted in the fish and seafood commodity and its results are currently being validated. National data collection from fish and seafood establishments is ongoing. The results from the model will be used to guide and support risk-based integrated planning and decision making at the CFIA.

Food Safety Oversight Initiative

The food safety oversight initiative is intended to enhance surveillance through focusing resources on inspection and testing/analysis that supports controls for fresh fruits and vegetables, fish and seafood, and imported and manufactured foods. Updates to program design and direction to staff have improved the CFIA's ability to monitor, inspect and proactively manage risks, thus improving consumer protection. With respect to foreign countries, CFIA has built internal capacity and developed tools, which have resulted in assessments of fresh fruits and vegetables controls in two priority countries. These assessments and continued engagement with additional foreign authorities improve CFIA's management of these sectors.

Implementing Electronic Service Delivery

The CFIA's "digital first" initiative maximizes the use of new technologies to improve networking, enhance access to data and boost client services. It is about enabling paperless data exchange. As part of this initiative, the electronic service delivery platform supports Agency modernization by providing a set of technologies and tools for citizens, industry, international trading partners, and CFIA inspectors to support their respective roles and facilitate regular business transactions.

As scheduled under the electronic service delivery platform project, the "My CFIA" portal went live in January 2017. The platform provides industry with a secure, innovative suite of online services conveniently accessible anywhere, anytime. The first release enabled clients in Canada's domestic dairy sector to apply or renew their establishment registration online. The CFIA has continued to work to extend applying online for other permissions (permits, licenses) to other sectors; it will also be possible to request certain export certificates online.

For more information on "My CFIA," please visit the "My CFIA" webpage.

In June 2016, the CFIA launched a new service called "Ask CFIA" in response to stakeholders need for direct access to consistent and easy to understand information and the desire for access to technical expertise in the Agency. "Ask CFIA" provides regulated parties with one point of contact to ask questions to help them understand and comply with CFIA-regulatory requirements. Increased regulatory understanding and compliance will provide Canadians with a stronger food safety system and better protection for plant and animal health. "Ask CFIA" was initially made available to the following sectors: dairy, fish and seafood, fresh fruits and vegetables, maple products, honey and egg and egg products. Additional sectors will be phased in until all CFIA regulated sectors are included. The Agency will continue to test and refine its internal processes and plans to evaluate the performance of the "Ask CFIA" service. $1.3 million was assigned to the initiative.

Did you know …?

The "Ask CFIA" team received an honourable mention for the Canadian Federation of Independent Business's Golden Scissors Award for individuals or groups who have successfully motivated or demonstrated leadership and courage, and produced meaningful and positive results in cutting red tape for small business.

For more information on "Ask CFIA", please visit the "Ask CFIA" webpage.

Proactive Offshore Preventative Activities

To help trading partners comply with Canada's import food regulations, the CFIA is increasing its proactive offshore preventative activities. In this approach, compliance is verified at exporting countries' establishments by assessing manufacturing practices and/or inspection systems. This is a shift from verifying compliance with import requirements at the Canadian port of entry.

The Foreign Verification Office conducts food safety verifications at foreign food facilities that make and export food products to Canada, thus identifying and seeking to prevent offshore food safety issues at the point of production.

As it has no regulatory authority to conduct verifications in foreign premises, the Foreign Verifications Office works collaboratively with foreign food safety authorities to coordinate and implement its missions, as well as address its observations. Verifications are based on international standards for food safety (Codex Alimentarius), the CFIA's single-inspection approach and previous compliance history.

The Foreign Verification Office's pilot mission was conducted in the United Kingdom in December 2016 with subsequent missions to Portugal, Greece, Italy and the Philippines, for a total of 27 facility verifications in 2016-17. Following the initial mission to the United Kingdom, a post-mission review looked at the verification on site program and logistics. The review led to some adjustments to logistics, reporting and the risk-based planning, but the overall approach was deemed a success. The CFIA is committed to continuous improvement for all phases of the offshore verifications through the initial two-year funding period.

Expected Results: Risks to the Canadian public associated with the food supply system are mitigated

Results achieved
Performance indicators Target Date to achieve target 2016-17
Actual results
2015-16 Actual
results
2014-15 Actual
results
Number of commodity areas where inspected federally-registered establishments meet established compliance targets 6 out of 6 met March 31, 2017 6 out of 6 5 out of 6 5 out of 6
Meat and Poultry 98% March 31, 2017 97.5% 95.60% 97.7%
Egg 98% March 31, 2017 98.25% 96.22% 97%
Dairy 98% March 31, 2017 98.86% 99.00% 98%
Fish and Seafood 98% March 31, 2017 97.23% 98.11% 98.7%
Fresh Fruits and Vegetables 98% March 31, 2017 100% 98.85% 90.9%
Processed Products 98% March 31, 2017 98.97% 97.77% 96.8%
Percentage of Public Warnings for Class I food recalls that are issued within 24 hours of a recall decision 100% March 31, 2017 96.9%Footnote 2 95.03% 99.6%
Percentage of Public Warnings for Class II food recalls that are issued within 24 hours of a recall decision 95% March 31, 2017 100% 100% 100%
Expected Results: Domestic and imported food products are compliant with Canadian regulations and international agreements
Performance indicators Target Date to achieve target 2016-17
Actual results
2015-16 Actual
results
2014-15 Actual
results
Number of commodity areas where tested domestic food products meet established compliance targets 6 out of 6 met March 31, 2017 6 out of 6 6 out of 6 6 out of 6
Meat and Poultry 95% March 31, 2017 97.91% 97.32% 97.7%
Egg 95% March 31, 2017 98.88% 99.00% 98.7%
Dairy 95% March 31, 2017 96.52% 97.94% 96.1%
Fish and Seafood 95% March 31, 2017 98.99% 97.61% 97.6%
Fresh Fruits and Vegetables 95% March 31, 2017 99.10% 98.95% 98.8%
Processed Products 95% March 31, 2017 98.20% 98.12% 98.1%
Number of commodity areas where tested imported food products meet established compliance targets 6 out of 6 met March 31, 2017 5 out of 6 4 out of 6 4 out of 6
Meat and Poultry 95% March 31, 2017 98.1% 98.62% 99.6%
Egg 95% March 31, 2017 99.6% 99.53% 98.9%
Dairy 95% March 31, 2017 90.5% Footnote 3 88.54% 90.6%
Fish and Seafood 95% March 31, 2017 95.3% 87.89% 89%
Fresh Fruits and Vegetables 95% March 31, 2017 95.7% 96.83% 96.8%
Processed Products 95% March 31, 2017 97.6% 96.98% 96.2%

Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

CFIA performance targets are set to be achieved on a long term basis in support of the expected results. The CFIA monitors progress to achieve the targets and adjusts as appropriate.

For details on past performance and lessons learned for the Food Safety Program indicators that did not meet their target, please refer to the relevant section in past Departmental Performance Reports:

The following tables present the Food Safety Program's planned and actual spending and full-time equivalents for 2016-17.

Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2016-17
Main Estimates
2016-17
Planned spending
2016-17
Total authorities available for use
2016-17
Actual spending
(authorities used)
2016-17
Difference
(actual minus planned)
364,582,938 365,461,365 418,590,945 368,568,579 3,107,214

2016-17 Total Authorities Available for Use reflects additional in-year funding received for Treasury Board approved initiatives, statutory payment reimbursement, and other in-year adjustments. These adjustments totaled $53.1 million, mainly consisting of: the renewal of sunsetting initiatives; funds transferred from the previous fiscal year; and the addition of the Budget 2016 Improve Food Safety for Canadians initiative.

The variance of $50.0 million between Total Authorities and Actual Spending is mainly due to: funds being transferred to the next fiscal year to support various Treasury Board approved initiatives, such as the Federal Infrastructure Initiative and the electronic service delivery platform, and anticipated payments related to collective bargaining settlements; and lapses required to fund specific Government-wide initiatives.

Human resources (full-time equivalents)
2016-17
Planned
2016-17
Actual
2016-17
Difference
(actual minus planned)
3,116 3,220 104

The variance of 104 full-time equivalents is due to in-year funding received for Treasury Board approved initiatives. This increase is offset by the requirement for the CFIA to absorb the ongoing cost increases associated with collective bargaining settlement negotiations, resulting from a Government-wide freeze on departmental operating budgets for 2014-15 and 2015-16. Due to the timing of the preparation of the 2016-17 Report on Plans and Priorities, these adjustments were not accounted for in the Planned Spending.

Supporting information on results financial and human resources relating to CFIA's lower-level programs is available on the TBS InfoBase and on the Canadian Food Inspection Agency's website.

Animal Health and Zoonotics Program

Description

The Animal Health and Zoonotics Program aims to mitigate risks to Canada's animal resource base, animal feeds and animal products, which are integral to a safe and accessible food supply system as well as to public health. The program achieves its objectives by mitigating risks to Canada's animals (including livestock and aquatic animals) from regulated diseases, managing animal disease emergencies and incidents, limiting risks to livestock and derived food products associated with feed, promoting animal welfare and guarding against deliberate threats to the animal resource base. The program helps to mitigate risks associated with animal diseases that can be transmitted to humans by controlling diseases within animal populations. This program supports the health of Canada's animal resources and instills confidence in the safety of Canada's animals, animal products and by-products, and production systems.

Animal Health and Zoonotics Program. Description follows.
Description for image: Animal Health and Zoonotics Program

At the top of the image there are three boxes/shapes in a row.

The first box says:

  • Program

The second box says:

  • Expected Results

The third box says:

  • Government of Canada (GoC) Outcome Area

Under this row, there is a second row with an additional three boxes.

The first box is placed directly under the Program box. It says:

  • Animal Health and Zoonotics Program

There is an arrow from this box, pointing to the second box, which is directly below the "Expected Results" box.

It says:

  • Risk to Canadians from the transmission of animal diseases to humans are minimized
  • Domestic and imported animals and animal products are compliant with Canadian regulations and international agreements
  • Risk to the Canadian animal resource base are mitigated
  • Effective preparedness to prevent, control, and eradicate transboundary diseases and emerging diseases
  • Disease outbreaks in Canada are promptly and effectively responded to

There is an arrow from this box, pointing to the third box, which is directly below the "Government of Canada (GoC) Outcome Area" box, that says:

  • Strong Economic Growth
  • A Clean and Healthy Environment

The last row has one box which identifies the Key Risk Areas. It says:

  • Inspection Effectiveness
  • Scientific Capability
  • Legislative, Regulatory and Program Framework
  • Transparency and Leveraging Partnerships

Results

Regulatory Modernization to Enhance Safety and Market Access

An evaluation of the livestock traceability program and its performance against criteria approved by the federal and provincial governments was initiated in 2016-17. The evaluation and the program performance will be used to measure progress in the efficiency of the program and a subsequent evaluation is expected to be conducted in 2021, three years after proposed new regulations would come into force in 2018.

Proposed amendments to the Health of Animals Regulations, Part XII, were pre-published in the Canada Gazette, Part I Footnote 1, for stakeholder feedback. The objective of the proposed amendments is to improve the well-being of animals during transportation, make the regulations more outcome-based and align them better with major trading partners and international standards. Interpretive guidance for regulated parties was also posted on the CFIA website for stakeholder feedback. Comments were received from over 11,000 respondents and are being analysed.

Engaging International Partners to Enhance Safety and Market Access

In May 2016, Canada expanded its zoning arrangement for foreign animal disease outbreaks with the United States by signing new arrangements with Australia and New Zealand. These arrangements are intended to manage biosecurity risks while minimizing trade disruptions in the event of a foreign animal disease outbreak in a participating country. They aim to support the continuation of safe trade from areas that remain free from the disease in accordance with the World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE) rules for safe trade and the application of other controls, such as product treatments, to address biosecurity risks.

Building Scientific Capacity and Partnerships to Support Decision-Making

Antimicrobial resistance is a global and evolving public health concern. The loss of effective antimicrobials is reducing our ability to protect Canadians from infectious diseases, with profound impacts on our healthcare system, global trade, agriculture, environment and health sectors. The CFIA played a key role in the consultation with all stakeholders including federal, provincial, territorial governments, veterinary community, academia, and industry, in support of the development, under the leadership of the Public Health Agency of Canada, of the pan-Canadian Framework on antimicrobial resistance and antimicrobial use. The CFIA also engaged with stakeholders on developing better surveillance and stewardship programs. To that end, several workshops and working groups have been organized or supported by the CFIA to bring key experts together to plan the path forward. In February 2017, Health Canada posted its intent to move medically important antimicrobials to the prescription drug list, with implementation anticipated for December 2018. To reflect these changes, the CFIA revised the compendium of medicating ingredient brochures and has consulted with select stakeholders including veterinary associations, the feed industry and veterinary drug sponsors. The compendium lists those medicating ingredients permitted by the Canadian regulations to be added to livestock feed and are an important tool used by both government and industry. The revised brochures will be posted when the prescription switch is implemented and will contain new label and use information that has been approved by Health Canada. Internationally, the CFIA participated in activities including in Codex and the World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE), to advance the global action on antimicrobial resistance.

To support a shared national vision for effective, responsive, and integrated animal health surveillance, the CFIA continued to coordinate the implementation of the Canadian Animal Health Surveillance System. This is a federal/provincial/territorial and industry collaborative effort to build a network of industry, veterinary associations, academia, provincial governments, and the federal government for animal health surveillance. The CFIA coordinates the network and participates in its activities. Initiated in January 2015, the system has established the following:

In 2016-17, the system continued to strengthen animal health surveillance and enhance the CFIA's ability to respond to emergencies by forming surveillance network groups for swine, poultry, equine, dairy cattle and antimicrobial usage on farm. These groups are meeting regularly, supporting animal health, public health and market access through the sharing of information and developing surveillance projects. This collaborative approach is supporting improved information sharing and an increase in coordinated surveillance activities.

Under the umbrella of the Canadian Health Surveillance System, the Community for Emerging and Zoonotic Disease was established on April 1, 2016. It began a two-year implementation phase, in collaboration with Public Health Agency of Canada, industry, and the animal, public, and environmental health communities. This community is a virtual network that enables multidisciplinary experts to access and analyze information to produce early warning for emerging animal and zoonotic diseases. This virtual network supports Canada's disease prevention, preparedness and response capabilities through collaborative analysis and generation of strategic information.

Both the Canadian Animal Health Surveillance System and the Community for Emerging Zoonotic Diseases exemplify many of the values in the Plant and Animal Health Strategy which focuses on collaboration among federal, provincial, territorial and industry partners in animal health. The Strategy is further discussed under the "Partnering with Provincial and Territorial Governments" section in the Plant Resources Program.

Enhancing Service Excellence to Facilitate Market Access

The CFIA and the United States Department of Agriculture-Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service have implemented a pilot project to allow the use of electronically signed United States cattle export certificates in order to facilitate cattle imports from the United States to Canada. This project facilitates cattle and bison import transactions through four western Canadian/United States ports of entry:

The new process has eliminated the requirement of presenting the original copy of the endorsed export certificate when crossing the United States/Canadian border. Implementation of this process allows for a more efficient and streamlined service for cattle and bison imports from the United States to Canada.

Responses to Emergency Events

In 2016-17, the CFIA responded to a number of animal disease events, including viral hemorrhagic septicemia, a deadly, infectious fish disease, in wild Atlantic herring harvested off the east coast of Canada; low pathogenic avian influenza involving one flock of approximately 14,000 ducks in Ontario; whirling disease, an infectious fatal disease in wild finfish; and bovine tuberculosis in Alberta. For more details on these events, please refer to the Supplementary Information section of this report.

Results achieved
Expected results Performance indicators Target Date to achieve target 2016-17
Actual results
2015-16 Actual
results
2014-15 Actual
results
Risks to Canadians from the transmission of animal diseases to humans are minimized Number of reportable animal diseases that have entered into Canada via specified regulated pathways 0 March 31, 2017 0 0 0
Percentage of cases where investigations were completed following the positive identification of a reportable zoonotic disease 100% March 31, 2017 100% 100% 100%
Domestic and imported animals and animal products are compliant with Canadian regulations and international agreements Percentage of legally exported animal and animal product shipments destined for foreign markets that meet certification requirements 99% March 31, 2017 100% 100% 100%
Canada's status on the OIE disease risk status lists remains either "free, controlled risk, or negligible risk" Status maintained March 31, 2017 Status maintained Status maintained Status maintained
Risks to the Canadian animal resource base are mitigated Percentage of cases where investigations were completed following the positive identification of a reportable animal disease 100% March 31, 2017 100% 100% 100%
Effective preparedness to prevent, control, and eradicate transboundary diseases and emerging diseases Manuals for CFIA officials are updated as needed 100% of all necessary manual updates are completed March 31, 2017 32% of necessary manual updates were completedFootnote 4 75% of necessary manual updates were completed 33% of necessary manual updates were completed
Number of emergency preparedness simulation exercises and drills in which CFIA participates 9 March 31, 2017 8Footnote 5 11 23
Disease outbreaks in Canada are promptly and effectively responded to Percentage of detections of reportable transboundary diseases and significant emerging diseases in which an investigation was commenced in a timely fashion 100% March 31, 2017 100% 100% 100%
Percentage of cases where CFIA communicated with key stakeholders in a timely fashion following the confirmation of a transboundary or significant emerging disease 100% March 31, 2017 100% 100% 100%

CFIA performance targets were set to be achieved on a long-term basis in support of the expected results. The CFIA monitors progress to achieve the targets and adjusts as appropriate.

For details on past performance and lessons learned for the Animal Health and Zoonotics indicators that did not meet their target, please refer to the relevant section in past departmental performance reports:

The following tables present the Animal Health and Zoonotic Program's planned and actual spending and full-time equivalents for 2016-17.

Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2016-17
Main Estimates
2016-17
Planned spending
2016-17
Total authorities available for use
2016-17
Actual spending
(authorities used)
2016-17
Difference
(actual minus planned)
137,163,044 138,055,855 187,159,735 173,246,450 35,190,595

The variance of $49.1 million between Planned Spending and Total Authorities is mainly related to statutory payments to compensate Canadians, in accordance with the appropriate regulations, for animals ordered destroyed for the purpose of disease control.

The variance of $13.9 million between Total Authorities and Actual Spending is mainly due to: cost savings related to the delivery of the Federal Infrastructure Initiative; lapses required to fund specific Government-wide initiatives; and funds being transferred to the next fiscal year to support anticipated payments related to collective bargaining settlements.

Human resources (full-time equivalents)

2016-17
Planned
2016-17
Actual
2016-17
Difference
(actual minus planned)
1,023 975 (48)

Full-time equivalents were impacted by the requirement for the CFIA to absorb the ongoing cost increases associated with collective bargaining settlement negotiations, resulting from a Government-wide freeze on departmental operating budgets for 2014-15 and 2015-16. Due to the timing of the preparation of the 2016-17 Report on Plans and Priorities, this adjustment was not accounted for in the Planned Spending.

Supporting information on results financial and human resources relating to CFIA's lower-level programs is available on the TBS InfoBase and on the Canadian Food Inspection Agency's website.

Plant Resources Program

Description

The Plant Resources Program aims to mitigate risks to Canada's plant resource base, which is integral to a safe and accessible food supply, as well as to public health and environmental sustainability. The program achieves its objectives by regulating agricultural and forestry products; mitigating risks to the plant resource base (including crops and forests) from regulated pests and diseases; regulating the safety and integrity of seeds, fertilizers and plant products; and managing plant health emergencies and incidents. The program also guards against deliberate threats to the plant resource base, facilitates the introduction of emerging plant technologies and protects the rights of plant breeders. Achieving the objectives of the program instills confidence in Canada's plants, plant production systems and plant products, and contributes to the health of Canada's plant resources.

Plant Resources Program. Description follows.
Description for image: Plant Resources Program

At the top of the image there are three boxes/shapes in a row.

The first box says:

  • Program

The second box says:

  • Expected Results

The third box says:

  • Government of Canada (GoC) Outcome Area

Under this row, there is a second row with an additional three boxes.

The first box is placed directly under the Program box. It says:

  • Plant Resources Program

There is an arrow from this box, pointing to the second box, which is directly below the "Expected Results" box.

It says:

  • Risks to the Canadian plant resource base from imported plants and plant products are mitigated
  • Domestic plants and plant products are compliant with Canadian regulations and international agreements
  • Confirmed introductions of quarantine pests in Canada are contained and risk-mitigated (e.g. through the issuance of Notices of Prohibition of Movement, Quarantine, up to and including the issuance of Ministerial Orders)
  • Canadian exports of plants and plant products meet the country of destination regulatory requirements and Canada's reputation is maintained

There is an arrow from this box, pointing to the third box, which is directly below the "Government of Canada (GoC) Outcome Area" box, that says:

  • Strong economic Growth
  • A Clean and Healthy Environment

The last row has one box which identifies the Key Risk Areas. It says:

  • Inspection Effectiveness
  • Scientific Capability
  • Legislative, Regulatory and Program Framework
  • Transparency and Leveraging Partnerships

Did you know …?

In 2016-17 the CFIA:

  • Signed a new agreement with Australia for the export of untreated sawn wood from Canada, worth over $40 million annually;
  • Successfully negotiated access to the European Union for Canadian kiln drying for ash lumber, worth $76 million annually; and
  • Expanded regulated areas for emerald ash borer to include the city of Thunder Bay and the municipalités Régionales de Comtés of Joliette and D'Autray in Quebec.

Did you know …?

Canada's leadership in international plant protection received recognition in May 2016 with the election of one of CFIA's leading experts on international phytosanitary standards, to the Bureau of the Commission on Phytosanitary Measures. The Commission on Phytosanitary Measures is the governing body of the International Plant Protection Convention. The seven-member Bureau provides guidance to the Commission on Phytosanitary Measures on the strategic direction, financial and operational management of its activities.

Results

Building Scientific Capacity and Partnerships to Support Decision-Making

The CFIA worked with the United States Department of Agriculture's Animal and Plant Health Inspection Services to further reinforce our strong agricultural ties and better align Canada's regulatory requirements with the United States. This work helps to maintain the regular flow of pest-free goods across the Canada/United States border, thus protecting the Canadian economy and environment. The work also contributes to strategies used at the North American perimeter to keep plant pests from affecting North America's crops, forests and environment.

Partnering with Provincial and Territorial Governments

In July 2016, a Federal-Provincial-Territorial Emergency Management Framework, referred to as the Framework, was endorsed by the Federal-Provincial-Territorial Ministers of Agriculture. This set the stage for partnering to create a Plant and Animal Health Strategy for Canada, along with planning for implementing short-term activities for the framework.

The Plant and Animal Health Strategy was co-created by federal, provincial and territorial governments, academia, industry and others who play a role in plant and animal health. These stakeholders share a goal of strengthening Canada's approach to protecting plant and animal health through better collaboration among partners, innovation, and a focus on risk prevention. Both CFIA and Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada have worked with the provinces/territories and industry to develop early activities for implementing the Strategy.

A national plant and animal health planning forum held in December 2016 discussed the future of plant and animal health, planned and prioritized actions to enhance plant and animal health in Canada, and identified multi-stakeholder volunteers to participate in working groups to further develop the plant and animal health strategy.

Results achieved
Expected results Performance indicators Target Date to achieve target 2016-17
Actual results
2015-16 Actual
results
2014-15 Actual
results
Risks to the Canadian plant resource base from imported plants and plant products are mitigated Number of regulated foreign plant pests that enter into Canada through regulated pathways and establish themselves 0 March 31, 2017 1Footnote 6 0 0
Domestic plants and plants products are compliant with Canadian regulations and international agreements Percentage of domestic seed, crop inputs and plants with novel traits in compliance with Canadian regulations and international agreements 90% March 31, 2017 93.2% 96.16% 98%
Confirmed introductions of quarantine pests in Canada are contained and risk-mitigated (e.g. through the issuance of Notices of Prohibition of Movement, Quarantine, up to and including the issuance of Ministerial Orders) Percentage of confirmed introductions of quarantine pests for which notices are issued 100% March 31, 2017 100% 100% 100%
Percentage of notices issued in a timely manner 90% March 31, 2017 100% 100% 100%
Canadian exports of plants and plant products meet the country of destination regulatory requirements and Canada's reputation is maintained Percentage of certified plants and plant products shipment (lots) that meet the country of destination phytosanitary import requirements 99% March 31, 2017 99.73% 99% 99.7%

CFIA performance targets are set to be achieved on a long term basis in support of the expected results. The CFIA monitors progress to achieve the targets and adjusts as appropriate.

The following tables present the Plant Resources Program's planned and actual spending and full-time equivalents for 2016-17.

Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2016-17
Main Estimates
2016-17
Planned spending
2016-17
Total authorities available for use
2016-17
Actual spending
(authorities used)
2016-17
Difference
(actual minus planned)
93,368,850 93,894,697 92,892,965 79,435,589 (14,459,108)

The variance of $1.0 million between Planned Spending and Total Authorities mainly results from an in-year technical adjustment.

The variance of $13.5 million between Total Authorities and Actual Spending is mainly due to: cost savings related to the delivery of the Federal Infrastructure Initiative; lapses required to fund specific Government-wide initiatives; and funds being transferred to the next fiscal year to support anticipated payments related to collective bargaining settlements.

Human resources (full-time equivalents)
2016-17 Planned 2016-17 Actual 2016-17
Difference (actual minus planned)
756 695 (61)

Full-time equivalents were impacted by the requirement for the CFIA to absorb the ongoing cost increases associated with collective bargaining settlement negotiations, resulting from a Government-wide freeze on departmental operating budgets for 2014-15 and 2015-16. Due to the timing of the preparation of the 2016-17 Report on Plans and Priorities, this adjustment was not accounted for in the Planned Spending.

Supporting information on results financial and human resources relating to CFIA's lower-level programs is available on the TBS InfoBase and on the Canadian Food Inspection Agency's website.

International Collaboration and Technical Agreements

Description

The Canadian Food Inspection Agency's International Collaboration and Technical Agreements program contributes to a coherent, predictable, and science-based international regulatory framework that facilitates meeting regulatory requirements of importing countries' food, animals, and plants, and their products, resulting in the facilitation of multi-billion dollar trade for the Canadian economy. The program achieves its objectives through active participating in international fora for the development of international science-based rules, standards, guidelines and policies and the management of sanitary and phytosanitary committees established under international agreements. The CFIA's active promotion of the Canadian science-based regulatory system with foreign trading partners and negotiations to resolve scientific and technical issues contribute to market access.

International Collaboration and Technical Agreements. Description follows.
Description for image: International Collaboration and Technical Agreements

At the top of the image there are three boxes/shapes in a row.

The first box says:

  • Program

The second box says:

  • Expected Results

The third box says:

  • Government of Canada (GoC) Outcome Area

Under this row, there is a second row with an additional three boxes.

The first box is placed directly under the Program box. It says:

  • International Collaboration and Technical Agreements

There is an arrow from this box, pointing to the second box, which is directly below the "Expected Results" box.

It says:

  • Canadian interests are reflected in science-based international rules, standards, Free Trade Agreements, and technical arrangements through effective participation in sanitary and phytosanitary (SPS) negotiations and international Standards Setting Bodies (ISSB) such as Codex, OIE, and IPPC
  • International markets are accessible to Canadian food, animals, plants and their products
  • International regulatory cooperation, relationship building and technical assistance activities that are in line with the CFIA's mandate

There is an arrow from this box, pointing to the third box, which is directly below the "Government of Canada (GoC) Outcome Area" box, that says:

  • A Fair and Secure Marketplace
  • A Prosperous Canada through Global Commerce

The last row has one box which identifies the Key Risk Areas. It says:

  • Scientific Capability
  • Legislative, Regulatory and Program Framework
  • Transparency and Leveraging Partnerships

Results

Did you know …?

This year, the CFIA successfully chaired the 43rd Session of the Codex Committee on Food Labelling, which is hosted by Canada.

This committee successfully advanced the development of draft guidance on the date marking of pre-packaged foods.

In 2016-17, the CFIA advanced priorities in the international and technical agreements program related to international standards and rules, regulatory cooperation, technical assistance, market access, and free-trade agreements.

International Rules and Standards

To promote the development of science-based international standards consistent with Canada's regulatory framework and Government of Canada objectives, the CFIA led Canada's participation at the International Plant Protection Convention, the World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE); and, with Health Canada, co-led Canada's participation at the Codex Alimentarius Commission.

To provide scientific support for the development of international standards, the CFIA enhanced its engagement in international standards-setting bodies by embedding Canadian technical experts in the World Organization for Animal Health (OIE), the International Plant Protection Convention, and the Food and Agriculture Organization's food safety and quality unit. Notably, the Canadian expert working in the International Plant Protection Convention is managing the development of a globally harmonized tool (e-phyto) to facilitate the adoption and exchange of electronic phytosanitary certificates between trading countries.

In 2016-17, Canada underwent the most comprehensive evaluation of its veterinary services to date. The evaluation was conducted by the World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE). The CFIA led the coordination of the evaluation at the federal, provincial/territorial level and, where relevant, with Canadian stakeholders. This evaluation plays an essential role in maintaining international confidence in Canada's domestic systems for animal health and animal welfare, and provides valuable feedback on areas of improvement for animal health. A final report will be available in 2017-18, outlining how Canada meets international veterinary standards and providing recommendations for improvement.

Regulatory Cooperation

The CFIA continued its active engagement with foreign counterparts in many countries, including the United States, Mexico, China, the European Union, and India in order to strengthen and expand partnerships to help manage risks before they arrive at the Canadian border, and share/learn best regulatory practices and advance food safety, animal health and plant health objectives.

In particular:

Technical Assistance

The CFIA provided technical assistance by:

Market Access Support

In 2016-17, the CFIA continued to promote the Canadian science-based regulatory system with counterparts in key trading countries, negotiated import and export conditions and resolved technical issues to expand or maintain access to markets. This was achieved with CFIA's specialists in Canada and abroad, resulting in the resolution of 64 market access issues, including the following:

Results achieved
Expected results Performance indicators Target Date to achieve target 2016-17
Actual results
2015-16 Actual
results
2014-15 Actual
results
Canadian interests are reflected in science-based international rules, standards, Free Trade Agreements, and technical arrangements through effective participation in sanitary and phytosanitary negotiations and International Standards Setting Bodies such as Codex, OIE, and IPPC Number of key sanitary and phytosanitary negotiations and international standards setting bodies meetings where the CFIA promoted Canada's interests 36 March 31, 2017 36 38 43
International markets are accessible to Canadian food, animals, plants and their products Number of unjustified non-tariff barriers resolved 45 March 31, 2017 64Footnote 7 57 40
International regulatory cooperation, relationship building and technical assistance activities that are in line with the CFIA's mandate Number of senior level CFIA-led committees with foreign regulatory counterparts 4 March 31, 2017 4 6 7
Number of CFIA-led technical assistance activities provided to foreign national governments 8 March 31, 2017 16Footnote 8 11 13

The following tables present the International Collaboration and Technical Agreement Program's planned and actual spending and full-time equivalents for 2016-17.

Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2016-17
Main Estimates
2016-17
Planned spending
2016-17
Total authorities available for use
2016-17
Actual spending
(authorities used)
2016-17
Difference
(actual minus planned)
31,045,476 35,727,492 35,227,611 31,229,287 (4,498,205)

The variance of $4.0 million between Total Authorities and Actual Spending is mainly the result of funds being transferred to the next fiscal year to support anticipated payments related to collective bargaining settlements and lapses required to fund specific Government-wide initiatives.

Human resources (full-time equivalents)
2016-17 Planned 2016-17 Actual 2016-17
Difference (actual minus planned)
343 295 (48)

Full-time equivalents were impacted by the requirement for the CFIA to absorb the ongoing cost increases associated with collective bargaining settlement negotiations, resulting from a Government-wide freeze on departmental operating budgets for 2014-15 and 2015-16. Due to the timing of the preparation of the 2016-17 Report on Plans and Priorities, this adjustment was not accounted for in the Planned Spending.

Supporting information on results financial and human resources relating to CFIA's lower-level programs is available on the TBS InfoBase and on the Canadian Food Inspection Agency's website.

Internal Services

Description

Internal Services are those groups of related activities and resources that the federal government considers to be services in support of programs and/or required to meet corporate obligations of an organization. Internal Services refers to the activities and resources of the 10 distinct service categories that support program delivery in the organization, regardless of the Internal Services delivery model in a department. The 10 service categories are: Management and Oversight Services, Communications Services, Legal Services, Human Resources Management Services, Financial Management Services, Information Management Services, Information Technology Services, Real Property Services, Materiel Services, and Acquisition Services.

Results

In 2014-15, the CFIA developed a three-year plan for increasing internal awareness about privacy protection and developing a suite of policy tools to assist managers and staff in their day-to-day activities. In 2016-17, the CFIA worked on implementing, in two phases, the framework for privacy compliance measurement. This framework will provide a self-assessment tool for the various Agency programs and the Chief Privacy Officer.

Digital Communications

During 2016-17, the CFIA put effort into executing its digital communications implementation plan. The Agency has taken a "digital by default" approach and developed new products to support the organization's message, including innovative infographics and multiple videos. The Agency also developed a new corporate look, launched in February 2017. The new look represents the core of the Agency, while at the same time modernizing the way it presents itself. The new corporate look is aligned with Treasury Board Secretariat's federal identity program, which allows the public and stakeholders to easily recognize the CFIA. This consistent visual identity is important in today's digital world where communications products span many different platforms and media.

The CFIA increased its social media presence by launching a new YouTube channel in September 2016 and developing a strategy for targeted food recalls. This medium helped the Agency reach new audiences and open the conversation with Canadians, resulting in an increase of 42% of CFIA followers on its social media platforms.

The CFIA completed a pilot for the implementation of the e-Retrieval project to optimize access to information services within the Agency, reduce time and cost associated with the retrieval of electronic documents and to provide better service to clients while ensuring compliance with legislative deadlines.

Enhancing Investment Planning and Project Management

In 2016-17, the CFIA continued to enhance its investment planning management control. The Agency improved oversight and management of the investment planning practices by putting in place a more responsive regime that promotes sound stewardship, value for money and alignment with priorities. The CFIA continued the development of its business model with increased focus on client experience and how we structure our business to provide further strategic influence and operational guidance on the investment planning regime in future years. The Agency also completed and implemented its investment planning performance measurement framework.

To continue to improve its project management maturity, the CFIA is exploring the application of portfolio project management and program project management principles within our enterprise project management framework. The evaluation called for adjustments to the framework and governance model.

The Agency finalized its program for competency in project management, which will be implemented in phases over a three-year period, by aligning it to the Government of Canada direction on competencies in project management. The program proposes three pillars of competencies and four streams of project management levels. The launch of the program is expected in 2017-18. These advances will enhance CFIA's competencies in project management and efficiency and will lead to more value for taxpayers' money.

Modernizing and Consolidating Information Technology Applications to Enhance Service and Efficiency

As part of the Government of Canada community, the Agency must support many initiatives focusing on the standardization and centralization of IT applications, including the email transformation initiative and Shared Services Canada data center migration. During 2016-17, application and device readiness activities within the Agency have continued in advance of the move to the new email service of Microsoft Outlook. The planning for the Shared Services Canada data center migration and the workload migration from Windows 2003 servers has continued this fiscal year.

As part of the Government of Canada direction for standardization management of information holdings, the CFIA has been developing products required to transition our document management system to the common Government of Canada documents management system.

Did you know …?

The CFIA has posted an annual progress report on Blueprint 2020 on YouTube?

Human Resources

The CFIA continued to support the Blueprint 2020 (BP2020) vision of creating and maintaining a world-class public service equipped to serve Canada and Canadians. The Agency focused its efforts in areas relating to recruitment, fostering a respectful workforce, and innovation. Activities during the reporting period included outreach to Indigenous communities via an Indigenous recruitment video and on-campus recruitment; continuation of the HOPE peer support (mental health) program; and the launch of "Ask CFIA," an online portal to respond to inquiries from regulated parties.

Training in values and ethics continued to be a mandatory requirement for all new employees. It is part of our orientation program, as well as our prerequisite employment program and our program for the leadership development of supervisors. Regular communication to employees through our internal national information bulletins reminded employees of their value and ethics obligations and outlined the e-learning and in classroom training that was available to them. Values and Ethics Day, held on February 16, 2017, focused on raising awareness of internal support mechanisms and programs available to employees.

The CFIA identified trends and opportunities for continuous improvement within the Agency's collective staffing process. These opportunities entail addressing recommendations made by the Office of the Staffing Ombudsman, including conducting a risk assessment exercise. The role of that exercise is to identify high-, medium- and low-risk areas informing the staffing accountability matrix, policy suite and future monitoring program. In addition, the staffing framework policy has been updated, effective April 2016, and has been replaced with staffing and recruitment framework, staffing and recruitment policy, and specific staffing guidelines. The new policy suite includes clarification on roles, responsibilities and accountability for staffing.

The Agency has developed relations with post-secondary institutions to promote student career opportunities in the federal public service and the CFIA, and has established an online presence in the recruitment spheres.

Open Government Implementation

The Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat directive on open government, effective on October 9, 2014, requires that departments and agencies maximize the release of Government of Canada open data and open information. During 2016-17, the CFIA executed the Agency's open government implementation plan by completing a benchmarking scan of transparency and openness activities by domestic and international counterparts that identified best practices and areas for improvement. In addition, the Agency completed a revised transparency policy, which will provide direction for future transparency and openness activities.

The following tables present the Internal Services Program's planned and actual spending and full-time equivalents for 2016-17.

Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2016-17
Main Estimates
2016-17
Planned spending
2016-17
Total authorities available for use
2016-17
Actual spending
(authorities used)
2016-17
Difference
(actual minus planned)
113,578,857 113,999,756 139,270,484 133,431,955 19,432,199

The variance of $25.3 million between Planned Spending and Total Authorities mainly results from: the distribution of in-year authorities to facilitate the realignment of resources between Programs and Internal Services, ensuring compliance with the amended Treasury Board Guide on Recording and Reporting of Internal Services Expenditures; the renewal of sunsetting initiatives; and the addition of the Budget 2016 initiative Improve Food Safety for Canadians.

The variance of $5.8 million between Total Authorities and Actual Spending is mainly the result of funds being transferred to the next fiscal year to support anticipated payments related to collective bargaining settlements and lapses required to fund specific Government-wide initiative.

Human resources (full-time equivalents)
2016-17 Planned 2016-17 Actual 2016-17
Difference (actual minus planned)
749 916 167

The variance of 167 full-time equivalents (FTEs) is largely related to: the realignment of resources between Programs and Internal Services, in order to comply with the amended Treasury Board Guide on Recording and Reporting of Internal Services Expenditures; and in-year funding received for Treasury Board approved initiatives.

This increase was somewhat offset by the requirement for the CFIA to absorb the ongoing cost increases associated with collective bargaining settlement negotiations, resulting from a Government-wide freeze on departmental operating budgets for 2014-15 and 2015-16. Due to the timing of the preparation of the 2016-17 Report on Plans and Priorities, this adjustment was not accounted for in the Planned Spending.

Analysis of trends in spending and human resources

Actual expenditures

The tables presented in this section reflect the CFIA's historical spending levels from 2014-15 to 2016-17 and planned spending for the next three fiscal years (2017-18 to 2019-20). Planned spending excludes funding extensions that the Agency plans to pursue.

Sunsetting programs are subject to government decisions to extend, reduce or enhance funding.

The Agency will assess initiatives that are sunsetting and seek renewal, as required, to maintain and continuously improve Canada's strong food safety system, safe and accessible food supply, and plant and animal resource base. Following parliamentary approval, funding renewal decisions will be reflected in the Agency's budget authorities. Agency-level information, including anticipated renewal of sunsetting resources, can be found in the Departmental spending trend graph below.

Departmental spending trend graph

Departmental spending trend graph. Description follows.
Description for image: Departmental spending trend graph
Departmental spending trend graph
2014-15 2015-16 2016-17 2017-18 2018-19 2019-20
Sunset Programs - - - 35.8 43.2 80.1
Voted 667.2 595.1 624.4 582.4 520.8 485.4
Statutory 181.3 154.2 161.5 129.6 127.0 123.4
Total / Forecasted 848.5 749.4 785.9 747.9 691.0 688.8
FTEs 6,138 5,901 6,101 5,691 5,469 5,156
Sunset Programs - FTEs - - - 330 367 661
Total / Forecasted - FTEs 6,138 5,901 6,101 6,021 5,836 5,817
Budgetary performance summary for Programs and Internal Services (dollars)
Programs and Internal Services 2016-17
Main Estimates
2016-17
Planned spending
2017-18
Planned spending
2018-19
Planned spending
2016-17 Total authorities available for use 2016-17
Actual spending (authorities used)
2015-16 Actual spending (authorities used) 2014-15
Actual spending (authorities used)
Food Safety Program 364,582,938 365,461,365 349,600,493 302,688,731 418,590,945 368,568,579 376,113,531 421,520,442
Animal and Zoonotics Program 137,163,044 138,055,855 125,411,593 119,526,241 187,159,735 173,246,450 141,043,127 162,039,970
Plant Resources Program 93,368,850 93,894,697 78,664,213 76,076,780 92,892,965 79,435,589 79,807,062 90,262,195
International Collaboration and Technical Agreements 31,045,476 35,727,492 36,418,999 29,531,085 35,227,611 31,229,287 32,552,166 40,718,768
Subtotal 626,160,308 633,139,409 590,095,298 527,822,837 733,871,256 652,479,905 629,515,886 714,541,375
Internal Services 113,578,857 113,999,756 121,954,294 119,943,910 139,270,484 133,431,955 119,846,641 133,951,514
Total 739,739,165 747,139,165 712,049,592 647,766,747 873,141,740 785,911,860 749,362,527 848,492,889

Actual human resources

Human resources summary for Programs and Internal Services (full-time equivalents)
Programs and Internal Services 2014-15
Actual
2015-16
Actual
2016-17
Actual
2016-17 Planned 2017-18 Planned 2018-19 Planned
Food Safety Program 3,250 3,155 3,220 3,116 2,890 2,732
Animal and Zoonotics Program 1,012 959 975 1,023 942 929
Plant Resources Program 737 703 695 756 688 678
International Collaboration and Technical Agreements 335 307 295 343 310 277
Subtotal 5,334 5,124 5,185 5,238 4,830 4,616
Internal Services 804 777 916 749 861 853
Total 6,138 5,901 6,101 5,987 5,691 5,469

The CFIA saw increased spending in 2014-15, due to substantial one-time disbursements related to government-wide salary initiatives. As well, the Agency ratified all outstanding collective agreements. This resulted in significant one-time retroactive salary settlement payments and ongoing cost increases of approximately $30 million annually, which the CFIA absorbed. Given that 80% of the CFIA's annual operating expenditures support personnel costs, limited flexibility existed to realign non-personnel authorities. As a result, the Agency saw a decline in its full-time equivalents (FTE) complement in 2015-16.

The CFIA will also be required to absorb the retroactive and ongoing costs of upcoming collective agreement salary settlements related to fiscal years 2014-15 and 2015-16, resulting from a Government-wide freeze on departmental operating budgets for these two fiscal years. Consequently, the Agency has included the estimated impacts of these upcoming costs on planned human resources for 2017-18 and future years.

2016-17 Total Authorities Available for Use reflects additional in-year funding received for Treasury Board approved initiatives, statutory payment reimbursement, and other in-year adjustments. This in-year funding totalled $126.0 million, mainly consisting of: the renewal of sunsetting initiatives; funds transferred into 2016-17 from the previous fiscal year; and statutory payments made to compensate Canadians for plants or animals ordered destroyed for the purpose of disease control.

The $87.2 million difference between total authorities and actual spending primarily relates to: the shifting of funds from 2016-17 to the next fiscal year for the Federal Infrastructure Initiative and Electronic Service Delivery Platform; funds strategically lapsed for carry forward into 2017-18 to support the anticipated impacts of collective bargaining settlements; cost savings related to the delivery of the Federal Infrastructure Initiative; and lapses required to fund specific Government-wide initiatives.

Expenditures by vote

For information on the Canadian Food Inspection Agency's organizational voted and statutory expenditures, consult the Public Accounts of Canada 2017.

Alignment of spending with the whole-of-government framework

Alignment of 2016-17 actual spending with the whole-of-government framework (dollars)
Program Spending area Government of Canada activity 2016-17 Actual spending
Food Safety Program Social Affairs Healthy Canadians 368,568,579
Animal and Zoonotics Program Social Affairs Healthy Canadians 173,246,450
Plant Resources Program Economic Affairs A clean and healthy environment 79,435,589
International Collaboration and Technical Agreements International Affairs A prosperous Canada through global commerce 31,229,287
Total spending by spending area (dollars)
Spending area Total planned spending Total actual spending
Economic affairs 93,894,697 79,435,589
Social affairs 503,517,220 541,815,029
International affairs 35,727,492 31,229,287

Financial statements and financial statements highlights

Financial statements

The Canadian Food Inspection Agency's financial statements [unaudited] for the year ended March 31, 2017, are available on the departmental website.

Financial statements highlights

Condensed Statement of Operations (unaudited) for the year ended March 31, 2017 (dollars)
Financial information 2016-17
Planned
results
2016-17
Actual
2015-16
Actual
Difference (2016-17 actual minus 2016-17 planned) Difference (2016-17 actual minus 2015-16 actual)
Total expenses 821,591 868,543 817,882 46,952 50,661
Total revenues 52,610 53,787 53,104 1,177 683
Net cost of operations before government funding and transfers 768,981 814,756 764,778 45,775 49,978
Condensed Statement of Financial Position (unaudited) as at March 31, 2017 (dollars)
Financial Information 2016-17 2015-16 Difference
(2016-17 minus
2015-16)
Total net liabilities 171,912 145,217 26,695
Total net financial assets 98,051 80,240 17,811
Departmental net debt 73,861 64,977 8,884
Total non-financial assets 189,067 178,223 10,844
Departmental net financial position 115,206 113,246 1,960

Supplementary information

Corporate information

Organizational profile

Appropriate minister: The Honourable Ginette Petitpas Taylor, PC, MP

Institutional head: Paul Glover

Ministerial portfolio: Health

Enabling instruments:

CFIA Wide

Food Safety

Plant and Animal Health

Plant

Animal Health

Year of incorporation / commencement: 1997

Reporting framework

The Canadian Food Inspection Agency's Strategic Outcome and Program Alignment Architecture (PAA) of record for 2017-18 are shown below:

Strategic Outcome. Description follows.
Description for image: Strategic Outcome

The image is composed of two large boxes/shapes, one on top of the other.

The top box says:

  • Strategic Outcome: A safe and accessible food supply and plant and animal resource base

The bottom box has multiple smaller boxes within, arranged in five columns. The first row of each column are programs. The boxes below the first row are sub-programs.

The first box of the first column says:

  • Food Safety Program

There are seven sub-program boxes below the "Food Safety Program" box, and they say:

  • Meat & Poultry;
  • Egg;
  • Dairy;
  • Fish & Seafood;
  • Fresh Fruit & Vegetables;
  • Processed Products; and
  • Imported and Manufactured Food Products.

The first box of the second column says:

  • Animal Health and Zoonotics Program

There are three sub-program boxes below the "Animal Health and Zoonotics Program" box, and they say:

  • Terrestrial Animal Health;
  • Aquatic Animal Health; and
  • Feed.

The first box of the third column says:

  • Plant Resources Program

There are four sub-program boxes below the "Plant Resources Program" box, and they say:

  • Plant Protection;
  • Seed;
  • Fertilizer; and
  • Intellectual Property Rights.

The fourth column only has one box and it says:

  • International Collaboration and Technical Agreements

The first box of the fifth column says:

  • Internal Services

There are ten sub-program boxes below the "Internal Services" box, and they say:

  • Management and Oversight;
  • Communications;
  • Legal;
  • Human Resources Management;
  • Financial Management;
  • Information Management;
  • Information Technology;
  • Real Property Management;
  • Materiel Management; and
  • Acquisition Management.

Supporting information on lower-level programs

Supporting information on results financial and human resources relating to CFIA's lower-level programs is also available on the TBS InfoBase and on the Canadian Food Inspection Agency website.

Supplementary information tables:

2016-17 Departmental Results Report

Supporting information on lower-level programs

Sub-Program 1.1.1: Meat and Poultry

The meat and poultry sub-program aims to mitigate risks associated with meat and poultry and their products that are produced in Canada's federally registered establishments or imported for consumption. The sub-program achieves its objectives by verifying that meat, poultry and their products meet health and safety requirements through verification of compliance with the relevant governing acts and regulations. The sub-program also helps to mitigate unfair market practices related to labelling compliance for pre-packaged meat products, and audits the delivery of a grading program based on objective meat quality and retail yield standards. The meat and poultry sub-program supports confidence in Canada's meat and poultry and their products.

Results

Inspection Modernization to Enhance Food Safety and Market Access

As part of the modernized slaughter inspection program, the CFIA continued to engage with the United States Department of Agriculture's Food Safety and Inspection Service, as well as with new competent authorities in Australia and New Zealand. For example, the Agency learned more about other countries' best practices for slaughter by visiting different competent authorities and key stakeholders in both Australia and New Zealand. To learn more about the United States' inspection models project being implemented in five of their hog-slaughter facilities, the Agency also performed an on-site assessment with United States Department of Agriculture partners.

Based on the results of those visits, the CFIA completed an initial review of the different inspection models, resulting in the development of a new draft policy for a modernized inspection system in hog-slaughter plants. This modernized system will continue to maintain Canada's high level of food safety and allow inspectors to focus more on oversight, rather than performing production-line tasks that are the industry's responsibility. This allows the CFIA to reallocate resources to areas of greater risk, thus supporting increased food safety.

As part of the consistency component of modernized slaughter inspection program, the CFIA updated its policies on red-meat condemnation. The objective is to be more outcome-based, food safety-focused and recognized by our major trading partners. A new catalogue, refined in 2016-17, will be ready for roll out in 2017-18. This new interactive electronic tool will make it easier for veterinarians in slaughter plants to assess diseases on food animals and carcasses that may impact food safety.

Building Scientific Capacity and Partnerships to Support Decision-Making

The CFIA has posted on its external website a report of the 2012-13 microbiological baseline study in broiler chicken. A joint working group of federal/provincial/territorial governments and industry will use the report to develop national risk management strategies for the control of salmonella and campylobacter in poultry.

The Agency also completed a pilot report on a microbiological baseline study of ready-to-eat foods and shared it with federal/provincial/territorial partners and industry. The study showed that the system in place for sample collection, analysis and reporting is generally suitable for a 12-month study. As such, work began on designing a 12-month microbiological baseline study on beef carcasses.

The Agency developed a policy for reducing pathogens in poultry meat, and initiated consultation with the regulated parties, other federal and provincial regulators to receive feedback. After consultation, the CFIA expects federal meat establishments to follow established standards on pathogen reduction and to use these standards as performance indicators to assess control of operational hygiene during slaughtering. Such standards will also assure control over the level of foodborne pathogens.

The CFIA will continue to participate in the work of the joint United States-Canada initiatives of the Beyond the Border and Regulatory Cooperation Council, focusing on meat related issues.

Results achieved
Expected results Performance indicators Target Date to achieve target 2016-17 Actual results 2015-16 Actual results 2014-15 Actual results
Federally registered meat and poultry establishments meet federal regulations Percentage of inspected federally registered meat and poultry establishments in compliance with federal regulations 98% March 31, 2017 97.5% 96.22% 97%
Meat and poultry products for domestic consumption meet federal regulations Percentage of tested domestic meat and poultry products in compliance with federal regulations 95% March 31, 2017 97.91% 99.00% 98.7%
Meat and poultry products for domestic consumption meet federal regulations Percentage of tested imported meat and poultry products in compliance with federal regulations 95% March 31, 2017 98.1% 99.00% 98.7%

CFIA performance targets are set to be achieved on a long-term basis in support of the expected results. The CFIA monitors progress to achieve the targets and adjusts as appropriate.

The following tables present the meat and poultry sub-program's planned and actual spending and full-time equivalents for 2016-17.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2016-17
Planned spending
2016-17
Actual spending (authorities used)
2016-17
Difference (actual minus planned)
176,049,929 202,702,398 26,652,469
Human resources (full-time equivalents)
2016-17 Planned 2016-17 Actual 2016-17
Difference (actual minus planned)
1,530 1,880 350

Sub-Program 1.1.2: Egg

The egg sub-program aims to mitigate risks associated with egg and egg products that are produced in Canada's federally registered establishments or imported for consumption. The sub-program achieves its objectives by verifying that eggs and egg products are graded according to relevant governing acts and regulations and that they comply with the requirements of the said acts and regulations. The sub-program also helps to mitigate unfair market practices by verifying that labelling and advertising practices meet the requirements for pre-packaged egg products. This sub-program supports confidence in Canada's egg and egg products.

Results

Regulatory Modernization to Enhance Safety and Efficiency

In 2016-17, the egg sub-program continued to evolve. Planning activities for inspections and sampling continued to be updated and prioritized in consideration of risk. The development of the CFIA's tool for managing programs and the single approach to inspection progressed towards broader risk-based planning and delivery approaches.

Results achieved
Expected results Performance indicators Target Date to achieve target 2016-17 Actual results 2015-16 Actual results 2014-15 Actual results
Federally registered shell egg establishments meet federal regulations Percentage of inspected federally registered shell egg establishments in compliance with federal regulations 98% March 31, 2017 98.25% 96.22% 97%
Shell egg and egg products for domestic consumption meet federal regulations Percentage of tested domestic shell egg and egg products in compliance with federal regulations 95% March 31, 2017 98.88% 99.00% 98.7%
Shell egg and egg products for domestic consumption meet federal regulations Percentage of tested imported shell egg and egg products in compliance with federal regulations 95% March 31, 2017 99.6% 99.00% 98.7%

CFIA performance targets are set to be achieved on a long-term basis in support of the expected results. The CFIA monitors progress to achieve the targets and adjusts as appropriate.

The following tables present the egg sub-program's planned and actual spending and full-time equivalents for 2016-17.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2016-17
Planned spending
2016-17
Actual spending (authorities used)
2016-17
Difference (actual minus planned)
9,674,342 7,545,949 (2,128,393)
Human resources (full-time equivalents)
2016-17 Planned 2016-17 Actual 2016-17
Difference (actual minus planned)
77 63 (14)

Sub-Program 1.1.3: Dairy

The dairy sub-program aims to mitigate risks associated with dairy and dairy products that are produced in Canada's federally registered establishments or imported for consumption. The sub-program achieves its objectives by verifying that dairy and dairy products meet health and safety requirements through verification of compliance with the governing acts and regulations. The sub-program also helps to mitigate unfair market practices by verifying that labelling for pre-packaged dairy products meets the requirements as set out in the acts and regulations. This sub-program supports confidence in Canada's dairy products.

Results

Regulatory Modernization to Enhance Safety and Efficiency

In 2016-17, the activities of the dairy sub-program continued to evolve. Inspections and sampling planning activities continued to be updated and prioritized in consideration of risk. Over the same period, development of the CFIA's tool for managing programs and the single inspection approach progressed towards broader risk-based planning and delivery approaches.

The dairy sub-program was involved in piloting several ongoing initiatives:

Results achieved
Expected results Performance indicators Target Date to achieve target 2016-17 Actual results 2015-16 Actual results 2014-15 Actual results
Federally registered dairy establishments meet federal regulations Percentage of inspected federally registered dairy establishments in compliance with federal regulations 98% March 31, 2017 98.86% 99.00% 98%
Dairy products for domestic consumption meet federal regulations Percentage of tested domestic dairy products in compliance with federal regulations 95% March 31, 2017 96.52% 97.94% 96.1%
Dairy products for domestic consumption meet federal regulations Percentage of tested imported dairy products in compliance with federal regulations 95% March 31, 2017 90.5%Footnote 9 88.54% 90.6%

CFIA performance targets are set to be achieved on a long-term basis in support of the expected results. The CFIA monitors progress to achieve the targets and adjusts as appropriate.

For details on past performance and lessons learned for the dairy sub-program indicators that did not meet their target, please refer to the relevant section in past Departmental Performance Reports:

The following tables present the dairy sub-program's planned and actual spending and full-time equivalents for 2016-17.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2016-17
Planned spending
2016-17
Actual spending (authorities used)
2016-17
Difference (actual minus planned)
15,352,392 12,717,299 (2,635,093)
Human resources (full-time equivalents)
2016-17 Planned 2016-17 Actual 2016-17
Difference (actual minus planned)
125 99 (26)

Sub-Program 1.1.4: Fish and Seafood

The fish and seafood sub-program aims to mitigate risks associated with fish and seafood products processed in Canada's federally registered establishments or imported for consumption. It achieves its objectives by developing product and process standards and ensuring that products, importers and domestic industry comply with quality, safety and identity of fish and seafood requirements through verification of compliance with the governing acts and regulations. This sub-program supports confidence in Canada's fish and seafood products.

Results

Regulatory Modernization to Enhance Safety and Efficiency

In 2016-17, the fish and seafood sub-program continued to evolve. The Agency continued to update and prioritize inspections and sampling planning activities in consideration of risk. In the same period, development of the CFIA's tool for program management and the single-inspection approach progressed towards broader risk-based planning and delivery approaches.

For example, as part of the ongoing roll-out of the single-inspection approach, the Agency revised the fish export certification program to align it with the goals of the single-food program.
"Ask CFIA" was launched in June 2016 for the dairy, fresh fruits and vegetables, and fish and seafood sectors. For more information, please refer to Section 1.1.

To maintain a working relationship with key trading partners such and China, Russia and the European Union, the CFIA continued its work to participate in international technical working groups.

As part of the initiative on inspection modernization, the Agency revised the fish export certification program through the creation of a food export certification - technical reference document, which will become supporting guidance once the Safe Food for Canadians Regulations comes into effect.

Results achieved
Expected results Performance indicators Target Date to achieve target 2016-17 Actual results 2015-16 Actual results 2014-15 Actual results
Federally registered fish and seafood establishments meet federal regulations Percentage of inspected federally registered fish and seafood establishments in compliance with federal regulations 98% March 31, 2017 97.23% 98.11% 98.7%
Fish and seafood products for domestic consumption meet federal regulations Percentage of tested domestic fish and seafood products in compliance with federal regulations 95% March 31, 2017 98.99% 97.61% 97.6%
Fish and seafood products for domestic consumption meet federal regulations Percentage of tested imported fish and seafood products in compliance with federal regulations 95% March 31, 2017 95.3% 87.89% 89%

CFIA performance targets are set to be achieved on a long-term basis in support of the expected results. The CFIA monitors progress to achieve the targets and adjusts as appropriate.

For details on past performance and lessons learned for the fish and seafood sub-program indicators that did not meet their target, please refer to the relevant section in past Departmental Performance Reports:

The following tables present the fish and seafood sub-program's planned and actual spending and full-time equivalents for 2016-17.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2016-17
Planned spending
2016-17
Actual spending (authorities used)
2016-17
Difference (actual minus planned)
66,832,526 60,132,530 (6,699,996)
Human resources (full-time equivalents)
2016-17 Planned 2016-17 Actual 2016-17
Difference (actual minus planned)
491 467 (24)

Sub-Program 1.1.5: Fresh Fruit and Vegetables

The fresh fruit and vegetables sub-program aims to mitigate risks associated with fresh fruits and vegetables and their products produced in Canada or imported for consumption. It achieves its objectives by verifying that products meet all stipulated health and safety requirements through verification of compliance with the relevant governing acts and regulations. This sub-program mitigates unfair market practices by verifying that labelling and net quantity requirements for pre-packaged fresh fruit and vegetable products are adhered to. This sub-program supports confidence in Canada's fresh fruit and vegetable products.

Results

Regulatory Modernization to Enhance Safety and Efficiency

"Ask CFIA" was first launched in June 2016 for the dairy, fresh fruits and vegetables, and fish and seafood sectors. For more information, please refer to Section 1.1.

In 2016-17, the fresh fruit and vegetables sub-program activities continued to evolve. Inspections and sampling planning activities continue to be updated and prioritized in consideration of risk, as development of the CFIA's tool for program management and the single-inspection approach progress towards broader risk-based planning and delivery approaches.

Results achieved
Expected results Performance indicators Target Date to achieve target 2016-17 Actual results 2015-16 Actual results 2014-15 Actual results
Federally registered fresh fruits and vegetables establishments meet federal regulations Percentage of inspected federally registered processed fresh fruit and vegetable establishments in compliance with federal regulations 98% March 31, 2017 100% 98.85% 90.9%
Fresh fruit and vegetable products for domestic consumption meet federal regulations Percentage of tested domestic fresh fruit and vegetable samples in compliance with federal regulations 95% March 31, 2017 99.10% 98.95% 98.8%
Fresh fruit and vegetable products for domestic consumption meet federal regulations Percentage of tested imported fresh fruits and vegetables samples in compliance with federal regulations 95% March 31, 2017 95.7% 96.83% 96.8%

CFIA performance targets are set to be achieved on a long-term basis in support of the expected results. The CFIA monitors progress to achieve the targets and adjusts as appropriate.

For details on past performance and lessons learned for the fresh fruit and vegetable sub-program indicators that did not meet their target, please refer to the relevant section in past Departmental Performance Reports:

The following tables present the fresh fruits and vegetables sub-program's planned and actual spending and full-time equivalents for 2016-17.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2016-17
Planned spending
2016-17
Actual spending (authorities used)
2016-17
Difference (actual minus planned)
38,588,926 27,393,187 (11,195,739)
Human resources (full-time equivalents)
2016-17 Planned 2016-17 Actual 2016-17
Difference (actual minus planned)
332 237 (95)

Sub-Program 1.1.6: Processed Products

The processed products sub-program aims to mitigate risks associated with processed products, including honey and maple products, which are produced in Canada or imported for consumption. The sub-program achieves its objectives by verifying that processed products comply with health and food safety requirements through verification of compliance with the relevant governing acts and regulations. This sub-program minimizes unfair market practices by verifying that labelling and net quantity requirements for pre-packaged processed products are adhered to. The sub-program supports confidence in Canada's processed products.

Results

Regulatory Modernization to Enhance Safety and Efficiency

In 2016-17, the processed products sub-program activities continued to evolve. The Agency continued to update and prioritize planning activities for inspections and sampling in consideration of risk. In the same period, development of the CFIA's tool for program management and the single inspection approach progressed towards broader risk-based planning and delivery approaches.

Results achieved
Expected results Performance indicators Target Date to achieve target 2016-17 Actual results 2015-16 Actual results 2014-15 Actual results
Federally registered processed products establishments meet federal regulations Percentage of inspected federally registered processed products establishments in compliance with federal regulations 98% March 31, 2017 98.97% 97.77% 96.8%
Processed products for domestic consumption meet federal regulations Percentage of tested domestic processed products in compliance with federal regulations 95% March 31, 2017 98.20% 98.12% 98.1%
Processed products for domestic consumption meet federal regulations Percentage of tested imported processed products in compliance with federal regulations 95% March 31, 2017 97.6% 96.98% 96.2%

CFIA performance targets are set to be achieved on a long-term basis in support of the expected results. The CFIA monitors progress to achieve the targets and adjusts as appropriate.

The following tables present the processed products sub-program's planned and actual spending and full-time equivalents for 2016-17.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2016-17
Planned spending
2016-17
Actual spending (authorities used)
2016-17
Difference (actual minus planned)
9,919,851 9,330,929 (588,922)
Human resources (full-time equivalents)
2016-17 Planned 2016-17 Actual 2016-17
Difference (actual minus planned)
92 80 (12)

Sub-Program 1.1.7: Imported and Manufactured Food Products

The imported and manufactured food products sub-program aims to mitigate risks associated with food commodities that are regulated by the relevant governing acts and regulations. The CFIA and provincial/territorial governments share the jurisdiction over imported and manufactured food products because the sector includes a large variety of foods that are traded intra-provincially or inter-provincially. This sub-program achieves its objectives by verifying that these products comply with the health, food safety, and consumer protection requirements. The sub-program mitigates unfair market practices by verifying that requirements related to net quantity, composition, claims, labelling, and advertising of these foods are adhered to and by enforcing the governing acts and regulations. Through enforcement of the acts and regulations, the sub-program supports confidence in Canada's imported and manufactured food products.

Results

Regulatory Modernization to Enhance Safety and Efficiency

In 2016-17, the imported and manufactured food products sub-program activities continued to evolve. Inspections and sampling planning activities continue to be updated and prioritized in consideration of risk, as development of the CFIA's tool for program management and the single inspection approach progress towards broader risk-based planning and delivery approaches.

Results achieved
Expected results Performance indicators Target Date to achieve target 2016-17 Actual results 2015-16 Actual results 2014-15 Actual results
Risks to the Canadian public associated with imported and manufactured food products are mitigated Percentage of major health risks in the imported and manufactured food sector that are addressed through the annual update to food safety inspection programs 95% March 31, 2017 100% 100% 100%
Risks to the Canadian public associated with imported and manufactured food products are mitigated Percentage of inspected imported and manufactured products with accurate net quantity, composition, labelling and advertising 70% March 31, 2017 72% 72.1% 73.1%

CFIA performance targets are set to be achieved on a long-term basis in support of the expected results. The CFIA monitors progress to achieve the targets and adjusts as appropriate.

The following tables present imported and manufactured food products sub-program's planned and actual spending and full-time equivalents for 2016-17.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2016-17
Planned spending
2016-17
Actual spending (authorities used)
2016-17
Difference (actual minus planned)
49,043,399 48,746,287 (297,112)
Human resources (full-time equivalents)
2016-17 Planned 2016-17 Actual 2016-17
Difference (actual minus planned)
469 394 (75)
Animal Health and Zoonotics Sub-Program Activity Summary

Sub-Program 1.2.1: Terrestrial Animal Health

The terrestrial animal health sub-program aims to prevent the entry of reportable, foreign animal diseases and the spread of reportable domestic animal diseases as set out in the relevant governing acts and regulations. This sub-program achieves its objectives by delivering initiatives that track, detect, and mitigate risks to the terrestrial animal resource base. This sub-program supports food safety, public health, and protection of the animal resource base, and instils national and international confidence in Canadian agricultural products. Through verification of compliance, this sub-program supports domestic and international confidence that Canada's animals are free from certain reportable diseases, particularly those potentially transmissible to humans. This sub-program uses funding from the following transfer payment: Statutory Compensation Payments.

Results

In July 2016, Canada experienced one limited outbreak of low pathogenic avian influenza involving one flock of approximately 14,000 ducks in Ontario. Working with the provincial authorities, the CFIA investigated and responded to the outbreak to eradicate the disease. On November 30, 2016, Canada declared that the avian influenza had been eradicated.

In September 2016, a case of bovine tuberculosis was confirmed in a cow from Alberta. The CFIA investigated the case at the farm of origin and implemented movement controls and eradication efforts. In addition, the CFIA began tracing and testing activities for all animals that left the farm of origin over the past years and for all herds that supplied animals to the farm of origin. Since the September 2016 outbreak, operational staff have been involved with the quarantine and on-farm testing of approximately 2,500 herds of cattle. CFIA laboratories continue to test samples that field staff have submitted from approximately 11,500 head of cattle. The investigation is expected to continue through 2017-18.

To support activities for market access, the CFIA successfully negotiated 30 new export certificates and amended or reactivated 56 certificates. These certificates allow the export of Canadian animals and animal products to the importing countries. The Government of Canada opened new markets that include the following:

This is the first time an export certificate has been finalized for bovine eggs, allowing Canada to keep pace with advancements in embryo production technology. Following the resolution of the outbreak of highly pathogenic avian influenza in Ontario in 2015, the CFIA concluded significant bilateral negotiations to re-open closed markets. Most of the markets, including large ones such as Mexico, Taiwan and Turkey, lifted restrictions on all avian commodities from Canada.

Enhancing Safety in Imported and Domestic Products

Canada currently has a controlled risk status for bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE), also known as mad cow disease and continues to work toward a final status of negligible risk for this disease with the World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE). Under the current World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE) criteria, Canada will be able to apply for negligible BSE risk status in the fall of 2019. The CFIA has continued to ensure the integrity of delivery of Canada's BSE control program by addressing specific areas for improvement. With this work, the Agency will be able to prepare Canada's future submission, in 2019, to the World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE) for negligible BSE risk status. A negligible BSE risk status represents an opportunity for expanded market access.

Work continues to address priority areas for improvement, including the expanded use of the surveillance data from Canadian Animal Health Surveillance Network for BSE. This is a nationwide network that draws on disease detection capabilities of practising veterinarians, provincial and university diagnostic laboratories and the federal government. The CFIA redesigned permits for specified risk materials to better track data. The Agency developed and delivered training provided to the trainers of federal and provincial staff who inspect the specified risk materials controls at non-federally registered cattle abattoirs.

The Agency collects information on livestock identification, movement, location and custodianship (i.e. traceability), in multiple information systems managed by responsible administrators on behalf of the CFIA and provincial governments. The CFIA's traceability national information portal is a single window through which authorized users can access information on livestock traceability collected in the different information systems. To further enhance and increase the use of the system, by the end of 2016-17, the CFIA had signed arrangements for the sharing of data on livestock traceability, in accordance with applicable laws, with eight provinces, and a data-sharing arrangement with a ninth province was agreed to in principle. Use of the portal is expected to grow significantly with the following:

Engaging International Partners to Enhance Safety

Having quick access to the necessary vaccines is critical to Canada's ability to respond to an outbreak of foot and mouth disease. In May 2016, the North American foot and mouth disease vaccine bank (for Canada, Mexico and the United States) signed an arrangement with the Australian and the New Zealand banks for the vaccine for foot and mouth disease. The arrangement allows for sharing of foot and mouth disease vaccine in an emergency. In August 2016, changes were also made to the North American foot and mouth disease vaccine bank. These changes include an increase in budget for costs related to the concentrate of the vaccine antigen and a decision to store all new concentrates at the manufacturer's site in Lyon, France. Storage at the manufacturer harmonizes the storage location of the North American foot and mouth disease vaccine bank with the storage location of those in New Zealand and Australia. It also allows further expansion of a sharing agreement to the European banks.

Results achieved
Expected results Performance indicators Target Date to achieve target 2016-17 Actual results 2015-16 Actual results 2014-15 Actual results
Federally registered veterinary biologics establishments meet federal regulations Percentage of inspected federally registered veterinary biologics establishments in compliance with federal regulations 90% March 31, 2017 100% 96% 93%
Veterinary biological products in compliance with federal regulations Percentage of tested veterinary biological products in compliance with federal regulations 100% March 31, 2017 100% 99.30% 100%
Animals in Canada are transported humanely Percentage of inspected live loads in compliance with humane transport standards 100% March 31, 2017 98.53% 98.34% 98%

CFIA performance targets are set to be achieved on a long-term basis in support of the expected results. The CFIA monitors progress to achieve the targets and adjusts as appropriate.

The following tables present the terrestrial animal health sub-program's planned and actual spending and full-time equivalents for 2016-17.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2016-17
Planned spending
2016-17
Actual spending (authorities used)
2016-17
Difference (actual minus planned)
117,666,129 147,179,689 29,513,560
Human resources (full-time equivalents)
2016-17 Planned 2016-17 Actual 2016-17
Difference (actual minus planned)
808 749 (59)

Sub-Program 1.2.2: Aquatic Animal Health

The aquatic animal health sub-program aims to mitigate risks associated with the introduction and spread of certain aquatic animal diseases of concern to Canada. This sub-program achieves its objectives by partnering with Fisheries and Oceans Canada to deliver on initiatives that track, detect and control aquatic animal diseases as set out in the relevant governing acts and regulations. Through verification of compliance, this sub-program supports domestic and international confidence that Canada's aquatic animal resources are free from aquatic animal diseases, and contributes to the sustainable productivity of aquaculture and harvest fisheries. This sub-program uses funding from the following transfer payment: Statutory Compensation Payments.

Results

In 2016-17, there were no reports of regulated aquatic animal diseases associated with regulated pathways. The CFIA continues to monitor compliance with the import requirements through multiple avenues, including tracking through mandatory notification of regulated diseases reported by Canadian stakeholders and trace-back investigations, completed in response to all regulated disease occurrences in Canada.

The CFIA continues to safeguard both wild and cultured aquatic animal resources in two ways:

In 2016-17, the CFIA negotiated a certificate to allow imports of barramundi - a type of fish - for culture purposes from Australia. This import certificate responds to a long-standing request to open market access as part of the Government of Canada's initiative to grow and diversify the aquaculture sector.

The CFIA continues to ensure that Canadian and domestically derived aquatic animals meet international requirements for export by ensuring that export requirements are negotiated based on Canada's system of regulatory control. This effort also aligns those requirements with the international standards of the World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE). In 2016-17, negotiations were finalized for new or amended health certificates for aquatic animals or their products to Argentina, China, India, Japan, South Korea, Lebanon, Peru and Russia. This effort also ensures that Canada's aquaculture and seafood sectors have new and continued market access for their products. New certificates include those for the export of feed for shrimp from Canada to India and for live aquatic animals for human consumption to South Korea. Products exported to South Korea that will be covered by these new certificates are valued at $76 million.

In June 2016, following detection by planned surveillance, the CFIA confirmed the presence of a deadly infectious fish disease called viral haemorrhagic septicaemia, virus strain Iva, in wild Atlantic herring harvested off the east coast of Canada. From these findings, the CFIA declared infected areas on the east coast for this disease to prevent spread to other watersheds. Some movements of susceptible species of finfish and equipment - for example, used net-pens - out of the infected areas now require domestic permits.

In August 2016, the CFIA confirmed the presence of whirling disease - an infectious, often fatal disease of finfish caused by a protozoan - in wild finfish in the Bow River, Alberta. From these findings, the CFIA declared the Bow River watershed as an infected area. Controls have been implemented, such as domestic movement permits, to move susceptible species of finfish and equipment/environmental material, including river sediment, out of the infected area. Results from surveillance by the provincial government in other watersheds are still pending, and the size of the infected area in Alberta may expand. The CFIA continues to work with both Parks Canada and the Government of Alberta to manage whirling disease to protect wild and cultured finfish.

Enhancing Safety in Imported and Domestic Products

The CFIA safeguards Canada's aquatic animal resources, and implements controls such as permits to contain certain aquatic animal reportable diseases within areas of Canada where they are known to occur. As part of the final phase of the development of the national aquatic animal health program, the domestic movement control program for aquatic animals was implemented in December 2015. The final phase entails containing reportable aquatic animal diseases to defined geographic regions of Canada and removing requirements under the Fish Health Protection Regulations enabled by the Fisheries Act, administered by Fisheries and Oceans Canada. This program will provide additional measures for the control of aquatic animal disease not available under any other act in Canada and will limit regulatory requirements to Canadians with high-risk movements. The CFIA and Fisheries and Oceans Canada will now focus on eliminating any additional federal legislative and regulatory overlap related to federal management of aquatic animal diseases.

Results achieved
Expected results Performance indicators Target Date to achieve target 2016-17 Actual results 2015-16 Actual results 2014-15 Actual results
Domestic aquatic animals and their products are compliant with Canadian regulations and meet the standards of international agreements Percentage of certified aquatic animal and aquatic animal product shipments that meet the receiving country's import requirements 99% March 31, 2017 99% 99.9% 99.7%
Risks to the Canadian aquatic animal resource base are mitigated Number of reportable aquatic animal diseases that have entered into Canada via specified regulated pathways 0 March 31, 2017 0 2 0

CFIA performance targets are set to be achieved on a long-term basis in support of the expected results. The CFIA monitors progress to achieve the targets and adjusts as appropriate.

The following tables present the Aquatic Animal Health Sub-Program's planned and actual spending and full-time equivalents for 2016-17.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2016-17
Planned spending
2016-17
Actual spending (authorities used)
2016-17
Difference (actual minus planned)
3,992,234 5,290,518 1,298,284
Human resources (full-time equivalents)
2016-17 Planned 2016-17 Actual 2016-17
Difference (actual minus planned)
37 37 0

Sub-Program 1.2.3: Feed

The feed sub-program aims to minimize risks associated with livestock and poultry feeds manufactured in or imported into Canada. The sub-program achieves its objectives by verifying that feeds are safe, effective and labelled in accordance with the relevant governing acts and regulations. This sub-program contributes to the production and maintenance of a healthy and sustainable animal resource base which supports food safety and environmental sustainability. Through verification of compliance, this sub-program supports confidence in feed manufactured in Canada.

Results

Regulatory Modernization to Enhance Safety and Efficiency

Did you know …?

An innovative and streamlined approach to processing applications for the renewal of feed registrations was introduced in 2016-17. This process reduced the paperwork burden for the industry and contributed to improved service standards for all types of feed files.

Safe and effective feeds contribute to the production of healthy livestock and safe foods of animal origin for human consumption. To align better with current feed industry and livestock husbandry practices, science and technology and to provide clarity to relevant parties, the CFIA is proposing comprehensive amendments to the Feeds Regulations. During 2016-17, consultations on a consolidated regulatory framework proposal and six technical pieces for incorporation by reference were completed. Three of the technical pieces offer regulated parties more efficient and flexible approaches for feed composition and labelling, while the other three provide updated safety standards. To inform the cost-benefit analysis of the proposed regulatory changes, baseline and costing economic surveys were distributed to Canadian commercial feed and on-farm sectors for feedback. The Agency is pursuing incorporation by reference of documents containing many of the current technical feed standards. This would allow for more timely reviews and updates to standards as new science, hazards and risk management measures emerge over time. Publication in the Canada Gazette, Part IFootnote 10, is expected in late 2017.

Under new authorities in the Feeds Act, the CFIA will be expanding the acceptance of foreign data in application packages. The Agency will also be able to accept foreign country authorizations for new ingredients where the foreign country's process for the approval of feed ingredients meets Canadian requirements. These measures will aid the pre-market submission process and allow for more timely access to innovative products in Canada. The CFIA has engaged its United States and European Union counterparts to determine whether the two systems are equivalent to the Canadian system. A comparison framework has been developed and used to begin discussions with the respective regulatory bodies. An additional initiative, sponsored by international feed industries, is examining the potential to harmonize specific data requirements, possibly leading to a global application package.

Results achieved
Expected results Performance indicators Target Date to achieve target 2016-17 Actual results 2015-16 Actual results 2014-15 Actual results
Feed establishments meet federal regulations Percentage of inspected feed establishments in compliance with Feeds Regulations and Health of Animals Regulations (Feed Ban), after follow-up, not including labelling tasks 95% March 31, 2017 95% 95.5% 95.2.%
Feed labels meet federal regulations Percentage of inspected feed facilities in compliance with Feeds Regulations and Health of Animals Regulations (Feed Ban), after follow-up, when assessed against inspection tasks associated with labelling 95% March 31, 2017 96% 96.6% 95.8%

The following tables present the feed sub-program's planned and actual spending and full-time equivalents for 2016-17.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2016-17
Planned spending
2016-17
Actual spending (authorities used)
2016-17
Difference (actual minus planned)
16,397,492 20,776,243 4,378,751
Human resources (full-time equivalents)
2016-17 Planned 2016-17 Actual 2016-17
Difference (actual minus planned)
178 189 11
Plant Resources Sub-Program Activity Summary

Sub-Program 1.3.1: Plant Protection

The plant protection sub-program aims to mitigate the risks associated with the introduction and spread of plant pests of quarantine significance to Canada. This sub-program achieves its objectives by delivering initiatives that track, detect and control, or eradicate regulated plant pests and diseases as set out in the relevant governing acts and regulations. The sub-program verifies that plants and plant products, and their associated risk pathways, meet phytosanitary requirements. Through verification of compliance, this sub-program supports environmental sustainability and public health and instils confidence in Canada's plants and plant products. This sub-program uses funding from the following transfer payment: Statutory Compensation Payments.

Results

Partnering with the United States and Other Foreign Trading Partners to Enhance Plant Resource Safety

Canada works with the United States and other countries through various initiatives to support plant resources protection and market access for plant products. In 2016-17, Canada continued to work with the United States on building a strong North American perimeter approach to plant protection, including the signing of the memorandum of understanding and technical requirements for the regulatory cooperation council greenhouse certification program project. This project aims to align requirements in Canada and the United States and facilitate the movement of greenhouse plants. A joint training development initiative was started as a result.
Canada and the United States continued to enhance and expand the Asian gypsy moth pre-departure certification program under the Beyond the Border Initiative. Trilateral meetings to assess the Asian gypsy moth pre-departure certification programs in the regulated countries of Russia, South Korea, China and Japan, took place. The assessments identified areas for further program enhancement and collaboration. Canada and the United States also met with Chile and New Zealand to establish areas for the harmonization of programs for the Asian gypsy moth among regulating countries.

The CFIA continued to reinforce plant health protection in Canada through the implementation of the integrated cargo security strategy, which is led by Canada Border Services Agency. The strategy's objectives are to mitigate risks early and aid the flow of legitimate cargo. Progress was also made in finalizing Canada's wood packaging import policy.

The CFIA made progress toward a common approach to plant protection between the Agency and the United States Department of Agriculture's Animal and Plant Health Inspection Services, with the establishment of working groups to further explore the following issues:

The CFIA continued to work with the United States on issues of border and rejected in-transit shipment. The collaboration also looked at implementing the interim in-transit protocol to mitigate the risk of pest introductions from shipments transiting Canada. Progress was made on developing the comprehensive in-transit program for plant health. This is part of a broader initiative to protect plant health in North America, called "Mitigation of Plant Health Risks to North America." The initiative is a series of measures to prevent the spread of plant pests from origin to destination. The result for Canadians will be a consistent approach to addressing plant health issues, while ensuring valuable trade continues between the United States and Canada.

Results achieved
Expected results Performance indicators Target Date to achieve target 2016-17 Actual results 2015-16 Actual results 2014-15 Actual results
Pre-border plant pest risks are mitigated Percentage of inspected shipments from off-shore system approaches or pre-clearance programs in compliance with federal regulations 85% March 31, 2017 99.00% 96.22% 97%
At-Border plant pest risks are mitigated Percentage of pre-arrival documentation in compliance with Canadian import requirements 90% March 31, 2017 97% 99.00% 98.7%
Post-border plant pest risks are mitigated Percentage of new pest detections that have a science based management plan initiated within one year 90% March 31, 2017 100% 99.00% 98.7%

CFIA performance targets are set to be achieved on a long-term basis in support of the expected results. The CFIA monitors progress to achieve the targets and adjusts as appropriate.

The following tables present the plant protection sub-program's planned and actual spending and full-time equivalents for 2016-17.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2016-17
Planned spending
2016-17
Actual spending (authorities used)
2016-17
Difference (actual minus planned)
75,805,600 62,726,094 (13,079,506)
Human resources (full-time equivalents)
2016-17 Planned 2016-17 Actual 2016-17
Difference (actual minus planned)
607 542 (65)

Sub-Program 1.3.2: Seed

The seed sub-program aims to ensure that seeds sold in Canada meet established standards, such that seeds are properly represented in the marketplace and that most agricultural crop kinds are registered before entering the marketplace. The sub-program achieves its objectives by verifying that seeds meet quality, biosafety, labelling and registration standards as set out in the relevant governing acts and regulations. Regulating the environmental release of plants with novel traits contributes to environmental sustainability and the health and safety of Canadians. Furthermore, quality assured and accurately labelled seeds contribute to a prosperous agricultural production system and to domestic and international confidence in Canada's seeds.

Results

Regulatory Modernization to Enhance Safety and Efficiency

Regulatory reform continued with amendments to the ministerial order to control and limit the introduction of new weed seeds into Canada. The revised ministerial order mitigates the introduction of new weed species into Canada by preventing or limiting the presence of weed species in seed sold in, or imported into, Canada. The revised order includes harmful new species that have been identified. It has reclassified existing species, based on the most recent information about their distribution in Canada. Some weed species can invade agricultural and natural areas, causing serious damage to our economy and environment. Reducing the number of weed species introduced and spread helps to preserve the prosperity of Canada's agricultural sector.

The CFIA collaborated with the twelve-seed variety registration recommending committees to implement uniform operating procedures that help ensure consistency, transparency, and fairness in the variety registration process. Improvements in transparency, fairness, predictability, and sound governance, including recourse, are primary targets. The model operating procedures apply a national standard across these committees in Canada.

Results achieved
Expected results Performance indicators Target Date to achieve target 2016-17 Actual results 2015-16 Actual results 2014-15 Actual results
Seed complies with federal regulations Percentage of tested domestic pedigreed seed lots in compliance with federal regulations 95% March 31, 2017 93.6% 96.4% 98.3%
Seed complies with federal regulations Percentage of authorized confined releases of Plants with Novel Traits into the Canadian environment that are in compliance with the authorized conditions 90% March 31, 2017 92% 97% 98%

CFIA performance targets are set to be achieved on a long-term basis in support of the expected results. The CFIA monitors progress to achieve the targets and adjusts as appropriate.

The following tables present the seed sub-program's planned and actual spending and full-time equivalents for 2016-17.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2016-17
Planned spending
2016-17
Actual spending (authorities used)
2016-17
Difference (actual minus planned)
12,912,971 11,501,320 (1,411,651)
Human resources (full-time equivalents)
2016-17 Planned 2016-17 Actual 2016-17
Difference (actual minus planned)
104 106 2

Sub-Program 1.3.3: Fertilizer

The fertilizer sub-program aims to ensure that regulated fertilizer, fertilizer/pesticides and supplement products sold in Canada are properly labelled and safe for humans, plants, animals, and the environment. The sub-program achieves its objectives by verifying that all fertilizers and supplements meet the standards for safety as set out in the relevant governing acts and regulations. Through verification of compliance, the sub-program contributes to public health and environmental sustainability and supports domestic and international confidence in fertilizers, fertilizer/pesticides and supplements manufactured in Canada.

Results

Regulatory Modernization to Enhance Safety

The CFIA continued to prepare for consultations on amendments to the Fertilizers Regulations, targeted for December 2017. Modernization of the Fertilizers Regulations is expected to increase responsiveness to industry changes, address gaps, weaknesses and inconsistencies, and provide clarity and flexibility to assist regulated parties in fulfilling their obligations.

The implementation of authorities set out in the Agricultural GrowthAct, such as record keeping and incorporation by reference, was added to the fertilizer regulatory modernization proposal.

In addition, the CFIA implemented an export certification service to assist and enhance the access for Canadian fertilizers and supplements to international markets.

Results achieved
Expected results Performance indicators Target Date to achieve target 2016-17 Actual results 2015-16 Actual results 2014-15 Actual results
Fertilizer and supplement products meet federal regulations Percentage of inspected fertilizer and supplement products in compliance with federal regulations (Fertilizers Regulations) 90% March 31, 2017 94% 96.4% 98.3%
Fertilizer and supplement products meet federal regulations Percentage of submissions reviewed within the prescribed service delivery standards 90% March 31, 2017 92% 97% 98%

CFIA performance targets are set to be achieved on a long-term basis in support of the expected results. The CFIA monitors progress to achieve the targets and adjusts as appropriate.

The following tables present the fertilizer sub-program's planned and actual spending and full-time equivalents for 2016-17.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2016-17
Planned spending
2016-17
Actual spending (authorities used)
2016-17
Difference (actual minus planned)
3,533,897 4,013,203 479,306
Human resources (full-time equivalents)
2016-17 Planned 2016-17 Actual 2016-17
Difference (actual minus planned)
36 38 2

Sub-Program 1.3.4: Intellectual Property Rights

The intellectual property rights sub-program, by which plant breeders can obtain intellectual property rights for their new plant varieties, aims to create an environment in Canada which supports innovation in plant breeding, as set out in the relevant governing acts and regulations. This sub-program achieves its objectives by assessing applications from plant breeders to determine that new plant varieties meet the criteria for protection, and when all requirements have been met, granting rights to the variety breeder/owner for a period of up to 18 years. The owner of a new variety who receives a grant of rights has exclusive rights over use of the variety, and will be able to protect his/her new variety from exploitation by others. By enforcing the relevant governing acts and regulations, this sub-program stimulates plant breeding in Canada, facilitates better access to foreign varieties for Canadian producers and supports the protection of Canadian varieties in other countries.

Results

Did you know …?

Plant breeders' rights are a form of intellectual property rights by which plant breeders can protect their new varieties in the same way an inventor protects a new invention with a patent.

To facilitate Canadian producers' access to foreign-bred plant varieties, the Plant Breeders' Rights Office expanded its policy on the acceptance of international data to support intellectual property protection in Canada. As of April 2016, applications for horticulture and ornamental crop kinds may include official foreign "distinctness, uniformity, and stability" test reports from other members of the International Union for the Protection of New Varieties of Plants, in lieu of conducting these tests in Canada. These measures support cooperation and harmonization internationally, while reducing the administrative burden for plant breeders filing applications in Canada.

The change will support investment in domestic plant breeding by encouraging foreign breeders to protect and sell their varieties in Canada. With the changes, Canadian farmers will have improved access to new varieties that meet specific market demands with enhanced crop yields, improved disease and drought resistance.

Results achieved
Expected results Performance indicators Target Date to achieve target 2016-17 Actual results 2015-16 Actual results 2014-15 Actual results
Plant breeders develop new varieties for the Canadian market Percentage of Plant Breeders' Rights applications that reach approval and are granted rights 100% March 31, 2017 100% 100% 100%

CFIA performance targets are set to be achieved on a long-term basis in support of the expected results. The CFIA monitors progress to achieve the targets and adjusts as appropriate.

The following tables present the intellectual property rights sub-program's planned and actual spending and full-time equivalents for 2016-17.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2016-17
Planned spending
2016-17
Actual spending (authorities used)
2016-17
Difference (actual minus planned)
1,642,229 1,194,972 (447,257)
Human resources (full-time equivalents)
2016-17 Planned 2016-17 Actual 2016-17
Difference (actual minus planned)
9 9 0

List of supplementary information tables for the 2016-17 Departmental Results Report

Departmental Sustainable Development Strategy

1. Overview of the federal government's approach to sustainable development

The 2013-16 Federal Sustainable Development Strategy (FSDS) presents the Government of Canada's sustainable development activities, as required by the Federal Sustainable Development Act. In keeping with the objectives of the Act to make environmental decision making more transparent and accountable to Parliament, the CFIA supports the implementation of the strategy through the activities described in this supplementary information table.

2. CFIA Sustainable Development Strategy

This Departmental Sustainable Development Strategy describes the CFIA's actions in support of Theme III: Protecting Nature and Canadians and Theme IV: Shrinking the Environmental Footprint, beginning with government. The report for 2016-17 presents a high-level overview of results and is the final report under the 2013-16 Federal Sustainable Development Strategy. Last year's report is available in the CFIA's 2015-16 Departmental Performance Report.

3. CFIA performance highlights

Theme III: Protecting Nature and Canadians

Under Theme III, the CFIA contributed to the 2013-16 Federal Sustainable Development Strategy through six (6) implementation strategies for Goal 4: Conserving and Restoring Ecosystems, Wildlife and Habitat, and Protecting Canadians.

Agency-led targets

N/A - The CFIA does not lead any targets.

Implementation strategies: performance summary

The six implementation strategies support the Theme III target 4.6: Invasive Alien Species. By 2020, pathways of invasive alien species introductions are identified, and risk-based intervention or management plans are in place for priority pathways and species, in Goal 4: Conserving and Restoring Ecosystems, Wildlife and Habitat, and Protecting Canadians.

The Agency contributed to the following implementation strategies:

Theme IV: Shrinking the environmental footprint, beginning with government

Under Theme IV, the Canadian Food Inspection Agency contributed to the 2013-16 FSDS through three implementation strategies for Goal 6: Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Energy and Goal 7: Waste and Asset Management.

Goal 6: greenhouse gas emissions and energy Reduce the carbon footprint and energy consumption of federal operations

Target 6.1: greenhouse gas emissions reduction

The Government of Canada will reduce greenhouse gas emissions from its buildings and fleets by 17% below 2005 levels by 2020.

CFIA target:

The CFIA will reduce greenhouse gas emissions from its fleet by 13% below 2005 levels by 2020.

FSDS performance indicator FSDS performance results
Greenhouse gas emissions (kt CO2 equivalent) in fiscal year 2005-06. 6.43 kt CO2
Greenhouse gas emissions (kt CO2 equivalent) in fiscal year 2016-17. 4.07 kt CO2
Percentage change in greenhouse gas emissions from fiscal year 2005-06 to fiscal year 2015-16, inclusive of renewable power emission credits, if applicable. - 36.7%
Adjustments made to base year greenhouse gas emissions. No

Goal 7: waste and asset management Reduce waste generated, and minimize the environmental impacts of assets throughout their life cycle.

Target 7.2: green procurement

As of April 1, 2014, the Government of Canada will continue to take action to embed environmental considerations into public procurement, in accordance with the federal Policy on Green Procurement.

CFIA target:

By March 31, 2017, 90% of vehicles purchased annually are from the pre-authorized vehicle list.

FSDS performance indicator FSDS performance results
The CFIA approach to further the implementation of the Policy on Green Procurement in Place as of April 1, 2014, is listed below. The existing CFIA Procurement and Contracting Policy (2008) posted on the CFIA's internal website references the Treasury Board's Policy on Green Procurement, which promotes the selection of Green Products / Services when searching the Public Services and Procurement Canada Standing Offer Index for goods or services.
Number and percentage of procurement and/or material management specialists who completed the Canada School of Public Service Green Procurement course (C215) or equivalent, in fiscal year 2016-17. 2 of 2 specialists, 100%
Number and percentage of managers and functional heads of procurement and material whose performance evaluation includes support and contribution toward green procurement, in fiscal year 2016-17. 3 of 3 of managers and functional heads of procurement, 100%
Percentage of vehicles purchased from the pre-authorized vehicle list, relative to total number of vehicles purchased in fiscal year 2016-2017. 100%

Implementation strategies: performance summary

4. Report on Strategic Environmental Assessment

During the 2016-17 reporting cycle, the CFIA considered the environmental effects of initiatives subject to the Cabinet Directive on the Environmental Assessment of Policy, Plan and Program Proposals, as part of its decision-making processes.

As the CFIA did not develop any initiatives that required a Strategic Environmental Assessment, no related public statements were produced.

Details on transfer payment programs of $5 million or more

General information

Name of transfer payment program

Statutory Compensation Payments

Start date: N/A

End date: N/A

Type of transfer payment: N/A

Type of appropriation: N/A

Fiscal year for terms and conditions: N/A

Strategic Outcome: A safe and accessible food supply and plant and animal resource base.

Link to department's Program Alignment Architecture: N/A

Description: Compensation payments in accordance with requirements established by regulations under the Plant Protection Act or the Health of Animals Act, and authorized pursuant to the Canadian Food Inspection Agency Act. These payments are to compensate Canadians, in accordance with the appropriate regulations, for plants or animals ordered destroyed for the purpose of disease control.

Results achieved

Plant Resources Program: seven Canadians were compensated for plants ordered destroyed.

Animal Health and Zoonotics Program: 152 Canadians were compensated for animals ordered destroyed.

Comments on variances

Plant Resources Program: none

Animal Health and Zoonotics Program: Actual compensation payments made to Canadians were $37.4 million higher than the $3.2 million that was earmarked under Planned Spending. This increase is largely attributed to bovine tuberculosis in Alberta.

Audits completed or planned: N/A

Evaluations completed or planned: N/A

Engagement of applicants and recipients: N/A

Plant Resources Program (dollars)
Type of transfer payment 2014-15 Actual
spending
2015-16 Actual
spending
2016-17 Planned
spending
2016-17 Total
authorities available for use
2016-17 Actual
spending (authorities used)
Variance (2016-17 actual minus 2016-17 planned)
Total other types of transfer payments 1,004,726 1,632,836 300,000 238,062 238,062 -61,938
Total program 1,004,726 1,632,836 300,000 238,062 238,062 -61,938
Animal Health and Zoonotics Program (dollars)
Type of transfer payment 2014-15 Actual
spending
2015-16 Actual
spending
2016-17 Planned
spending
2016-17 Total
authorities available for use
2016-17 Actual
spending (authorities used)
Variance (2016-17 actual minus 2016-17 planned)
Total other types of transfer payments 11,550,351 15,498,181 3,200,000 40,629,889 40,629,889 37,429,889
Total program 11,550,351 15,498,181 3,200,000 40,629,889 40,629,889 37,429,889

Horizontal initiatives

General information
Name of horizontal initiative Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy Renewal
Lead department(s) Canadian Food Inspection Agency
Federal partner organization(s) Health Canada; Public Health Agency of Canada
Non-federal and non-governmental partner(s) Not Applicable
Start date of the horizontal initiative 2014-15 Renewal Core BSE program (program regularly renewed since inception in 2003)
End date of the horizontal initiative 2018-19
Total federal funding allocated (2014-15 to 2018-19) (dollars) 203,229,461 Total federal funding allocated (2014-15 to 2018-19)
Total federal planned spending to March 31, 2017 (dollars) 121,757,377 Total federal planned spending to March 31, 2017
Total federal actual spending to March 31, 2017 (dollars) 112,312,353 Total federal actual spending to March 31, 2017
Funding contributed by non-federal and non-governmental partners Not Applicable
Governance structures The CFIA is the federal lead for bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) program delivery. A summative evaluation of the CFIA's BSE program conducted in 2008 recommended the governance of the program be strengthened to enhance coordination and communication of BSE-related activities, both internally and with partner organizations. Based on that recommendation and consistent with governance models for related horizontal initiatives, the CFIA launched a new committee structure to bring the Agency's governance approach in line with evolving business needs in 2015. The new governance structure enhances whole-of-Agency information sharing and integration. It also ensures a more efficient and streamlined senior-level committee structure. It is expected that the renewed structure will foster a better approach to decision making and will support day-to-day operations across the Agency. To ensure that business line perspectives are integrated into decision-making process, three executive-level committees on animal health, plant and food safety are supported.
Contact information

Canadian Food Inspection Agency
Dr. Jaspinder Komal
Executive Director
Animal Health Directorate
Policy & Programs Branch
613-773-7472

Public Health Agency of Canada
Steven Sternthal
Director General
Centre for Food-borne, Environmental and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases
Infectious Disease Prevention and Control Branch
613-948-6883

Health Canada
Etienne Ouimette
Director General
Resource Management & Operations Directorate
Health Products and Food Branch
613-957-6690

Results information
Description of the horizontal initiative

To protect human and animal health, the bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) program conducts surveillance, research and risk assessments on BSE and other transmissible spongiform encephalopathies. This effort also minimizes the risk of exposure to infected materials, maintains consumer confidence through assessment of the effectiveness of the risk mitigation, and ensures measures are in place to control any potential outbreaks. The BSE program supports market access for cattle, beef and related products by promoting and explaining Canada's BSE program to domestic and international stakeholders.

Health Canada conducts research and risk assessments on human exposure to BSE and other transmissible spongiform encephalopathies. The Public Health Agency of Canada carries out surveillance of human transmissible spongiform encephalopathies and targeted supporting research in this area. The CFIA does the following:

  • researches and assesses the risk of animal exposure to BSE;
  • enforces the removal of specified risk material from the animal feed and the human food chains;
  • monitors products entering and leaving Canada for adherence to Canadian standards or the standards of the importing country;
  • monitors for the prevalence of BSE in the cattle population (through surveillance);
  • verifies that measures to control potential outbreaks are in place; and
  • explains Canada's BSE control measures to domestic and international stakeholders - for example, through the veterinarians abroad program - to maintain confidence in Canada's BSE program.
Fiscal year of planned completion of next evaluation 2018-2019
Shared outcome of federal partners Performance indicators Targets Data source and frequency (DSF) of monitoring and reporting Results

To contribute to the protection of human and animal health, which supports domestic and international market access for Canadian beef and beef products.

ER 1: Specified risk material removal from the human food chain.

PI 1: Industry compliance rate for removal of specified risk material. T 1: 100% compliance. Internal files / documents/databases; quarterly monitoring; annual reporting. AR 1: A compliance rate of 99.5% was achieved in tasks delivered.

Products imported into Canada meet Canadian standards.

ER 2: Import controls.

PI 2.1: Percentage of import policies verified and updated as required.

PI 2.2: BSE import policy is verified and updated as required.

T 2.1: 25% per year.

T 2.2: Annually, when the World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE) updates the BSE risk status country lists.

Internal files/documents/ databases; annual monitoring and reporting.

AR 2.1: Target met.

AR 2.2: Target met.

Safe animals and food and market access

ER 3: BSE surveillance.

PI 3: Temporal trend in exposure to the BSE agent in the cattle population. T 3: Testing 30,000 samples from the high-risk category of cattle is the minimum national target. Internal files / documents/databases; monthly monitoring and quarterly reporting. AR 3: In the 2016-17 fiscal year, the total number of BSE samples tested by the national transmissible spongiform encephalopathy network laboratories was 28,946 (18,903 CFIA and 10,043 provincial).
  • Governments and other entities make informed decisions to manage animal and related human health issues;
  • Risk to Canadian livestock resource base are mitigated; and
  • Canadian livestock sector is compliant with regulations.

ER 4: Cattle identification.

PI 4.1: Number and development status of inspection tools in place.

PI 4.2: Number of inspectors trained.

PI 4.3: Ratio of non-compliances versus number of compliance verification system tasks carried out by CFIA staff expressed as a percentage.

PI 4.4: Percentage of responses to disease and epidemiological investigations that are completed within service standards.

T 4.1: Training, tools and materials are relevant and up-to-date.

T 4.2: All inspectors verifying compliance are trained.

T 4.3: 95% compliance.

T 4.4: 100%

DSF 4.1: Manual for Policy and Programs Branch, annually.

DSF 4.2: Manual for Operations Branch, annually.

DSF 4.3: Manual for Operations Branch, annually.

DSF 4.4: Manual for Operations Branch, annually.

AR 4.1:

  • Delivery of the e-training course (I6D286), the classroom course (I6D287) and the on-site coaching checklist (I6D270) to validate that inspectors are qualified to deliver the program;
  • Development of Traceability National Information Portal tutorial to inform inspectors how to use Traceability National Information Portal; and
  • Updates to the manual of procedures.

AR 4.2: All inspectors verifying compliance are trained.

AR 4.3: 94.2% compliance.

AR 4.4: No BSE investigations were required in 2016-2017.

Bovine products exported from Canada meet requirements imposed by foreign countries.

ER 5: Export certification.

PI 5: Percentage of exports meeting the standards of the importing country as required. T 5: 100% Internal files/documents/ databases; quarterly monitoring and annual reporting. AR 5: 100%.

Maintain or improve confidence in Canada's animal production and food system, promoting access to domestic and international markets.

ER 6: Technical market access support.

PI 6: Market demand for Canadian bovines and beef products; consumer confidence in beef in Canada as tracked by media. T 6: An ongoing record (trend) of markets that are opened/expanded/maintained, and exports of Canadian beef and cattle; media tracking for consumer confidence in beef in Canada. Internal files / documents / databases; annual monitoring and reporting. AR 6: Target Met.

ER 7: Health products risk assessment and targeted research.

Immediate Outcome: Increased expertise and knowledge of BSE / transmissible spongiform encephalopathies science, risks and product surveillance.

PI 7.1: Number and type of training, conferences, symposiums, etc. attended by Health Canada staff on BSE / transmissible spongiform encephalopathies topics.

PI 7.2: Number of health risk assessments conducted as a result of BSE suspicion by product line (i.e. biologics).

PI 7.3: Number of products / product lots assessed for transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (or transmissible spongiform encephalopathies / BSE risks).

T 7.1: 2

T 7.2: 0 (as needed)

T 7.3: 400 lots per year

Annual monitoring and reporting of data analysis, research papers, laboratory studies, research findings, risk assessments, incident reports, certificates, internal records.

AR 7.1: Two courses were planned for Health Canada staff but not completed due to operational demands.

AR 7.2: 0

AR 7.3: 622 lots assessed.

ER 8: Food safety and nutrition: risk assessment

Immediate Outcome: Increased expertise and knowledge of BSE / transmissible spongiform encephalopathies science, risks and product surveillance.

Intermediate Outcome: Increased knowledge-based decision-making.

PI 8.1: Number and type of training, conferences, symposiums, etc. attended by Health Canada staff on BSE / transmissible spongiform encephalopathies topics.

PI 8.2: Number of health risk assessments conducted as a result of BSE suspicion by product line (i.e. food products).

PI 8.3: Number of knowledge transfer activities related to BSE / transmissible spongiform encephalopathies.

T 8.1: 1 conference

T 8.2: 0

T 8.3: 2

Annual monitoring and reporting of data analysis, research papers, laboratory studies, research findings, risk assessments, incident reports, certificates, internal records.

AR 8.1: 1 conference was attended.

AR 8.2: Health Canada continued to provide food safety risk assessment and policy advice to Federal and Provincial regulatory authorities on risks of BSE / transmissible spongiform encephalopathy, and conducted environmental scanning activities to identify new and emerging threats from BSE / transmissible spongiform encephalopathy in the food supply.

AR 8.3: 2

ER 9: Prion diseases program

Outcome: Risks of human transmissible spongiform encephalopathies in Canada remain clearly defined and well controlled.

PI 9: Alignment of Public Health Agency of Canada data from surveillance of human transmissible spongiform encephalopathies with international benchmarks; the number of research presentations and publications; use of policy advice in decision-making.

T 9.1: Maintenance of Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease surveillance sensitivity at a level where observed mortality from all human transmissible spongiform encephalopathies in Canada is consistent with that observed internationally (i.e. 1 to 2 per million population).

T 9.2: Technological development to ensure Canadian diagnostic analyses remain consistent with those performed internationally.

T 9.3: At least 2 research presentations, publications or reports per year.

DSF 9.1: Continuous monitoring and reporting of surveillance statistics and database.

DSF 9.2: Annual monitoring and reporting of scientific publication records of researchers and Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease surveillance system, Electronic databases (publications; citations; impact factors).

DSF 9.3: Annual monitoring and reporting of laboratory reports and databases (internal records), National Microbiological Laboratory Quality System (internal records).

AR 9.1: The annualized crude mortality rate for Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease in Canada in 2016 as reported by the Public Health Agency of Canada Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease surveillance system was 1.38 per million per year (see the Public Health Agency of Canada's Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease website This estimate will increase as data for 2016 are finalized during 2017 with completion of case classification.

AR 9.2: A new test, endpoint quaking-induced conversion, was added to our cerebrospinal fluid panel in March 2016.

Our 14-3-3 Western assay was replaced with a commercial 14-3-3 ELISA in February 2016.

These two changes make our Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease diagnostic analyses consistent with those performed internationally.

AR 9.3: 3 Publications

2 Presentations

Expected outcome or result of non-federal and non-governmental partners Not applicable.
Performance summary
Federal organizations Link to department's Program Inventory Contributing programs and activities Link to department's Strategic Outcomes Link to government priorities Total allocation (2014-15 to 2018-19)
(dollars)
2016-17 Planned spending (dollars) 2016-17 Actual spending (dollars) 2016-17 Expected results 2016-17 Performance indicators 2016-17 Targets 2016-17 Actual Results
Canadian Food Inspection Agency Animal Health and Zoonotics Program/ Food Safety Program/ International Collaboration and Technical Agreements Specified risk material removal from the human food chain A Safe and Accessible Food Supply and Plant and Animal Resource Base Increasing Safety in Imported and Domestic Products 42,271,478 8,454,296 7,490,347 ER 1 PI 1 T 1 AR 1
Canadian Food Inspection Agency Animal Health and Zoonotics Program/ Food Safety Program/ International Collaboration and Technical Agreements Import controls A Safe and Accessible Food Supply and Plant and Animal Resource Base Increasing Safety in Imported and Domestic Products 3,101,546 620,309 850,833 ER 2 PI 2.1
PI 2.2
T 2.1
T 2.2
AR 2.1
AR 2.2
Canadian Food Inspection Agency Animal Health and Zoonotics Program/ Food Safety Program/ International Collaboration and Technical Agreements BSE surveillance A Safe and Accessible Food Supply and Plant and Animal Resource Base Increasing Safety in Imported and Domestic Products 76,181,103 15,236,220 13,391,124 ER 3 PI 3 T3 AR 3
Canadian Food Inspection Agency Animal Health and Zoonotics Program/ Food Safety Program/ International Collaboration and Technical Agreements Cattle identification A Safe and Accessible Food Supply and Plant and Animal Resource Base Increasing Safety in Imported and Domestic Products 9,764,780 1,952,956 2,044,901 ER 4 PI 4.1
PI 4.2
PI 4.3
PI 4.4
T 4.1
T 4.2
T 4.3
T 4.4
AR 4.1
AR 4.2
AR 4.3
AR 4.4
Canadian Food Inspection Agency Animal Health and Zoonotics Program/ Food Safety Program/ International Collaboration and Technical Agreements Export certification A Safe and Accessible Food Supply and Plant and Animal Resource Base Getting Canadian Goods to Market 27,458,176 5,491,635 3,775,671 ER 5 PI 5 T 5 AR 5
Canadian Food Inspection Agency Animal Health and Zoonotics Program/ Food Safety Program/ International Collaboration and Technical Agreements Technical market access support A Safe and Accessible Food Supply and Plant and Animal Resource Base Getting Canadian Goods to Market 21,404,148 4,280,830 3,126,776 ER 6 PI 6 T 6 AR 6
Canadian Food Inspection Agency Internal Services Specified risk material removal from the human food chain A Safe and Accessible Food Supply and Plant and Animal Resource Base Increasing Safety in Imported and Domestic Products 3,674,682 734,936 734,936 Not applicable Not applicable Not applicable Not applicable
Canadian Food Inspection Agency Internal Services Import controls A Safe and Accessible Food Supply and Plant and Animal Resource Base Increasing Safety in Imported and Domestic Products 246,269 49,254 49,254 Not applicable Not applicable Not applicable Not applicable
Canadian Food Inspection Agency Internal Services BSE surveillance A Safe and Accessible Food Supply and Plant and Animal Resource Base Increasing Safety in Imported and Domestic Products 4,731,022 946,205 946,205 Not applicable Not applicable Not applicable Not applicable
Canadian Food Inspection Agency Internal Services Cattle identification A Safe and Accessible Food Supply and Plant and Animal Resource Base 907,360 181,472 181,472 Not applicable Not applicable Not applicable Not applicable
Canadian Food Inspection Agency Internal Services Export certification A Safe and Accessible Food Supply and Plant and Animal Resource Base Getting Canadian Goods to Market 2,364,684 472,937 472,937 Not applicable Not applicable Not applicable Not applicable
Canadian Food Inspection Agency Internal Services Technical market access support A Safe and Accessible Food Supply and Plant and Animal Resource Base Getting Canadian Goods to Market 1,390,487 278,097 278,097 Not applicable Not applicable Not applicable Not applicable
Health Canada Health Products Risk assessment Health risks and benefits associated with food products, substances and environmental factors are appropriately managed and communicated to Canadians. Strengthen openness and transparency as modernization of health protection legislation, regulation and service delivery continues. 1,538,882 301, 401 318, 590 ER 7 PI 7.1
PI 7.2
PI 7.3
T 7.1
T 7.2
T 7.3
AR 7.1
AR 7.2
AR 7.3
Health Canada Food Safety and Nutrition Risk assessment and standard setting Health risks and benefits associated with food products, substances and environmental factors are appropriately managed and communicated to Canadians. Strengthen openness and transparency as modernization of health protection legislation, regulation and service delivery continues. 4,194,844 935,827 686,896 ER 8 PI 8.1
PI 8.2
PI 8.3
T 8.1
T 8.2
T 8.3
AR 8.1
AR 8.2
AR 8.3
AR 8.4
Public Health Agency of Canada Public Health Surveillance and Assessment Prion diseases program Not applicable Not applicable 4,000,000 800,000 800,400 ER 9 PI 9 T 9.1
T 9.2
T 9.3
AR 9.1
AR 9.2
AR 9.3
Total for all federal organizations Not applicable Not applicable Not applicable Not applicable 203,229,461 40,736,375 35,148,439 Not applicable Not applicable Not applicable Not applicable

ER 1:

Expected Result: Specified risk material removal from the human food chain.

PI 1:

Performance Indicator: Industry compliance rate for removal of specified risk material.

T 1:

Target: 100% compliance.

AR 1:

Actual Result: A compliance rate of 99.5% was achieved in tasks delivered.

The CFIA conducts on-site inspection of specified risk material removal in federally registered slaughter and boning establishments. The CFIA also reviews records to verify compliance and the effectiveness of the specified risk material control program. In 2016-17, 94.7% (5819/6142) of the planned programming specific to the enforcement and verification of specified risk material removal and controls was delivered nationally.

CFIA continued to conduct annual inspections of non-federally registered establishments for cattle slaughter and audits of provincial inspection systems overseeing specified controls of risk material. Records are reviewed to ensure the removal, segregation and disposal of specified risk material are properly carried out and to determine the adequacy of provincial oversight for plant controls.

ER 2:

Expected Result: Import controls.

PI 2.1:

Performance Indicator: Percentage of import policies verified and updated as required.

PI 2.2:

Performance Indicator: BSE import policy is verified and updated as required.

T 2.1:

Target: 25% per year.

T 2.2:

Target: Annually, when the World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE) updates the BSE risk status country lists.

AR 2.1:

Actual Result: Target met.

AR 2.2:

Actual Result: Target met.

ER 3:

Expected Result: BSE surveillance.

PI 3:

Performance Indicator: Temporal trend in exposure to the BSE agent in the cattle population.

T 3:

Target: Testing 30,000 samples from the high-risk category of cattle is the minimum national target.

AR 3:

In the 2016-17 fiscal year, the total number of BSE samples tested by the national transmissible spongiform encephalopathy network laboratories was 28,946 (18,903 CFIA and 10,043 provincial). Sampling for BSE surveillance is conducted primarily on-farm or at dead stock facilities.

In Eastern Canada, sampling at dead stock is consistent, since contracts are signed with the facilities to hold a specified number of eligible carcasses for testing.

Sampling in Western Canada is done mostly on-farm by private practitioners. The surveillance program relies on producers or practitioners voluntarily submitting eligible diseased, down, dead or dying animals for sampling. If producers and practitioners do not send in samples, the numbers fall. Since BSE can mimic many other common disease conditions of cattle, it would be neither practical nor feasible to try to enforce mandatory surveillance.

However, the CFIA has collaborated with provinces and industry representatives (CanSurvBSE) to encourage continued commitment to the BSE surveillance program. The CFIA continues to work with our industry and provincial partners to maintain a high level of awareness of the importance of sample submission for BSE.

ER 4:

Expected Result: Cattle identification.

PI 4.1:

Performance Indicator: Number and development status of inspection tools in place.

PI 4.2:

Performance Indicator: Number of inspectors trained.

PI 4.3:

Performance Indicator: Ratio of non-compliances versus number of compliance verification system tasks carried out by CFIA staff expressed as a percentage.

PI 4.4:

Performance Indicator: Percentage of responses to disease and epidemiological investigations that are completed within service standards.

T 4.1:

Target: Training, tools and materials are relevant and up-to-date.

T 4.2:

Target: All inspectors verifying compliance are trained.

T 4.3:

Target: 95% compliance.

T 4.4:

Target: 100%

AR 4.1:

Actual Result:

AR 4.2:

Actual Result: All inspectors verifying compliance are trained.

AR 4.3:

Actual Result: 94.2% compliance.

AR 4.4:

Actual Result: In the past, few BSE investigations have been completed within service standards. However, no BSE investigations were required in 2016-2017. Proposed regulations expected to come into force in 2018 would enhance the performance of the cattle ID activities.

ER 5:

Expected Result: Export certification.

PI 5:

Performance Indicator: Percentage of exports meeting the standards of the importing country as required.

T 5:

Target: 100%

AR 5:

Actual Result: 100%

ER 6:

Expected Result: Technical market access support

PI 6:

Performance Indicator: Trends in market demand for Canadian bovines and beef products; media tracking for consumer confidence in beef in Canada.

T 6:

Target: Trends in market demand for Canadian bovines and beef products; media tracking for consumer confidence in beef in Canada.

AR 6:

Actual Result: Target met. The majority of markets closed to Canadian beef after the 2014 BSE detection in Canada have been re-opened, for a current total of 48 trading partners which allow full or partial trade in Canadian beef based on official approval of Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) certification.

ER 7:

Expected Result: Health products risk assessment and targeted research

PI 7.1:

Performance Indicator: Number and type of training, conferences, symposiums, etc. attended by Health Canada staff on BSE / transmissible spongiform encephalopathies topics.

PI 7.2:

Performance Indicator: Number of health risk assessments conducted as a result of BSE suspicion by product line (i.e. biologics).

PI 7.3:

Performance Indicator: Number of products / product lots assessed for transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (or transmissible spongiform encephalopathies / BSE risks).

T 7.1:

Target: 2

T 7.2:

Target: 0 (as needed)

T 7.3:

Target: 400 lots per year

AR 7.1:

Actual Result: Two courses were planned for Health Canada staff but not completed due to operational demands.

AR 7.2:

Actual Result: No risk assessment conducted as there were no suspicions of BSE.

AR 7.3:

Actual Result: 622 lots assessed (585 lots of human/animal plasma derived products and 37 lots of human derived excipients). Additionally, Health Canada completed the review of 49 submissions (21 clinical trial applications; 11 CTA-A; 10 market authorizations; and 7 post-market Changes), which included the verification of the acceptability of source material as it relates to BSE.

ER 8:

Expected Result: Food safety and nutrition: risk assessment.

PI 8.1:

Performance Indicator: Number and type of training, conferences, symposiums, etc. attended by Health Canada staff on BSE / transmissible spongiform encephalopathies topics.

PI 8.2:

Performance Indicator: Number of health risk assessments conducted as a result of BSE suspicion by product line (i.e. food products).

PI 8.3:

Performance Indicator: Number of knowledge transfer activities related to BSE / transmissible spongiform encephalopathies.

T 8.1:

Target: 1 conference

T 8.2:

Target: 0

T 8.3:

Target: 2

AR 8.1:

Actual Result: Health Canada officials attended the Alberta Prion Research Institute / Alberta Livestock and Meat Agency International Expert meeting on Animal BSE / transmissible spongiform encephalopathy. Departmental attendance at the Alberta Prion Research Institute / Alberta Livestock and Meat Agency meeting strengthens the scientific and regulatory capacity in this area and permits access to key international BSE / transmissible spongiform encephalopathy experts.

AR 8.2:

Actual Result: Health Canada continued to provide food safety risk assessment and policy advice to Federal and Provincial regulatory authorities on BSE / transmissible spongiform encephalopathy-related risks and conducted environmental scanning activities to identify new and emerging threats from BSE / transmissible spongiform encephalopathy in the food supply.

AR 8.3:

Actual Result: Two succession-planning events took place to ensure that there is continuity in the Health Canada relationships with key stakeholders in the area of Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy / transmissible spongiform encephalopathy.

ER 9:

Expected Result: Prion diseases program

PI 9:

Performance Indicator: Alignment of Public Health Agency of Canada data from surveillance of human transmissible spongiform encephalopathies with international benchmarks; the number of research presentations and publications; use of policy advice in decision-making.

T 9.1:

Target: Maintenance of Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease surveillance sensitivity at a level where observed mortality from all human transmissible spongiform encephalopathies in Canada is consistent with that observed internationally, that is, 1 to 2 per million population.

T 9.2:

Target: Technological development to ensure Canadian diagnostic analyses remain consistent with those performed internationally.

T 9.3:

Target: At least 2 research presentations, publications or reports per year.

AR 9.1:

Actual Result: The annualized crude mortality rate for Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease in Canada in 2016, as reported by the Public Health Agency of Canada Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease Surveillance System, was 1.38 per million per year.

This estimate will increase as data for 2016 are finalized during 2017 with completion of case classification.

AR 9.2:

Actual Result: A new test, endpoint quaking-induced conversion, was added to our cerebrospinal fluid panel in March 2016. Also, our 14-3-3 Western assay was replaced with a commercial 14-3-3 ELISA in February 2016. These two changes make our Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease diagnostic analyses consistent with those performed internationally

AR 9.3:

Actual Result: Publications and presentations.

Publications:

1. McGuire LI, Poleggi A, Poggiolini I, Suardi S, Grznarova K, Shi S, de Vil B, Sarros S, Satoh K, Cheng K, Cramm M, Fairfoul G, Schmitz M, Zerr I, Cras P, Equestre M, Tagliavini F, Atarashi R, Knox JD, Collins S, Haïk S, Parchi P, Pocchiari M, Green A: Cerebrospinal fluid real-time quaking-induced conversion is a robust and reliable test for sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease: an international study. Annals of Neurology 2016;80(1): 160-5.

2. Cheng K, Vendramelli R, Sloan A, Waitt B, Podhorodecki L, Godal D, Knox JD : End-point quaking-induced conversion: a sensitive, specific, and high-throughput method for the ante-mortem diagnosis of Creutzfeldt-Jacob Disease. Journal of Clinical Microbiology 2016;54(7): 1751-4.

3. Coulthart MB, Geschwind MD, Qureshi S, Phielipp N, Demarsh A, Abrams JY, Belay E, Gambetti P, Jansen GH, Lang AE, Schonberger LB. A case cluster of variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease linked to the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. Brain 2016;139(10): 2609-16 (Editor's Choice).

Presentations:

Surveillance, Prevention and Control of Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease. Infectious Disease Prevention and Control Branch Policy Management Committee. Ottawa, ON, February 9, 2017.

Laboratory Diagnoses and Surveillance of Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease. Clinical Virology Course Seminar. University of Manitoba, November 2, 2016.

General information

Name of horizontal initiative Food Safety Oversight
Lead departments Canadian Food Inspection Agency
Federal partner organizations Health Canada
Non-federal and non-governmental partners Not applicable
Start date of the horizontal initiative 2014-11-15
End date of the horizontal initiative Ongoing
Total federal funding allocated (start to end date) (dollars) 151,999,631 (2014-15 to 2018-19) and 35,606,377 ongoing (includes CFIA and Health Canada)
Total federal planned spending to date (dollars) 80,786,874
Total federal actual spending to date (dollars) 67,123,005
Funding contributed by non-federal and non-governmental partners Not applicable
Governance structures

The CFIA and Health Canada currently work horizontally in delivering their shared food safety mandates. This is supported by a memorandum of understanding, signed in 2008, which provides the foundation for building a clear understanding of their respective roles and responsibilities for human health and provides links across the organizations to improve the design and delivery of integrated health-related solutions.

A governance model exists for the partner organizations to regularly convene and discuss food safety issues of mutual concern and responsibility.

This governance framework includes an Assistant Deputy Minister-level and Director General-level committees on food safety that meet regularly to discuss and plan approaches for addressing joint food safety issues. CFIA and Health Canada will continue to work horizontally through these governance committees. As complementary components of the health portfolio, the two organizations will report results within an integrated, collaborative performance measurement framework.

Contact information

Canadian Food Inspection Agency
Dr. Richard Arsenault
Executive Director
Domestic Food Safety Systems & Meat Hygiene Directorate
Policy and Programs Branch
Telephone: 613-773-6156

Dr. Aline Dimitri
Executive Director
Food Safety Science Directorate
Science Branch
Telephone: 613-773-5542

Dr. Jagvinder Dhanda
Senior Director
National Inspection Division
Operations Branch
Telephone: 613-773-6536

Health Canada
Karen McIntyre
Director General
Food Directorate
Health Products and Food Branch
Telephone: 613-957-1821

Results information
Description of the horizontal initiative

The objective of this horizontal initiative is to strengthen the CFIA's and Health Canada's food safety oversight of the fresh fruits and vegetables sector, the fish and seafood sector and the manufactured food products sector. This objective will be achieved through the implementation of new programming and increased oversight activities.

The objective is aligned with the Government of Canada outcome of "Healthy Canadians."

The two federal organizations, the CFIA and Health Canada, received a total spending authority of $152 million over five years and $35.6 million on an ongoing basis for this initiative.

Fiscal year of planned completion of next evaluation CFIA plans to conduct an evaluation of food safety oversight in 2018-19.
Shared outcome of federal partners Performance indicators Targets Data source and frequency (DSF) of monitoring and reporting Results
ER 10 Footnote 11: Enhanced preventative food safety program management. PI-10: Strengthened design and management of preventative food safety programming. T 10: List of events and materials to support program delivery.

Data source: A comprehensive review of relevant program design initiatives, communications, products, and tools is developed based on input from subject matter experts.

Frequency: Annually (i.e. for Departmental Results Report).

AR 10.1: Development of a risk fiche Footnote 11 related to the risk of pathogens in raw fish and shellfish.

AR 10.2: Draft a report regarding improved controls and risk management.

AR 10.3: Program design for monitoring of marine biotoxins.

AR 10.4: Risk-based prioritization of the fresh fruits and vegetables program.

AR 10.5: Assist in risk assessment and standard development of sprouts.

ER 11: Enhanced inspection activities. PI 11: Increase in inspection activities to the non-meat food areas. T 11: Number of inspections conducted in the non-meat food area. Reporting: CFIA reports this information internally on a quarterly basis. AR 11: The CFIA allocated increased inspection resources in key food safety priorities.
ER-12: Enhanced sampling, testing and analysis PI-12: Increase in sampling, testing and analysis

T-12a: Sampling testing reports, results and analysis completed in the non-meat food areas for the additional 6,000 planned samples.

T-12b: Validated methods developed and implemented to support increased testing in the non-meat food areas.

DSF-12a: Data source: Test reports and analytical results are accessible to CFIA employees through the internal laboratory information management system

Frequency: Actionable results which may be a food safety risk are communicated immediately to the appropriate CFIA personnel responsible for follow-up and investigation. Samples received and tested are reviewed and reported on a quarterly basis. A final internal sample delivery reports is compiled on an annual basis

DSF-12b: Data source: Methods that were developed and validated in previous years will now be implemented for use in regulatory testing.

AR 12.1: Sample testing reports, results and analysis completed in the non-meat food areas for the additional 6,000 planned samples.

AR 12.2: Validated methods developed and implemented to support increased testing in the non-meat food areas.

ER-13: Improved safety in imported food. PI-13: Increase in foreign country assessments of priority areas. T-13: Establish baseline of foreign country assessments and show increase of foreign country assessments.

Data Source: Reports of foreign country assessments.

Reporting: Final reports of foreign country assessments will be accessible through the CFIA website.

AR 13.1: CFIA continued to build its capacity of performing foreign assessments.

AR 13.2: CFIA provided on-going mentoring and training to its staff.

AR 13.3: CFIA delivered two on-site assessments for fresh fruits and vegetables in fiscal 2016-17.

AR 13.4: CFIA continued to engage with authorities in South Korea for delivery of a shellfish sanitation program audit.

AR 13.5: CFIA continued to work with its counterparts in Mexico to finalize the report on the shellfish sanitation program audit conducted in fiscal year 2015-16.

ER-14a: Standard setting support. PI-14a: Development of new and/or updated standards is initiated in 100% of cases where there is an identified need to do so in order to address food safety risks. T-14a: 100% of cases where there is an identified need to do so in order to address food safety risks.

Data source: Administrative data / Health Canada files, and Manual and CFIA systems.

Frequency: Annually

AR 14a: Health Canada (Health Products and Food Branch, Food Directorate) provided input on drafting instructions for modernizing date marking and storage conditions labeling regulations for infant formula.
ER-14b: Standard setting support. PI-14b: Number and type of involvement activities associated with standard setting initiatives. T-14b: To be determined since it will depend on the number and type of standards being developed.

Data source: Administrative data / Health Canada files.

Frequency: Annually.

AR 14b: Standard setting: Health Canada finalized 3 involvement activities associated with standard setting initiatives.
ER-14c: Standard setting support. PI-14c: Number of risk assessments developed in support of standard setting initiatives. T-14c: To be determined since it will depend on the number and type of standards being developed.

Data source: Administrative data/ Health Canada files.

Frequency: Annually.

AR-14c: Six risk assessments related to standard setting initiatives were completed.
ER-14d: Standard setting support. PI-14d: Number of detection methods developed and enhanced in support of standard setting initiatives. T-14d: To be determined since it will depend on the number and type of standards being developed.

Data source: Administrative data / Health Canada files.

Frequency: Annually

AR-14d: Developed and enhanced 9 detection methods in support of standard setting initiatives (food safety and nutrition standard setting).
ER-15: Enhanced food safety risk assessments. PI-15: Timely response to emerging food and nutrition safety incidents including foodborne illness outbreaks. T-15: 90% of health risk assessment provided to CFIA within standard timelines to manage food safety incidents.

Data source: Administrative data/ Health Canada files.

Frequency: Annually

AR-15: 100% of CFIA's health risk assessment requests were completed within the standard timelines.
Expected outcome or result of non-federal and non-governmental partners Not applicable
Performance summary
Federal organizations Link to department's Program Alignment Architecture Contributing programs and activities Link to department's Strategic Outcomes Link to government priorities Total allocation (from start to end date) (dollars) 2016-17 Planned spending (dollars) 2016-17 Actual spending (dollars) 2016-17 Expected results 2016-17 Performance indicators 2016-17 Targets 2016-17 Actual results
Canadian Food Inspection Agency Food Safety Program Preventive food safety program management A safe and accessible food supply and plant and animal resource base Healthy Canadians 10,988,214
(2014-15 to 2018-19) and 2,138,827 ongoing
2,233,270 1,965,241 ER-10 PI-10 T-10 AR-10
Canadian Food Inspection Agency Food Safety Program Enhanced inspection activities A safe and accessible food supply and plant and animal resource base Healthy Canadians 82,937,533
(2014-15 to 2018-19) and 22,189,785 ongoing
23,271,447 17,492,142 ER-11 PI-11 T-11 AR-11
Canadian Food Inspection Agency Food Safety Program Increased sampling, testing and analysis A safe and accessible food supply and plant and animal resource base Healthy Canadians 20,931,033 (2014-15 to 2018-19) and 5,411,341 ongoing 5,609,387 5,420,985 ER-12 PI-12 T-12a
T-12b
AR-12a
AR-12b
Canadian Food Inspection Agency Food Safety Program Foreign country assessments A safe and accessible food supply and plant and animal resource base Healthy Canadians 5,911,834 (2014-15 to 2018-19) and 1,245,327 ongoing 1,182,366 1,045,007 ER-13 PI-13 T-13 AR-13
Canadian Food Inspection Agency Internal Services Preventive food safety program management Not applicable Not applicable 798,752 (2014-15 to 2018-19) and 2,138,827 ongoing 134,116 134,116 Not applicable Not applicable Not applicable Not applicable
Canadian Food Inspection Agency Internal Services Enhanced inspection activities Not applicable Not applicable 7,871,884
(2014-15 to 2018-19) and 22,189,785 ongoing
2,751,391 2,751,391 Not applicable Not applicable Not applicable Not applicable
Canadian Food Inspection Agency Internal Services Increased sampling, testing and analysis Not applicable Not applicable 1,352,418 (2014-15 to 2018-19) and 5,411,341 ongoing 436,890 436,890 Not applicable Not applicable Not applicable Not applicable
Canadian Food Inspection Agency Internal Services Foreign country assessments Not applicable Not applicable 381,539 (2014-15 to 2018-19) and 1,245,327 ongoing 62,961 62,961 Not applicable Not applicable Not applicable Not applicable
Health Canada Food Safety and Nutrition Standard setting Health risks and benefits associated with food products, substances and environmental factors are appropriately managed and communicated to Canadians. Strengthen openness and transparency as modernization of health protection legislation, regulation and service delivery continues. 14,246,254
(2014-15 to 2018-19)
And
3,080,922 ongoing
3,082,256 2,417,922 ER-14a
ER-14b
ER-14c
ER-14d
PI-14a
PI-14b
PI-14c
PI-14d
T-14a
T-14b
T-14c
T-14d
AR-14a
AR-14b
AR-14c
AR-14d
Health Canada Food Safety and Nutrition Health risk assessments Health risks and benefits associated with food products, substances and environmental factors are appropriately managed and communicated to Canadians. Strengthen openness and transparency as modernization of health protection legislation, regulation and service delivery continues. 6,580,170
(2014-15 to 2018-19)
And
1,540,170 ongoing
1,541,831 1,208,849 ER-15 PI-15 T-15 AR-15
Total for all federal organizations Not applicable Not applicable Not applicable Not applicable 151,199,631
(2014-15 to 2018-19)
And
44,401,867 ongoing
40,305,915 32,935,504 Not applicable Not applicable Not applicable Not applicable

ER 10: Expected Results: Enhanced preventative food safety program management.

PI-10: Performance Indicator: Strengthened design and management of preventative food safety programming.

T 10: Targets: List of events and materials to support program delivery.

AR 10.1: Actual Result: Development of a risk fiche Footnote 11 related to the risk of pathogens in raw fish and shellfish.

As part of the work carried out under the program management framework, the CFIA initiated the development of a risk fiche related to the risk of pathogens in raw fish and shellfish. This work, which continues into 2017-18, analyses the risks and controls of pathogens in raw fish and shell fish with the goal of strengthening program design and management of the risks.

AR 10.2 Actual Result: Draft a report regarding improved controls and risk management.

Participated inthe multi-jurisdictional working group from the 2015 vibrio parahaemolyticus outbreak to draft a report regarding improved controls and risk management. Internally, reviewed recommendations pertinent to CFIA activities for further possible action.

AR 10.3 Actual Result: Program design for monitoring of marine biotoxins.

Program design for monitoring of marine biotoxins in geoducks in British Columbia was revised and communicated. Updated guidance to inspection staff aids the CFIAs in providing warning of rising marine toxin levels and increasing the confidence in safety of geoducks for human consumption.

AR 10.4 Actual Result: Risk-based prioritization of the fresh fruits and vegetables program.

Specific to risk-based prioritization of the fresh fruits and vegetables program, CFIA provided inspection staff with program direction to better prioritize risk-based inspections of fresh fruits and vegetables establishments and allocation of resources for sampling of fresh fruits and vegetables establishments presenting higher risk.

AR 10.5 Actual Result: Assist in risk assessment and standard development of sprouts

Specific guidance provided to Inspection staff to collect information through 2016/17 to be sent to Health Canada to assist in risk assessment and standard development of sprouts.

ER 11: Expected Result: Enhanced inspection activities.

PI 11: Performance Indicator: Increase in inspection activities to the non-meat food areas.

T 11: Targets: Number of inspections conducted in the non-meat food area.

AR 11: Actual Results: The CFIA allocated increased inspection resources in the following key food safety priorities:

In addition to these activities, inspection resources were also increased for the following:

ER-12: Expected Result: Increased sampling, testing, and analysis.

PI-12: Performance Indicator: Increased sampling, testing, and analysis.

T 12.1: Targets: Sample testing reports, results and analysis completed in the non-meat food areas.

T 12.2: Targets: Validated methods developed and implemented to support increased testing in the non-meat food areas.

AR 12.1: Actual Results: Sample testing reports, results and analysis completed in the non-meat food areas for the additional 6,000 planned samples.

For 2016-17, CFIA food microbiology and food chemistry laboratories received approximately 5,600 additional samples of high risk non-meat food commodities within the sectors of imported and manufactured foods, fish and seafood, and fresh fruit and vegetables, in support of the Food Safety Oversight initiative. Sample testing reports, results and analysis for approximately 5,200 samples representing over 14,000 tests were generated. Four hundred samples of domestic and imported fish and seafood samples for pesticide analysis were received, but are pending analysis until method validation is completed.

The Food Safety Oversight initiative allowed CFIA laboratories to effectively respond to pressing food safety emergencies, while also maintaining laboratory capacity for all routine and planned testing activities. CFIA laboratories offered testing support for a number of food safety investigations, including the testing of a multitude of samples of frozen berries. These tests addressed a multi-provincial outbreak of Hepatitis A illness, as well as a large scale multi-provincial outbreak of norovirus illness associated with the consumption of oysters.

In addition to supporting testing requests for samples submitted under food safety investigations, CFIA laboratories implemented new sampling plans for fresh oysters collected from retail for the analysis of foodborne viruses, as well as domestic and imported fish samples for the analysis of mercury.

AR 12.2: Actual Results: Validated methods developed and implemented to support increased testing in the non-meat food areas.

The CFIA food microbiology and food chemistry laboratories have undertaken a number of projects to expand and improve testing methods in support of the increased testing in the non-meat food areas. The CFIA has developed a validated and sensitive novel detection and characterization method for Vibrio in shellfish samples. This has reduced the time required to analyse shellfish samples for Vibrio in half - from 3 to 4 days to 1 to 2 days - improving the CFIA's overall ability to respond to unsatisfactory results. CFIA laboratories implemented validated methods for the analysis of viruses in oysters and frozen berries, where it was critical to respond to the large scale multi-provincial outbreaks. In these instances, no other testing laboratory in Canada has this capability. In anticipation of additional fish and seafood samples for pesticide testing, two multi-residue analysis methods are still being validated.

ER 13: Expected Result: Improved safety in imported food.

PI 13: Performance Indicator: Increased foreign country assessments of priority areas.

T 13: Targets: Establish baseline of foreign country assessments and show increase of foreign country assessments.

AR 13.1: Actual Results: CFIA continued to build its capacity of performing foreign assessments. To this respect, CFIA has developed and implemented tools and templates which are available in a common workspace.

AR 13.2: Actual Results: CFIA provided on-going mentoring and training to its staff.

AR 13.3: Actual Results: CFIA delivered two on-site assessments for fresh fruits and vegetables in Guatemala and Mexico in fiscal 2016-2017.

AR 13.4: Actual Results: CFIA continued to engage with authorities in South Korea for delivery of a shellfish sanitation program audit.

AR 13.5: Actual Results: CFIA continued to work with its counterparts in Mexico to finalize the report on the audit of the program for shellfish sanitation conducted in fiscal year 2015-16.

ER 14a: Expected Result: Standard Setting: Development of new and/or updated standards is initiated in 100% of cases where there is an identified need to do this to address food safety risks

PI-14a: Performance Indicator: Development of new and/or updated standards is initiated in 100% of cases where there is an identified need to address risks to food safety.

T 14a: Targets: 100% of cases where there is an identified need to address risks to food safety.

AR 14a: Actual Results: Although no health and safety risks were identified, Health Canada provided input on drafting instructions for modernizing date marking and storage conditions labelling regulations for pre-packaged foods including infant formula.

ER 14b Expected Result: Standard Setting: Number and type of involvement activities associated with standard setting initiatives.

PI-14b: Performance Indicator: Number and type of involvement activities associated with standard setting initiatives.

T 14b: Targets: To be determined, since it will depend on the number and type of standards being developed

AR 14b: Actual Results: Standard Setting: Number and type of involvement activities associated with standard setting initiatives.

ER 14c: Expected Result: Number of detection methods developed and enhanced in support of standard setting initiatives (food safety and nutrition - standard setting).

PI-14c: Performance Indicator: Number of risk assessments developed in support of standard setting initiatives.

T 14c: Targets: To be determined, since it will depend on the number and type of standards being developed.

AR 14c: Actual Results:

ER 14d: Expected Result: Number of detection methods developed and enhanced in support of standard setting initiatives for food safety and nutrition.

PI 14d: Performance Indicator: Number of detection methods developed and enhanced in support of standard setting initiatives.

T 14d: Targets: To be determined, since it will depend on the number and type of standards being developed.

AR 14d: Actual Results: Standard setting: Developed and enhanced a number of detection methods in support of standard setting initiatives.

ER 15: Expected Result: Health Risk Assessments.

PI 15: Performance Indicator: Timely response to emerging food and nutrition safety incidents including foodborne illness outbreaks.

T 15: Targets: 90% of health risk assessment provided to CFIA within standard timelines to manage food safety incidents.

AR 15: Actual Results: 100% of CFIA's health risk assessment requests were completed.

Health Canada continued to fully meet performance targets for completing these types of health risk assessments. For the 2016-17 fiscal year, 100% of a total of 188 health risk assessment requests from the CFIA were completed covering a total of 378 products.

Additionally, 100% of responsive health risk assessments were completed within agreed upon service standards and technical training of scientific evaluators and cross-trained an additional full-time employees for after-hours health risk assessments occurred.

General information

Name of horizontal initiative Canadian Food Safety Information Network
Lead departments CFIA
Federal partner organizations CFIA and Health Canada
Non-federal and non-governmental partners Not Applicable
Start date of the horizontal initiative 2014-15
End date of the horizontal initiative 2018-19
Total federal funding allocated (start to end date) (dollars) 12,133,149Footnote 12
Total federal planned spending to date (dollars) 6,844,771
Total federal actual spending to date (dollars) 6,061,287
Funding contributed by non-federal and non-governmental partners Not applicable
Governance structures

The CFIA's Vice President, Science, is the Executive Sponsor for the implementation of the Canadian Food Safety Information Network.

A federal/provincial/territorial steering committee for the Canadian Food Safety Information Network has been established to provide integrated federal/provincial/territorial leadership, input and guidance for the development and implementation of the Canadian Food Safety Information Network program and associated food safety activities. A secretariat within the CFIA supports the steering committee.

The senior management committee, chaired by the CFIA President, provides direction for the initiative and is accountable for overall implementation of the Canadian Food Safety Information Network.

The CFIA and Health Canada work horizontally in delivering their shared food safety mandates and meet regularly to discuss food safety issues of mutual concerns.

Contact information

Canadian Food Inspection Agency:
Christiane Villemure
Executive Director, Canadian Food Safety Information Network Directorate
Telephone: (613) 773-5811

Health Canada:
Karen McIntyre
Director General
Food Directorate
Health Products and Food Branch
Telephone: (613) 957-1821

Results information
Description of the horizontal initiative

The Canadian Food Safety Information Network will respond to recommendations from the Report of the Independent Investigator into the 2008 Listeriosis Outbreak [Weatherill Report; recommendations 33 and 34]. The initiative will strengthen the ability of Canada's federal, provincial and territorial (federal, provincial and territorial) food safety authorities to share data and information to anticipate, detect and respond to foodborne hazards and minimize the impact of food safety events. The Canadian Food Safety Information Network is expected to link federal, provincial and territorial food safety authorities and food testing laboratories across Canada by leveraging the Public Health Agency of Canada's web-based informatics platform, the Canadian Network for Public Health Intelligence. The Canadian Food Safety Information Network complements the federal public service's modernization strategy, Blueprint 2020, in two of its priority areas. The Canadian Food Safety Information Network contributes to Innovative Practices and Networking by sharing food safety data and information across federal, provincial and territorial jurisdictions. It also contributes to the Technology Priority of Blueprint 2020 by providing a web-based solution combining automated early warning with advanced data analysis for risk-based modelling and planning.

The Canadian Food Safety Information Network supports the Government of Canada's approach to evidence-based policy. Aggregated food safety data will increase the reliability of scientific evidence in risk-based decision-making to strengthen Canada's food safety system. Additionally, the Canadian Food Safety Information Network aligns with the Government of Canada's objective to improve relationships with federal, provincial and territorial partners. The initiative represents a pan-Canadian approach to food safety and requires that federal, provincial and territorial partners work collaboratively to achieve its goals.

Fiscal year of planned completion of next evaluation 2017-18
Shared outcome of federal partners Performance indicators Targets Data source and frequency (DSF) of monitoring and reporting Results
ER 16: Build and maintain collaborative relationships among federal, provincial and territorial partners food safety, establishing a network for information on food safety through data support, coordination and outreach activities. PI 16: Collaborative partnerships are developed and maintained among federal, provincial and territorial authorities for food safety and data support materials are created. T 16: Pre-determined numbers of data support materials created and number of coordination and outreach activities taking place.
  1. One face-to-face meeting per year, as well as monthly teleconference meetings with the Canadian Food Safety Information Network's federal, provincial and territorial stakeholders on the steering committee.
  2. Data will be obtained from the database which captures records of signed memoranda of understanding.
  3. Data will be obtained from Canadian Food Safety Information Network's steering committee concerning the record of decision documents in the database.
  4. Data will be obtained from database records of Canadian Food Safety Information Network pilot participants.
AR 16: Meeting targets towards horizontal integration, collaboration, and coordination among food safety authorities.
ER 17: An environmental scanning tool within Canadian Food Safety Information Network to better understand incidents, technological trends and emerging issues impacting the food supply. PI 17: Activities on developing an environmental scanning tool within Canadian Food Safety Information Network. T 17: Gather information from federal, provincial and territorial partners with regards to current practices.
  1. The number of analysts joining the community will be monitored monthly for 1-3 years after implementation. The data source will be the membership profile if the Canadian Food Safety Information Network.
  2. Data will be obtained from detailed business requirements documents for the records, documents and information management system of the Canadian Food Safety Information Network.
AR 17: Continued development of a systematic pan-Canadian approach to searching and cataloguing intelligence and information.
ER 18: Improved ability of government agencies and industry to anticipate, prepare and respond to food safety issues and emergencies through data support, coordination and outreach with authorities on food safety. PI 18: Data uploaded on the Canadian Laboratory Information Network and training sessions held with Health Canada's research and regulatory community. T 18: Pre-determined number of training activities and food laboratory research results uploaded on the Canadian Laboratory Information Network.

Data source: Administrative data/ Health Canada files.

Frequency: Annually.

AR 18: Health Canada was engaged with the federal, provincial and territorial steering committee to contribute to the development of Canadian Food Safety Information Network. Canadian Laboratory Information Network was successfully upgraded to allow the upload of food research and surveillance data.
Expected outcome or result of non-federal and non-governmental partners Not applicable
Performance summary
Federal organizations Link to department's Program Alignment Architecture Contributing programs and activities Link to department's Strategic Outcomes Link to government priorities Total allocation (from 2014-15 to 2018-19) (dollars) 2016-17 Planned spending (dollars) 2016-17 Actual spending (dollars) 2016-17 Expected results 2016-17 Performance indicators 2016-17 Targets 2016-17 Actual results
Canadian Food Inspection Agency Food Safety Program Data support, coordination and outreach A safe and accessible food supply and plant and animal resource base. Evidence based decision making. 9,330,455 2,091,999 2,036,996 ER 16 PI 16 T 16 AR 16
Canadian Food Inspection Agency Food Safety Program Environmental scanning A safe and accessible food supply and plant and animal resource base. Evidence based decision making 990,306 235,227 224,990 ER 17 PI 17 T 17 AR 17
Canadian Food Inspection Agency Internal Services Data support, coordination and outreach Not applicable Not applicable 571,532 124,640 122,715 Not applicable Not applicable Not applicable Not applicable
Canadian Food Inspection Agency Internal Services Environmental scanning Not applicable Not applicable 70,059 15,911 13,554 Not applicable Not applicable Not applicable Not applicable
Health Canada Food Safety and Nutrition Food Safety Data support, coordination and outreach Health risks and benefits associated with food, products, substances and environmental factors are appropriately managed and communicated to Canadians. Strengthen openness and transparency as modernization of health protection legislation, regulation and service delivery continues. 1,170,797 263,423 173,874 ER 18 PI 18 T 18 AR 18
Total for all federal organizations Not applicable Not applicable Not applicable Not applicable 12,133,149 2,731,200 2,572,129 Not applicable Not applicable Not applicable Not applicable

ER 16: Expected Result: Data support, coordination and outreach: The CFIA continued outreach activities with federal, provincial and territorial partners, including work on formalizing provincial/territorial participation in the Canadian Food Safety Information Network through bilateral data sharing arrangements. Additionally, engagement with Canadian Food Safety Information Network partnered laboratories continued and included activities associated with quality management and accreditation of laboratories. To develop a detailed list of business requirements, extensive consultations took place among the program team for Canadian Food Safety Information Network, CFIA business experts, and federal, provincial and territorial partners. The CFIA, with its partners, developed a common food safety data dictionary, and identified the data elements to be shared, and continued the development of a common system for food and hazard classification.

PI 16: Performance Indicators:

T 16: Targets:

AR 16: Actual Results:

ER 17: Expected Result: Environment Scanning: Advancing coordinated environmental scanning activities to better understand incidents, technological trends, and emerging issues that could affect the safety of Canada's food supply through the development of a community in support of environmental scanning activities.

PI 17: Performance Indicators:

T 17: Targets: Engagement with provincial/territorial partners to gather details of how other departments conduct environmental scanning activities for departmental resources, sources of information and end products to further aid in developing the Canadian Food Safety Information Network functionality.

AR 17: Actual Results:

ER 18: Expected Result: Data Support, Coordination and Outreach: Improved ability of government agencies to anticipate, prepare, and efficiently respond to issues and emergencies in food safety. Activities include coordination and outreach that supports Canadian Food Safety Information Network and the expanded use of the Network within Health Canada food science laboratories.

PI 18: Performance Indicator:

T 18: Targets:

AR 18: Actual Results:

Internal audits and evaluations

Internal audits completed in 2016-17
Title of internal audit Internal audit type Completion date
Audit of the CFIA Staffing Framework Internal Services June 2016
Audit of the Work Planning Cycle for Inspection Activities Program Discontinued
Audit of the Centres of Administration Program Cancelled*
Audit of the CFIA External Stakeholder Complaints Process Program January 2017
Audit of the memorandum of understanding between Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada and the CFIA: Growing Forward 2 Assurance Systems Stream Program January 2017

* Based on an annual evaluation of risk elements, project was replaced with audit of higher priority

CFIA audit reports can be found on the CFIA's website.

Evaluations in progress or completed in 2016-17
Title of evaluation Status Deputy head approval date Link to department's programs
Federal Assistance Program Evaluation Completed August 2016
  • Federal Assistance Program
  • Animal Health and Zoonotics Program
  • Terrestrial Animal Health sub-program
  • Aquatic Animal Health sub-program
  • Plant Resources Program
  • Plant Protection sub-program
Food Safety Program Modernization Evaluation: Part One Completed February 2017
  • Food Safety Program
  • Food Safety Modernization Initiative
  • Electronic Service Delivery Platform
Meat and Poultry Program Evaluation In Progress July 2017
  • Food Safety Program
  • Meat and Poultry sub-program
  • Inspection Verification Teams
  • Daily Shift Presence Renewal
  • Listeria
Animal Health Program Evaluation: Part One In Progress March 2018
  • Animal Health and Zoonotics Program
  • Terrestrial Animal Health sub-program
  • Compensation payments under the Health of Animals Act
Inspector Training In Progress October 2017

Inspector training activities supporting the following programs:

  • Food Safety Program;
  • Animal Health and Zoonotics Program; and
  • Plant Resources Program.
Enforcement In Progress October 2017

Enforcement activities led by the Agency's Enforcement and Investigation Services, supporting the following programs:

  • Food Safety Program;
  • Animal Health and Zoonotics Programs; and
  • Plant Resources Program.
Genomics (led by the National Research Council) Completed April 2017
  • Genomics Research and Development Initiative
Growing Forward Two: Assurance Systems (led by Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada) Completed March 2017
  • Growing Forward Two: Assurance Systems

Response to parliamentary committees

Response to audits conducted by the Auditor General

Beyond the Border Action Plan (Fall 2016 Reports)

Summary (Excerpt from the Office of the Audit General's Fall 2016 Report):

In December 2011, Canada and the United States released the Perimeter Security and Economic Competitiveness Action Plan - better known as the Beyond the Border Action Plan - with a vision of establishing a new long-term partnership to enhance security and accelerate the legitimate flow of people, goods, and services across the border.

The Office of the Audit General estimated that these initiatives had a total planned spending of over $1.1 billion between the 2012-13 and the 2017-18 fiscal years, of which approximately $585 million had been spent as of March 31, 2016.

This audit examined the following factors:

The audit concluded that the selected departments and agencies achieved limited results toward the objectives of the Beyond the Border Action Plan of enhancing security and accelerating the legitimate flow of travel and trade. Although the departments and agencies met many of the commitments of the Action Plan, they faced many challenges in carrying out the initiatives and lacked performance indicators to assess results.

The audit also concluded that the Report on the Beyond the Border Action Plan Horizontal Initiative prepared by Public Safety Canada did not provide a complete and accurate picture of the progress, performance, or costs of the Action Plan.

There were no recommendations for the Canadian Food Inspection Agency.

Response to audits conducted by the Public Service Commission of Canada or the Office of the Commissioner of Official Languages

There were no audits in 2016-17 requiring a response.

Status report on projects operating with specific Treasury Board approval

Status Report on Projects with Specific Treasury Board Approval
Program: Food Safety ($ dollars)
Project Name Original Estimated Total Cost Revised Estimated Total Cost Actual Total Cost 2016-17 Main
Estimates
2016-17 Planned
Spending 1
2016-17
Total
AuthoritiesFootnote 13
2016-17 Actual Spending Expected Date of Close-Out
Electronic Service Delivery Platform 48,352,695 47,747,450 30,450,712 21,340,571 24,838,471 24,838,471 15,518,956 March 2018
Canadian Food Safety Information Network 23,238,740 23,684,048 6,824,301 - 4,050,249 4,050,249 3,397,770 December 2019

User fees, regulatory charges and external fees

This table consists of two sections: "Reporting on the User Fees Act" and "Reporting on the Policy on Service Standards for External Fees."

Reporting on the User Fees Act

General and Financial Information by Fee

General information
Fee name: Food Safety Program
Fee Type: Regulating
Fee-setting authority: CFIA Act
Year introduced:
Year last amended: 1998
Performance Standard: Inspection activities are to be provided in accordance with corresponding federal regulations.
Performance results: Inspection activities were provided in accordance with corresponding federal regulations.
Other information:
Financial Information, 2016-17 (dollars)
2016-17 Forecast Revenue (dollars) 2016-17 Actual Revenue (dollars) 2016-17 Full Cost (dollars)
31,025,586 30,463,905 491,650,371
Financial Information, 2017-18, 2018-19 and 2019-20 (dollars)
Planning Years Forecast Revenue (dollars) Estimated Full Cost (dollars)
2017-18 31,025,586 450,019,284
2018-19 31,025,586 413,787,461
2019-20 31,025,586 391,806,332
Fee name: Animal Health & Zoonotics Program
Fee Type: Regulating
Fee-setting authority: CFIA Act
Year introduced:
Year last amended: 1998
Performance Standard: Inspection activities are to be provided in accordance with corresponding federal regulations.
Performance results: Inspection activities were provided in accordance with corresponding federal regulations.
Other information:
Financial Information, 2016-17 (dollars)
2016-17 Forecast Revenue (dollars) 2016-17 Actual Revenue (dollars) 2016-17 Full Cost (dollars)
2,763,326 2,713,299 231,101,310
Financial Information, 2017-18, 2018-19 and 2019-20 (dollars)
Planning Years Forecast Revenue (dollars) Estimated Full Cost (dollars)
2017-18 2,763,326 211,532,528
2018-19 2,763,326 194,501,682
2019-20 2,763,326 184,169,406
Fee name: Plant Resources Program
Fee Type: Regulating
Fee-setting authority: CFIA Act
Year introduced:
Year last amended: 1998
Performance Standard: Inspection activities are to be provided in accordance with corresponding federal regulations.
Performance results: Inspection activities were provided in accordance with corresponding federal regulations.
Other information:
Financial Information, 2016-17 (dollars)
2016-17 Forecast Revenue (dollars) 2016-17 Actual Revenue (dollars) 2016-17 Full Cost (dollars)
6,601,025 6,481,522 105,962,740
Financial Information, 2017-18, 2018-19 and 2019-20 (dollars)
Planning Years Forecast Revenue (dollars) Estimated Full Cost (dollars)
2017-18 6,601,025 96,990,218
2018-19 6,601,025 89,181,369
2019-20 6,601,025 84,443,896
Fee name: International Collaboration & Technical Program
Fee Type: Regulating
Fee-setting authority: CFIA Act
Year introduced:
Year last amended: 1998
Performance Standard:
Performance results:
Other information:
Financial Information, 2016-17 (dollars)
2016-17 Forecast Revenue (dollars) 2016-17 Actual Revenue (dollars) 2016-17 Full Cost (dollars)
12,771,063 12,539,858 41,658,164
Financial Information, 2017-18, 2018-19 and 2019-20 (dollars)
Planning Years Forecast Revenue (dollars) Estimated Full Cost (dollars)
2017-18 12,771,063 38,130,709
2018-19 12,771,063 35,060,740
2019-20 12,771,063 33,198,251
Fee name: Internal Services
Service standard: Other Products and Services
Fee-setting authority: Access to Information Act
Year introduced: 1981, came in to force 1983
Performance Standard: Response provided within 30 days following receipt of request; the response time may be extended pursuant to section 9 of the Access to Information Act. Notice of extension is to be sent within 30 days after receipt of request. Target is 90%.
Year last amended: 2016
Performance results: Greater than 95% of the time.
Other information:
Financial Information, 2016-17 (dollars)
2016-17 Forecast Revenue (dollars) 2016-17 Actual Revenue (dollars) 2016-17 Full Cost (dollars)
1,545 3,293 1,918,164
Financial Information, 2017-18, 2018-19 and 2019-20 (dollars)
Planning Years Forecast Revenue (dollars) Estimated Full Cost (dollars)
2017-18 3,293 1,755,741
2018-19 3,293 1,614,384
2019-20 3,293 1,528,625
Summary of Financial Information for All User Fees and Regulatory Charges 2016-17 (dollars)
Forecast Revenue Actual Revenue Full Cost
Regulatory subtotal 53,161,000 52,198,585 870,372,585
Other products and services subtotal 1,545 3,293 1,918,164
Total, all fee types 53,162,545 52,201,878 872,290,749
Summary of Financial Information for All User Fees and Regulatory Charges 2016-17, 2017-18 and 2018-19 (dollars)
Planning Year Forecast revenue Estimated full cost
Regulatory subtotal 2017-18 53,161,000 796,672,740
2018-19 53,161,000 732,531,252
2019-20 53,161,000 693,617,885
Other products and services subtotal 2017-18 3,293 1,755,741
2018-19 3,293 1,614,384
2019-20 3,293 1,528,625
Total, all fee types 2017-18 53,164,293 798,428,481
2018-19 53,164,293 734,145,636
2019-20 53,164,293 695,146,510
Reporting on the Policy on Service Standards for External Fees
General information by fee
Fee name: Fees charged for the processing of access requests filed under the Access to Information Act
Service standard: Response provided within 30 days following receipt of request; response time may be extended pursuant to section 9 of the Access to Information Act. Notice of extension to be sent within 30 days of receipt of request.
Performance results:

Of the 356 requests completed under the Access to Information Act last fiscal year,
207 (58%) were completed in under 30 days;
35 (10%) were completed in 31 to 60 days;
85 (24%) were completed in 61 to 120 days; and
29 (8%) were completed in 121 days or more.

Stakeholder consultation in 2016–17 or prior fiscal years The service standard is established by the Access to Information Act and the Access to Information Regulations. Consultations with stakeholders were conducted by the Department of Justice and the Treasury Board Secretariat for amendments made in 1986 and 1992
Other information:
Destination Inspection Service
Fee name: Destination Inspection Service (fresh fruits and vegetables)
Service standard: The service standard is to respond to 80% of inspection requests within eight working hours of receiving a request and 100% of inspection requests within 24 hours.
Performance results: National Results: 88.5% within 8 hours and 99.3% within 24 hours (national destination inspection service inspection results)
Stakeholder consultation in 2016–17 or prior fiscal years

The CFIA consults with the fresh fruit and vegetable sector on an ongoing basis, and at least bi-annually with its National Industry Advisory Board, which most recently occurred in June 2016.
Service standards and user fees for destination inspection services are reviewed every five years. The current destination inspection service user fee came into effect on April 1, 2014.
The most recent consultation on service standards was held from December 13, 2012 to February 21, 2013.
This consultation was conducted online and included posting of the user fee proposal on the CFIA website and providing a link on the Consulting Canadians website, issuing a World Trade Organization notification, engagement with national industry associations and outreach through front-line staff.

Other information: The next stakeholder consultation on service standards and user fees will be held April 2019, as per CFIA user fee policy.
Service Standards for the Application for Feed Registration and Ingredient Approval
Fee name: Timeliness: For 90% or more of the applications received
Service standard: Feed Section screens applications within ten days of receiving them.
Performance results: 49.2% of feed applications completed in 2016–2017 were within the published service delivery standard of 90 days (the target is set at 90%).
Stakeholder consultation in 2016–17 or prior fiscal years We published our service delivery results on our website as well as communicating them to stakeholders, as part of the semi-annual meetings of the Canadian Animal Health Products Regulatory Advisory Committee on June 20, 2017.
Other information: The next stakeholder consultation is scheduled for November 2017.
Fee name: Timeliness: For 90% or more of the applications received
Service standard: For products requiring a review of efficacy data, a preliminary review is conducted within 10 days of the screening date, and results are communicated to the applicant.
Performance results: Summary data not available for 2016-17 as no dossiers completed an initial review during this period.
Stakeholder consultation in 2016–17 or prior fiscal years Stakeholder consultations were conducted as part of the semi-annual meetings of the Canadian Animal Health Products Regulatory Advisory Committee on June 15, 2016, November 22, 2016 and June 20, 2017.
Other information: The next stakeholder consultation is scheduled for November 2017.
Fee name: Timeliness: For 90% or more of the applications received
Service standard: The laboratory does a desk review of proposed methods of analysis within four weeks of receiving them. If laboratory testing is required, it will be done within 12 weeks of receiving a suitable method and test samples, depending on availability of specialized equipment.
Performance results: Summary data not available for 2016-17 as no dossiers completed an initial review during this period.
Stakeholder consultation in 2016–17 or prior fiscal years Stakeholder consultations were conducted as part of the semi-annual meetings of the Canadian Animal Health Products Regulatory Advisory Committee on June 15, 2016, November 22, 2016 and June 20, 2017.
Other information: The next stakeholder consultation is scheduled for November 2017.
Fee name: Quality
Service standard: The Feeds Regulations are consistently interpreted and applied in registration/approval decisions.
Performance results: 100%
Stakeholder consultation in 2016–17 or prior fiscal years Stakeholder consultations were conducted as part of the semi-annual meetings of the Canadian Animal Health Products Regulatory Advisory Committee on June 15, 2016, November 22, 2016 and June 20, 2017.
Other information: The next stakeholder consultation is scheduled for November 2017.
Fee name: Quality
Service standard: Information is openly exchanged between clients and evaluation specialists.
Performance results: 100%
Stakeholder consultation in 2016–17 or prior fiscal years Stakeholder consultations were conducted as part of the semi-annual meetings of the Canadian Animal Health Products Regulatory Advisory Committee on June 15, 2016, November 22, 2016 and June 20, 2017.
Other information: The next stakeholder consultation is scheduled for November 2017.
Fee name: Quality
Service standard: Analytical methods are evaluated for specificity, selectivity, reliability and accuracy, using internationally standardized procedures for validation of methods.
Performance results: 100%
Stakeholder consultation in 2016–17 or prior fiscal years Stakeholder consultations were conducted as part of the semi-annual meetings of the Canadian Animal Health Products Regulatory Advisory Committee on June 15, 2016, November 22, 2016 and June 20, 2017.
Other information: The next stakeholder consultation is scheduled for November 2017.
Service Standards for Fertilizer Registration
Fee name: Fertilizer Registration-Related Fees
Service standard:

To meet service delivery standards on individual service standards ≥90% of the time:
Me-Too registration - 90 days
New Registration (Level I and II) - 465 days
New Registration (Level III) - 530 days
Re-Registration (Level I and II) - 345 days
Re-registration (Level III) - 530 days
Major Amendment - 530 days
Minor Amendment - 135 days

Performance results:

Me-Too registration - 100%
New Registration (Level I and II) - 87%
New Registration (Level III) - 79%
Re-Registration (Level I and II) - 89%
Re-registration ((Level III) - N/A
Major Amendment - 97%
Minor Amendment - 100%

Stakeholder consultation in 2016–17 or prior fiscal years The Canadian Fertilizer Products Forum is the CFIA's primary consultative stakeholder body, with diverse representation from the various sectors of the fertilizer and supplement market in Canada. During the Fall of each year, the Canadian Fertilizer Products Forum and CFIA hold a joint meeting, during which the CFIA delivers presentations on its change agenda, upcoming policy initiatives, and reports out on its performance against service delivery standards during the previous year. The most recent Canadian Fertilizer Products Forum meeting was held November 1 and 2, 2016.
Other information: The next Canadian Fertilizer Products Forum meeting is planned for end of October 2017.
Service Standards for the Veterinary Biologics Program

Dossier Review (new submission, change in product formulation or change in label claim)

Other information:

Canadian Manufacturers
Fee name: Review initial submission and prepare response
Service standard: Maximum response time is four months (120 days)
Performance results: Of the 4 initial reviews, 3 (75%) were completed within 120 days.
Stakeholder consultation in 2016–17 or prior fiscal years Stakeholder consultations were conducted at semi-annual meetings of the Canadian Animal Health Products Regulatory Advisory Committee on June 15, 2016, November 22, 2016 and June 20, 2017.
Other information: To address stakeholder concerns, a phased review system is in place, allowing for the review of and response to the initial submission while studies and data are pending.
The next stakeholder consultation is scheduled for November 2017.
Fee name: Review supplemental data and prepare response
Service standard: Maximum response time is six weeks
Performance results: Conducted 100% of the 7 required audits/inspections of Canadian manufacturers within the service standard.
Stakeholder consultation in 2016–17 or prior fiscal years Stakeholder consultations were conducted at semi-annual meetings of the Canadian Animal Health Products Regulatory Advisory Committee on June 15, 2016, November 22, 2016 and June 20, 2017.
Other information: The next stakeholder consultation is scheduled for November 2017.
American Manufacturers
Fee name: Review initial submission and prepare response
Service standard: Maximum response time is four months
Performance results: Of the 24 initial reviews, 19 (79%) were completed within 120 days.
Stakeholder consultation in 2016–17 or prior fiscal years Stakeholder consultations were conducted at semi-annual meetings of the Canadian Animal Health Products Regulatory Advisory Committee on June 15, 2016, November 22, 2016 and June 20, 2017.
Other information: The next stakeholder consultation is scheduled for November 2017.
Fee name: Review supplemental data and prepare response
Service standard: Maximum response time is six weeks
Performance results:
  • Audited/inspected 100% of one U.S. manufacturer of autogenous vaccines or products under the Food and Drug Administration's Export Reform and Enhancement Act.
  • Audited/inspected 100% of one U.S. manufacturer of other veterinary biologics considered a risk within the service standard.
Stakeholder consultation in 2016–17 or prior fiscal years Stakeholder consultations were conducted at semi-annual meetings of the Canadian Animal Health Products Regulatory Advisory Committee on June 15, 2016, November 22, 2016 and June 20, 2017.
Other information: The next stakeholder consultation is scheduled for November 2017.
Manufacturers from other countries
Fee name: Review initial submission and prepare response
Service standard: Maximum response time is six months
Performance results: Of the two initial reviews, both (100%) were completed within the service standard.
Stakeholder consultation in 2016–17 or prior fiscal years Stakeholder consultations were conducted at semi-annual meetings of the Canadian Animal Health Products Regulatory Advisory Committee on June 15, 2016, November 22, 2016 and June 20, 2017.
Other information: The next stakeholder consultation is scheduled for November 2017.
Fee name: Review initial submission and prepare response
Service standard: Maximum response time is six weeks
Performance results: Audited/inspected 100% of one non-Canadian or non-U.S. manufacturers considered a risk within the service standard.
Stakeholder consultation in 2016–17 or prior fiscal years Stakeholder consultations were conducted at semi-annual meetings of the Canadian Animal Health Products Regulatory Advisory Committee on June 15, 2016, November 22, 2016 and June 20, 2017.
Other information: The next stakeholder consultation is scheduled for November 2017.
Facility Inspections/Audits
Fee name: Canadian manufacturers
Service standard: Annual
Performance results: Conducted 100% of the seven required audits/inspections of Canadian manufacturers within the service standard
Stakeholder consultation in 2016–17 or prior fiscal years Stakeholder consultations were conducted at semi-annual meetings of the Canadian Animal Health Products Regulatory Advisory Committee on June 15, 2016, November 22, 2016 and June 20, 2017.
Other information: The next stakeholder consultation is scheduled for November 2017.
Fee name: Canadian importers
Service standard: Minimum every three years
Performance results: Audited/inspected 70% of the 27 Canadian importers within the service standard.
Stakeholder consultation in 2016–17 or prior fiscal years Stakeholder consultations were conducted at semi-annual meetings of the Canadian Animal Health Products Regulatory Advisory Committee on June 15, 2016, November 22, 2016 and June 20, 2017.
Other information: The next stakeholder consultation is scheduled for November 2017.
Fee name: American manufacturers
Service standard: Minimum every three years
Performance results: Audited/inspected 100% of two United States manufacturers of autogenous vaccines or veterinary biologic products.
Stakeholder consultation in 2016–17 or prior fiscal years Stakeholder consultations were conducted at semi-annual meetings of the Canadian Animal Health Products Regulatory Advisory Committee on June 15, 2016, November 22, 2016 and June 20, 2017.
Other information: The next stakeholder consultation is scheduled for November 2017.
Fee name: Other non-Canadian manufacturers
Service standard: Minimum every four years
Performance results: Audited/inspected 100% of one non-Canadian or non-United States manufacturers within the service standard.
Stakeholder consultation in 2016–17 or prior fiscal years Stakeholder consultations were conducted at semi-annual meetings of the Canadian Animal Health Products Regulatory Advisory Committee on June 15, 2016, November 22, 2016 and June 20, 2017.
Other information: For internationally-based veterinary biologics manufacturer facilities, the Canadian Centre for Veterinary Biologics will inspect when the product is first licensed in Canada. Subsequent inspections will be arranged as necessary.
The next stakeholder consultation is scheduled for November 2017.
Issuance of Permits, Licences and Export Certificates
Fee name: Issuance of Permits, Licenses and Export Certificates
Service standard: Maximum response time is two weeks
Performance results: The Agency renewed 100% of the annual import permits product licences and establishment licences within the service standard.
The Agency processed applications for 99% of the 115 export certificates, and 96% of 191 permits for emergency use or for investigational use within the service standard.
Stakeholder consultation in 2016–17 or prior fiscal years Stakeholder consultations were conducted at semi-annual meetings of the Canadian Animal Health Products Regulatory Advisory Committee on June 15, 2016, November 22, 2016 and June 20, 2017.
Other information: The next stakeholder consultation is scheduled for November 2017.
Serial Release
Fee name: Serial Release (If not tested)
Service standard: Maximum response time is 10 working days
Performance results: For serials not requiring testing, 265 (100%) of serial release test documents were processed within the service standard.
Stakeholder consultation in 2016–17 or prior fiscal years Stakeholder consultations were conducted at semi-annual meetings of the Canadian Animal Health Products Regulatory Advisory Committee on June 15, 2016, November 22, 2016 and June 20, 2017.
Other information: The next stakeholder consultation is scheduled for November 2017.
Fee name: Serial Release (If tested)
Service standard: Maximum response time is 35 days
Performance results: For serials requiring testing, four (100%) of serial release test documents were processed within the target determined at the time of serial submission.
Stakeholder consultation in 2016–17 or prior fiscal years Stakeholder consultations were conducted at semi-annual meetings of the Canadian Animal Health Products Regulatory Advisory Committee on June 15, 2016, November 22, 2016 and June 20, 2017.
Other information: The next stakeholder consultation is scheduled for November 2017.
Label Review and Approval
Fee name: Label Review and Approval
Service standard: Maximum response time is four weeks
Performance results: 96% of 76 submissions were responded to within the service standard.
Stakeholder consultation in 2016–17 or prior fiscal years Stakeholder consultations were conducted at semi-annual meetings of the Canadian Animal Health Products Regulatory Advisory Committee on June 15, 2016, November 22, 2016 and June 20, 2017.
Other information: The next stakeholder consultation is scheduled for November 2017.
Fee name: Advertising Review and Approval
Service standard: Maximum response time is four weeks
Average response time is two weeks
Performance results: Not applicable. The Health of Animals Regulations 135.3 was repealed in 1997 to remove the requirement for pre-approval of advertising
Stakeholder consultation in 2016–17 or prior fiscal years Not applicable
Other information: Health of Animals Regulation 135.3 was repealed in 1997 to remove the requirement for pre-approval of advertising
Fee name: Protocol Review for Efficacy/Safety Studies
Service standard: Maximum response time is 45 days
Performance results: Other than as components of new product licensing submissions, no efficacy or safety study protocols were submitted for review in 2016-2017.
Stakeholder consultation in 2016–17 or prior fiscal years Stakeholder consultations were conducted at semi-annual meetings of the Canadian Animal Health Products Regulatory Advisory Committee on June 15, 2016, November 22, 2016 and June 20, 2017.
Other information: The next stakeholder consultation is scheduled for November 2017.
Fee name: Production Outline Revisions
Service standard: Maximum response time is four weeks
Performance results: Summary data not available for 2016-2017.
Stakeholder consultation in 2016–17 or prior fiscal years Stakeholder consultations were conducted at semi-annual meetings of the Canadian Animal Health Products Regulatory Advisory Committee on June 15, 2016, November 22, 2016 and June 20, 2017.
Other information: The next stakeholder consultation is scheduled for November 2017.
Suspected Adverse Events
Fee name: Suspected Adverse Events
Service standard: Maximum response time is four weeks
Performance results: Performance results were not tracked in 2016-2017 due to administrative changes within the Canadian Centre for Veterinary Biologics.
Stakeholder consultation in 2016–17 or prior fiscal years Stakeholder consultations were conducted at semi-annual meetings of the Canadian Animal Health Products Regulatory Advisory Committee on June 15, 2016, November 22, 2016 and June 20, 2017.
Other information: The next stakeholder consultation is scheduled for November 2017.

Federal tax expenditures

The tax system can be used to achieve public policy objectives through the application of special measures such as low tax rates, exemptions, deductions, deferrals and credits. The Department of Finance Canada publishes cost estimates and projections for these measures each year in the Report on Federal Tax Expenditures. This report also provides detailed background information on tax expenditures, including descriptions, objectives, historical information and references to related federal spending programs. The tax measures presented in this report are the responsibility of the Minister of Finance.

Organizational contact information

Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA)

1400 Merivale Road,
Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0Y9
Canada

Telephone: 1-800-442-2342 / 1-613-773-2342

Teletypewriter: 1-800-465-7735

Appendix: definitions

appropriation (crédit)

Any authority of Parliament to pay money out of the Consolidated Revenue Fund.

budgetary expenditures (dépenses budgétaires)

Operating and capital expenditures; transfer payments to other levels of government, organizations or individuals; and payments to Crown corporations.

Core Responsibility (responsabilité essentielle)

An enduring function or role performed by a department. The intentions of the department with respect to a Core Responsibility are reflected in one or more related Departmental Results that the department seeks to contribute to or influence.

Departmental Plan (Plan ministériel)

Provides information on the plans and expected performance of appropriated departments over a three-year period. Departmental Plans are tabled in Parliament each spring.

Departmental Result (résultat ministériel)

A Departmental Result represents the change or changes that the department seeks to influence. A Departmental Result is often outside departments' immediate control, but it should be influenced by program-level outcomes.

Departmental Result Indicator (indicateur de résultat ministériel)

A factor or variable that provides a valid and reliable means to measure or describe progress on a Departmental Result.

Departmental Results Framework (cadre ministériel des résultats)

Consists of the department's Core Responsibilities, Departmental Results and Departmental Result Indicators.

Departmental Results Report (Rapport sur les résultats ministériels)

Provides information on the actual accomplishments against the plans, priorities and expected results set out in the corresponding Departmental Plan.

Evaluation (évaluation)

In the Government of Canada, the systematic and neutral collection and analysis of evidence to judge merit, worth or value. Evaluation informs decision making, improvements, innovation and accountability. Evaluations typically focus on programs, policies and priorities and examine questions related to relevance, effectiveness and efficiency. Depending on user needs, however, evaluations can also examine other units, themes and issues, including alternatives to existing interventions. Evaluations generally employ social science research methods.

full-time equivalent (équivalent temps plein)

A measure of the extent to which an employee represents a full person-year charge against a departmental budget. Full-time equivalents are calculated as a ratio of assigned hours of work to scheduled hours of work. Scheduled hours of work are set out in collective agreements.

government-wide priorities (priorités pangouvernementales)

For the purpose of the 2016-17 Departmental Results Report, government-wide priorities refers to those high-level themes outlining the government's agenda in the 2015 Speech from the Throne, namely: Growth for the Middle Class; Open and Transparent Government; A Clean Environment and a Strong Economy; Diversity is Canada's Strength; and Security and Opportunity.

horizontal initiatives (initiative horizontale)

An initiative where two or more federal organizations, through an approved funding agreement, work toward achieving clearly defined shared outcomes, and which has been designated (for example, by Cabinet or a central agency) as a horizontal initiative for managing and reporting purposes.

Management, Resources and Results Structure (Structure de la gestion, des ressources et des résultats)

A comprehensive framework that consists of an organization's inventory of programs, resources, results, performance indicators and governance information. Programs and results are depicted in their hierarchical relationship to each other and to the Strategic Outcome(s) to which they contribute. The Management, Resources and Results Structure is developed from the Program Alignment Architecture.

non-budgetary expenditures (dépenses non budgétaires)

Net outlays and receipts related to loans, investments and advances, which change the composition of the financial assets of the Government of Canada.

performance (rendement)

What an organization did with its resources to achieve its results, how well those results compare to what the organization intended to achieve, and how well lessons learned have been identified.

performance indicator (indicateur de rendement)

A qualitative or quantitative means of measuring an output or outcome, with the intention of gauging the performance of an organization, program, policy or initiative respecting expected results.

performance reporting (production de rapports sur le rendement)

The process of communicating evidence-based performance information. Performance reporting supports decision making, accountability and transparency.

planned spending (dépenses prévues)

For Departmental Plans and Departmental Results Reports, planned spending refers to those amounts that receive Treasury Board approval by February 1. Therefore, planned spending may include amounts incremental to planned expenditures presented in the Main Estimates.

A department is expected to be aware of the authorities that it has sought and received. The determination of planned spending is a departmental responsibility, and departments must be able to defend the expenditure and accrual numbers presented in their Departmental Plans and Departmental Results Reports.

plans (plans)

The articulation of strategic choices, which provides information on how an organization intends to achieve its priorities and associated results. Generally a plan will explain the logic behind the strategies chosen and tend to focus on actions that lead up to the expected result.

priorities (priorité)

Plans or projects that an organization has chosen to focus and report on during the planning period. Priorities represent the things that are most important or what must be done first to support the achievement of the desired Strategic Outcome(s).

program (programme)

A group of related resource inputs and activities that are managed to meet specific needs and to achieve intended results and that are treated as a budgetary unit.

Program Alignment Architecture (architecture d'alignement des programmes)

A structured inventory of an organization's programs depicting the hierarchical relationship between programs and the Strategic Outcome(s) to which they contribute.

results (résultat)

An external consequence attributed, in part, to an organization, policy, program or initiative. Results are not within the control of a single organization, policy, program or initiative; instead they are within the area of the organization's influence.

statutory expenditures (dépenses législatives)

Expenditures that Parliament has approved through legislation other than appropriation acts. The legislation sets out the purpose of the expenditures and the terms and conditions under which they may be made.

Strategic Outcome (résultat stratégique)

A long-term and enduring benefit to Canadians that is linked to the organization's mandate, vision and core functions.

sunset program (programme temporisé)

A time-limited program that does not have an ongoing funding and policy authority. When the program is set to expire, a decision must be made whether to continue the program. In the case of a renewal, the decision specifies the scope, funding level and duration.

target (cible)

A measurable performance or success level that an organization, program or initiative plans to achieve within a specified time period. Targets can be either quantitative or qualitative.

voted expenditures (dépenses votées)

Expenditures that Parliament approves annually through an Appropriation Act. The Vote wording becomes the governing conditions under which these expenditures may be made.

Appendix: definitions

appropriation (crédit)

Any authority of Parliament to pay money out of the Consolidated Revenue Fund.

budgetary expenditures (dépenses budgétaires)

Operating and capital expenditures; transfer payments to other levels of government, organizations or individuals; and payments to Crown corporations.

Core Responsibility (responsabilité essentielle)

An enduring function or role performed by a department. The intentions of the department with respect to a Core Responsibility are reflected in one or more related Departmental Results that the department seeks to contribute to or influence.

Departmental Plan (Plan ministériel)

Provides information on the plans and expected performance of appropriated departments over a three-year period. Departmental Plans are tabled in Parliament each spring.

Departmental Result (résultat ministériel)

A Departmental Result represents the change or changes that the department seeks to influence. A Departmental Result is often outside departments' immediate control, but it should be influenced by program-level outcomes.

Departmental Result Indicator (indicateur de résultat ministériel)

A factor or variable that provides a valid and reliable means to measure or describe progress on a Departmental Result.

Departmental Results Framework (cadre ministériel des résultats)

Consists of the department's Core Responsibilities, Departmental Results and Departmental Result Indicators.

Departmental Results Report (Rapport sur les résultats ministériels)

Provides information on the actual accomplishments against the plans, priorities and expected results set out in the corresponding Departmental Plan.

Evaluation (évaluation)

In the Government of Canada, the systematic and neutral collection and analysis of evidence to judge merit, worth or value. Evaluation informs decision making, improvements, innovation and accountability. Evaluations typically focus on programs, policies and priorities and examine questions related to relevance, effectiveness and efficiency. Depending on user needs, however, evaluations can also examine other units, themes and issues, including alternatives to existing interventions. Evaluations generally employ social science research methods.

full-time equivalent (équivalent temps plein)

A measure of the extent to which an employee represents a full person-year charge against a departmental budget. Full-time equivalents are calculated as a ratio of assigned hours of work to scheduled hours of work. Scheduled hours of work are set out in collective agreements.

government-wide priorities (priorités pangouvernementales)

For the purpose of the 2016-17 Departmental Results Report, government-wide priorities refers to those high-level themes outlining the government's agenda in the 2015 Speech from the Throne, namely: Growth for the Middle Class; Open and Transparent Government; A Clean Environment and a Strong Economy; Diversity is Canada's Strength; and Security and Opportunity.

horizontal initiatives (initiative horizontale)

An initiative where two or more federal organizations, through an approved funding agreement, work toward achieving clearly defined shared outcomes, and which has been designated (for example, by Cabinet or a central agency) as a horizontal initiative for managing and reporting purposes.

Management, Resources and Results Structure (Structure de la gestion, des ressources et des résultats)

A comprehensive framework that consists of an organization's inventory of programs, resources, results, performance indicators and governance information. Programs and results are depicted in their hierarchical relationship to each other and to the Strategic Outcome(s) to which they contribute. The Management, Resources and Results Structure is developed from the Program Alignment Architecture.

non-budgetary expenditures (dépenses non budgétaires)

Net outlays and receipts related to loans, investments and advances, which change the composition of the financial assets of the Government of Canada.

performance (rendement)

What an organization did with its resources to achieve its results, how well those results compare to what the organization intended to achieve, and how well lessons learned have been identified.

performance indicator (indicateur de rendement)

A qualitative or quantitative means of measuring an output or outcome, with the intention of gauging the performance of an organization, program, policy or initiative respecting expected results.

performance reporting (production de rapports sur le rendement)

The process of communicating evidence-based performance information. Performance reporting supports decision making, accountability and transparency.

planned spending (dépenses prévues)

For Departmental Plans and Departmental Results Reports, planned spending refers to those amounts that receive Treasury Board approval by February 1. Therefore, planned spending may include amounts incremental to planned expenditures presented in the Main Estimates.

A department is expected to be aware of the authorities that it has sought and received. The determination of planned spending is a departmental responsibility, and departments must be able to defend the expenditure and accrual numbers presented in their Departmental Plans and Departmental Results Reports.

plans (plans)

The articulation of strategic choices, which provides information on how an organization intends to achieve its priorities and associated results. Generally a plan will explain the logic behind the strategies chosen and tend to focus on actions that lead up to the expected result.

priorities (priorité)

Plans or projects that an organization has chosen to focus and report on during the planning period. Priorities represent the things that are most important or what must be done first to support the achievement of the desired Strategic Outcome(s).

program (programme)

A group of related resource inputs and activities that are managed to meet specific needs and to achieve intended results and that are treated as a budgetary unit.

Program Alignment Architecture (architecture d'alignement des programmes)

A structured inventory of an organization's programs depicting the hierarchical relationship between programs and the Strategic Outcome(s) to which they contribute.

results (résultat)

An external consequence attributed, in part, to an organization, policy, program or initiative. Results are not within the control of a single organization, policy, program or initiative; instead they are within the area of the organization's influence.

statutory expenditures (dépenses législatives)

Expenditures that Parliament has approved through legislation other than appropriation acts. The legislation sets out the purpose of the expenditures and the terms and conditions under which they may be made.

Strategic Outcome (résultat stratégique)

A long-term and enduring benefit to Canadians that is linked to the organization's mandate, vision and core functions.

sunset program (programme temporisé)

A time-limited program that does not have an ongoing funding and policy authority. When the program is set to expire, a decision must be made whether to continue the program. In the case of a renewal, the decision specifies the scope, funding level and duration.

target (cible)

A measurable performance or success level that an organization, program or initiative plans to achieve within a specified time period. Targets can be either quantitative or qualitative.

voted expenditures (dépenses votées)

Expenditures that Parliament approves annually through an Appropriation Act. The Vote wording becomes the governing conditions under which these expenditures may be made.

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